US Long-Term Ecological Research Network

North Temperate Lakes LTER Regional Survey water temperature DO 2015 - current

Abstract
The Northern Highlands Lake District (NHLD) is one of the few regions in the world with periodic comprehensive water chemistry data from hundreds of lakes spanning almost a century. Birge and Juday directed the first comprehensive assessment of water chemistry in the NHLD, sampling more than 600 lakes in the 1920s and 30s. These surveys have been repeated by various agencies and we now have data from the 1920s (UW), 1960s (WDNR), 1970s (EPA), 1980s (EPA), 1990s (EPA), and 2000s (NTL). The 28 lakes sampled as part of the Regional Lake Survey have been sampled by at least four of these regional surveys including the 1920s Birge and Juday sampling efforts. These 28 lakes were selected to represent a gradient of landscape position and shoreline development, both of which are important factors influencing social and ecological dynamics of lakes in the NHLD. This long-term regional dataset will lead to a greater understanding of whether and how large-scale drivers such as climate change and variability, lakeshore residential development, introductions of invasive species, or forest management have altered regional water chemistry.
Water temperature and dissolved oxygen profiles were taken on sampling days.
Contact
Dataset ID
382
Date Range
-
Maintenance
ongoing
Methods
water temperature and dissolved oxygen were measured at 1 meter intervals with a opto sonde
Version Number
1

North Temperate Lakes LTER Regional Survey Zooplankton 2015 - current

Abstract
The Northern Highlands Lake District (NHLD) is one of the few regions in the world with periodic comprehensive water chemistry data from hundreds of lakes spanning almost a century. Birge and Juday directed the first comprehensive assessment of water chemistry in the NHLD, sampling more than 600 lakes in the 1920s and 30s. These surveys have been repeated by various agencies and we now have data from the 1920s (UW), 1960s (WDNR), 1970s (EPA), 1980s (EPA), 1990s (EPA), and 2000s (NTL). The 28 lakes sampled as part of the Regional Lake Survey have been sampled by at least four of these regional surveys including the 1920s Birge and Juday sampling efforts. These 28 lakes were selected to represent a gradient of landscape position and shoreline development, both of which are important factors influencing social and ecological dynamics of lakes in the NHLD. This long-term regional dataset will lead to a greater understanding of whether and how large-scale drivers such as climate change and variability, lakeshore residential development, introductions of invasive species, or forest management have altered regional water chemistry. Zooplankton samples were taken at approximately the deepest part of each lake, via a vertical tow with a Wisconsin net. Count of individuals and presence absence data for all lakes in study region are provided here.
Contact
Core Areas
Dataset ