US Long-Term Ecological Research Network

Lake Mendota water temperature secchi depth snow depth ice thickness and meterological conditions 1894 - 2007

Abstract
Data for water temperature at different depth and different frequencies assembled from various sources by Dale Roberson. A table with additional parameters collected at the same time is also provided for dates when available. These parameters are weather observations, secchi depth, snow and ice depths.
Dataset ID
335
Date Range
-
Methods
Data were assembled from different collectors, names are given in metadata. Measurements were conducted by hand.
NTL Keyword
Version Number
14

WSC - Temperature and relative humidity data from 150 locations in and around Madison, Wisconsin from 2012 -2017

Abstract
To study the urban heat island and other local climatic processes in Madison, Wisconsin, in March 2012, 135 HOBO U23 Pro v2 temperature/relative humidity sensors in RS1 solar shields (Onset Computing) were attached to streetlight and utility poles in and around Madison, Wisconsin. Additional locations were added in 2012 and 2013 for a total of 150 locations. The sensors were installed at a height of 3.5 meters, and they automatically record instantaneous temperature and relative humidity every 15 minutes. This dataset includes all temperature/humidity measurements and a separate file with the coordinates of each measurement location.
Dataset ID
324
Date Range
-
Metadata Provider
Methods
Temperature and relative humidity were recorded using Onset HOBO U23 Pro v2 temperature/relative humidity sensors in RS1 solar shields, which were attached to streetlight and utility poles in and around Madison, Wisconsin. The sensors were installed at a height of 3.5 meters, were oriented north, and automatically recorded instantaneous temperature and relative humidity every 15 minutes beginning in March 2012.
Version Number
20

North Temperate Lakes LTER: High Frequency Meteorological and Dissolved Oxygen Data - Sparkling Lake UCSD buoy 2013

Abstract
During the summer of 2013 an additional buoy with wind, pressure, temperature and precipitation sensors was located on Sparkling Lake.
Contact
Dataset ID
304
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
wind, pressure, temperature and precipitation sensors on buoy.
Version Number
16

North Temperate Lakes LTER: High Frequency Meteorological Data - Crystal Lake 2011 - 2014

Abstract
Data from the instrumented buoy on Crystal Lake include micrometeorological parameters, relative humidity, air temperature, wind velocity, wind driection (2 m height),and water temperatures, pH, chlorophyll, and dissolved oxygen measured by a sonde that is moving through the water column.
Contact
Dataset ID
302
Date Range
-
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
Data from the instrumented buoy on Crystal Lake include micrometeorological parameters, relative humidity, air temperature, wind velocity, wind driection (2 m height),and water temperatures, pH, chlorophyll, and dissolved oxygen measured by a sonde that is moving through the water column. Sampling Frequency: one minute;
Version Number
19

Fluxes project at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Hydrology Scenarios Model Output

Abstract
A spatially-explicit simulation model of hydrologic flow-paths was developed by Matthew C. Van de Bogert and collaborators for his PhD project, "Aquatic ecosystem carbon cycling: From individual lakes to the landscape." The model is coupled with an in-lake carbon model and simulates hydrologic flow paths in groundwater, wetlands, lakes, uplands, and streams. The goal of this modeling effort was to compare aquatic carbon cycling in two climate scenarios for the North Highlands Lake District (NHLD) of northern Wisconsin: one based on the current climate and the other based on a scenario with warmer winters where lakes and uplands do not freeze, hereinafter referred to as the "no freeze" scenario. In modeling this "no freeze" scenario the same precipitation and temperature data as the current climate model was used, however temperature inputs were artificially floored at 0 degrees Celsius. While not discussed in his dissertation, Van de Bogert considered two other climate scenarios each using the same precipitation and temperature data as the current climate scenario. These scenarios involved running the model after artificially raising and lowering the current temperature data by 10 degrees Celsius. Thus, four scenarios were considered in this modeling effort, the current climate scenario, the "no freeze" scenario, the +10 degrees scenario, and the -10 degrees scenario. These data are the outputs of the model under the different scenarios and include average monthly temperature, average monthly rainfall, average monthly snowfall, total monthly precipitation, daily evapotranspiration, daily surface runoff, daily groundwater recharge, and daily total runoff. Note that the results of how temperature inputs influence aquatic carbon cycling under these different scenarios is not included in this data set, refer to Van de Bogert (2011) for this information. Documentation: Van de Bogert, M.C., 2011. Aquatic ecosystem carbon cycling: From individual lakes to the landscape. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. The University of Wisconsin - Madison, United States -- Wisconsin, p. 156.
Core Areas
Dataset ID
286
Date Range
-
Metadata Provider
Methods
The spatially explicit Lakes, Uplands, Wetlands Integrator (LUWI) model of the NHLD was used to explore the interactions among climate, watershed connections, hydrology and carbon cycling. See Cardille et al. 2007 and Cardille et al. 2009 for details on the LUWI model. See Van de Bogert (2011) for a discussion of how these model outputs are used in conjunction with LUWI to predict the effects on lake carbon cycling under the current and "no freeze" climate scenarios.The climate data used in this modeling effort, precipitation and temperature, were obtained from Minoqua, Wisconsin, USA from 1948-2000. In order to test the effect of a climate without freezing temperatures on lake water and carbon cycling the current climate was modeled in addition to a “no freeze” scenario where a minimum air temperature of 0 degrees Celsius was imposed on the model. Note that Van de Bogert (2011) only focuses on the current and “no freeze” climate scenarios, but these data are representative of four climate scenarios: the current climate (base_minoqua_precip), the scenario where the current climate is artificially floored to zero degrees Celsius (no_below_zero), and the scenarios where the current climate is increased and decreased by 10 degrees Celsius (minus_10_degrees and plus_10_degrees).Furthermore, the temperature and precipitation data that was used for the current climate model runs was broken up into aggregates.The aggregates are the length of the 1948-2000 Minoqua temperature and precipitation data that was used in model runs. A total of seven different aggregates were used for model runs under each of the four climate scenarios. The aggregates include temperature and precipitation data from Minoqua, WI, USA for 1. the complete record from 1948-2000 (1948_2000) 2. the driest year which was 1976 (1976_driest) 3. The wettest year which was 1953 (1953_wettest) 4. the five driest years on record from 1948-2000 (5_driest) 5. the five wettest years on record from 1948-2000 (5_wettest) 6. the five coldest years on record for December, January, and February from 1948-2000 (5_coldest_djf) 7. the five warmest years on record for December, January, and February from 1948-2000 (5_warmest_djf).The volume and timing of precipitation to the region were unchanged between scenarios.Evaporation rates were derived from values obtained from the NTL-LTER study site, Sparkling Lake (46.01, -89.70). Refer to Van de Bogert (2011) for a more complete discussion of model inputs and a discussion of the results of the model output. Documentation: Van de Bogert, M.C., 2011. Aquatic ecosystem carbon cycling: From individual lakes to the landscape. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. The University of Wisconsin - Madison, United States -- Wisconsin, p. 156.Cardille, J.A., Carpenter, S.R., Coe, M.T., Foley, J.A., Hanson, P.C., Turner, M.G., Vano, J.A., 2007. Carbon and water cycling in lake-rich landscapes: Landscape connections, lake hydrology, and biogeochemistry. Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences 112.Cardille, J.A., Carpenter, S.R., Foley, J.A., Hanson, P.C., Turner, M.G., Vano, J.A., 2009. Climate change and lakes: Estimating sensitivities of water and carbon budgets. Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences 114.
Version Number
20

Additional Daily Meteorological Data for Madison Wisconsin (1884-2010)

Abstract
These data are in addition to "Madison Wisconsin Daily Meteorological Data 1869-current." Additional variables added include: daily cloud cover, wind, solar radiation, vapor pressure, dew point temperature, total atmospheric pressure, and average relative humidity for Madison, Wisconsin. In addition, the adjustment factors which were applied on a given date to calculate the adjusted parameters in "Madison Wisconsin Daily Meteorological Data 1869-current" are also included in these data. Raw data, in English units, were assembled by Douglas Clark - Wisconsin State Climatologist. Data were converted to metric units and adjusted for temporal biases by Dale M. Robertson. For adjustments applied to various parameters see Robertson, 1989 Ph.D. Thesis UW-Madison. Adjusted data represent the BEST estimated daily data and may be raw data. Data collected at Washburn observatory, 8-1-1883 to 9-30-1904. Data collected at North Hall, 10-1-1904 to 12-31-1947 Data collected at Truax Field (Admin BLDG), 1-1-1948 to 12-31-1959. Data collected at Truax Field, center of field, 1-1-1960 to Present. Much of the data after 1990 were obtained in digital form from Ed Hopkins, UW-Meteorology. Data starting in 2002-2005 were obtained from Sullivan at http://www.weather.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=mkx%20 ,then go to CF6 and download monthly data to Madison_sullivan_conversion. Relative humidity data was obtained from 1986 to 1995 from CD's at the State Climatologist's Office. Since Robertson (1989) adjusted all historical data to that collected prior to 1989; no adjustments were applied to the recent data except for wind and estimated vapor pressure. Wind after January 1997, and only wind from the southwest after November 2007, was extended by Dale M. Robertson and Yi-Fang "Yvonne" Hsieh, see methods. Estimated vapor pressure after April 2002 was updated by Yvonne Hsieh, see methods.
Dataset ID
282
Date Range
-
Metadata Provider
Methods
Raw data (in English units) were assembled by Douglas Clark - Wisconsin State Climatologist. Data were converted to metric units and adjusted for temporal biases by Dale M. Robertson. For adjustments applied to various parameters see Robertson, 1989 Ph.D. Thesis UW-Madison. Adjusted data represent the BEST estimated daily data and may be raw data. Data collected at Washburn observatory, 8-1-1883 to 9-30-1904. Data collected at North Hall, 10-1-1904 to 12-31-1947 Data collected at Truax Field (Admin BLDG), 1-1-1948 to 12-31-1959. Data collected at Truax Field (Center of Field), 1-1-1960 to Present. Much of the data after 1990 were obtained in digital form from Ed Hopkins, UW-Meteorology. Data starting in 2002-05 were obtained from Sullivan at <a href="http://www.weather.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=mkx%20">http://www.weather.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=mkx</a> ,then go to CF6 and download monthly data to Madison_sullivan_conversion. Since Robertson (1989) adjusted all historical data to that collected from 1884-1989; no adjustments were applied to the recent data except for (1) wind and (2) estimated vapor pressure:(1) Wind after January 1997, and only wind from the southwest after November 2007, was extended by Dale M. Robertson and Yvonne Hsieh.In 1996, a discontinuity in the wind record was caused by change in observational techniques and sensor locations (Mckee et al. 2000). To address the non-climatic changes in wind speed, data from MSN were carefully compared with those collected from the tower of the Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Building at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, see http://ginsea.aos.wisc.edu/labs/mendota/index.htm. Hourly data from both sites (UMSN,hourly and UAOS,hourly) during 2003&ndash;2010 were used to form a 4&times;12 (four components of wind direction &times; 12 months) matrix (K4,12) of wind correction factors, yielding UAOS,daily= Ki,j&times;UMSN,daily. The comparison results indicated that the MSN weather station reported a higher magnitude in winds out of the east by 5% and lower magnitude in winds out of the west and south by 30% and 10%. The adjusted wind data (=Ki,j&times;UMSN,daily) were therefore employed and used in the model simulation. After adjustments, there was a decrease in wind velocities starting shortly before 1996. Overall the adjusted wind data had a decline in wind velocities of 16% from 1988&ndash;93 to 1994&ndash;2009) compared to a 7% decline at a nearby weather station with no known observational changes (St. Charles, Illinois; 150 km southeast of Lake Mendota). (2) Estimated vapor pressure was updated (after April 2002) by using the equation from DYRESM for estimation of vapor pressure (a function of both air temperature and dew point temperature); where a=7.5, b=237.3, and c=.7858.
Version Number
23

Minocqua Dam Monthly Meteorological Data at North Temperate Lakes LTER 1905 - current

Abstract
Minoqua Dam, Wisconsin. Meteorological measurements are being gathered at a site at the Minocqua Dam for these purposes: 1) to supplement the data from the raft on Sparkling Lake and 2) to provide standard meteorological measurements for the North Temperate Lakes site. The following parameters are measured and stored as monthly values: 1) mean daily air temperature, 2) mean maximum air temperature, 3) mean minimum air temperature, 4) total precipitation, and 5) total snowfall. Sampling Frequency: data averaged to monthly values Number of sites: 1
Dataset ID
19
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Metadata Provider
Methods
Standard National Weather Service weather station
Short Name
NTLME03
Version Number
27

Minocqua Dam Daily Meteorological Data at North Temperate Lakes LTER 1978 - current

Abstract
Meteorological measurements are being gathered at a site at the Minocqua Dam for these purposes: 1) to supplement the data from the raft on Sparkling Lake and 2) to provide standard meteorological measurements for the North Temperate Lakes site. The following parameters are measured and stored as daily values: 1) maximum air temperature, 2) minimum air temperature, 3) precipitation, 4) snowfall, and 5) snowdepth. Snowdepth data begin in 1996. Precipitation data are summed for 5- minute intervals during periods of detectable precipitation. Data are reported at 7am each day for the previous 24 hours. E.g, data for June 5 are for period 7am June 4 to 7am June 5. Sampling Frequency: data averaged to daily values Number of sites: 1
Dataset ID
18
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
Standard National Weather Service weather station set up.
Short Name
NTLME02
Version Number
30

Madison Wisconsin Daily Meteorological Data 1869 - current

Abstract
Daily air temperature, precipitation and snow depth data for Madison from 1869. For a full description of data prior to 1987 see Robertson, 1989 (Ph.D. Thesis). Raw data (in English units) prior to 1977 were assembled by Douglas Clark - Wisconsin State Climatologist. Data were converted to metric units and adjusted for temporal biases by Dale M. Robertson. Adjusted data represent the BEST estimated daily data and may be raw data. Daily temperature data prior to 1884 were estimated from 3 times per day sampling and biases are expected and should not be comparable with data after that time. For adjustments applied to various parameters see Robertson, 1989 Ph.D. Thesis UW-Madison. Douglas Clark had assembled and adjusted 1948 to 1977 data for his own research earlier. Data from 1989 to 1995 obtained from CD's at the Wis. State Climatologists Office. Air Temp adjusted to data at Truax Field. Data collected at Bascom Hall, 1-1-1869 to 9-30-1878. Data collected at North Hall, 10-1-1904 to 12-31-1947. Data collected at Browns Block, 10-1-1878 to 4-31-1883. Data collected at Truax Field (Admin BLDG), 1-1-1948 to 12-31-195. Data collected at North Hall, 5-1-1883 to 7-31-1883. Data collected at Truax Field (Center of Field), 1-1-1960 to Present. Data collected at Washburn observatory, 8-1-1883 to 9-30-1904. Wind data collected at Truax from 1-1-1947 to Present. Much of the data after 1990 were obtained in digital form from Ed Hopkins, UW-Meteorology Sampling Frequency: daily values Number of sites: 1
Dataset ID
20
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
For a full description of data prior to 1987 see Robertson, 1989 (Ph.D. Thesis). Raw data (in English units) prior to 1977 were assembled by Douglas Clark - Wisconsin State Climatologist. Data were converted to metric units and adjusted for temporal biases by Dale M. Robertson. Adjusted data represent the BEST estimated daily data and may be raw data. Daily temperature data prior to 1884 were estimated from 3 times per day sampling and biases are expected and should not be comparable with data after that time. For adjustments applied to various parameters see Robertson, 1989 Ph.D. Thesis UW-Madison. Douglas Clark had assembled and adjusted 1948 to 1977 data for his own research earlier. Data from 1989 to 1995 obtained from CD's at the Wis. State Climatologists Office. Air Temp adjusted to data at Truax Field. Data collected at Bascom Hall, 1-1-1869 to 9-30-1878. Data collected at North Hall, 10-1-1904 to 12-31-1947. Data collected at Browns Block, 10-1-1878 to 4-31-1883. Data collected at Truax Field (Admin BLDG), 1-1-1948 to 12-31-195. Data collected at North Hall, 5-1-1883 to 7-31-1883. Data collected at Truax Field (Center of Field), 1-1-1960 to Present. Data collected at Washburn observatory, 8-1-1883 to 9-30-1904. Wind data collected at Truax from 1-1-1947 to Present. Much of the data after 1990 were obtained in digital form from Ed Hopkins, UW-Meteorology Sampling Frequency: daily values Number of sites: 1
Short Name
NTLME04
Version Number
32

North Temperate Lakes LTER Meteorological Data - Woodruff Airport 1989 - current

Abstract
Meteorological measurements are being gathered at a site at the Noble F. Lee Municipal airport located at Woodruff, WI for three purposes: 1) to supplement the data from the raft on Sparkling Lake used for evaporation calculations, and 2) to provide standard meteorological measurements for the North Temperate Lakes site, and 3) to measure radiation for primary production studies in the study lakes at the site. The following parameters are measured at 1-minute intervals: 1) air temperature at 1.5 m above ground, 2) relative humidity at 1.5 m above ground, 3) wind speed and direction and peak windspeed at 3 m above ground, 4) total long-wave radiation, 5) total short-wave radiation, 6) photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), 7) total solar radiation, and 8) total precipitation. High resolution data is taken, typically at 10 minute intervals, as well as 1-hour and 24-hour averages: Half-hourly averages of PAR and shortwave radiation are also stored. Precipitation data are summed for 5-minute intervals during periods of detectable precipitation. Derived data included in this data set include dewpoint temperature and vapor pressure, as well as daily minimum and maximum values for some parameters. Data are automatically updated into the database every six hours. Sampling Frequency: varies for instantaneous sample. averaged to hourly, half-hourly and daily values from one minute samples Number of sites: 1. Date/time is Central Standard Time (GMT - 06:00) throughout the year.
Dataset ID
17
Date Range
-
Metadata Provider
Methods
The following parameters are measured at 1-minute intervals: 1) air temperature at 1.5 m above ground, 2) relative humidity at 1.5 m above ground, 3) wind speed and direction and peak windspeed at 3 m above ground, 4) total long-wave radiation, 5) total short-wave radiation, 6) photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), 7) total solar radiation, and 8) total precipitation. High resolution data is taken, typically at 10 minute intervals, as well as 1-hour and 24-hour averages: Half-hourly averages of PAR and shortwave radiation are also stored. Precipitation data are summed for 5-minute intervals during periods of detectable precipitation. Derived data included in this data set include dewpoint temperature and vapor pressure, as well as daily minimum and maximum values for some parameters. Data are automatically updated into the database every six hours. Sampling Frequency: varies for instantaneous sample. averaged to hourly, half-hourly and daily values from one minute samples Number of sites: 1
Short Name
NTLME01
Version Number
33
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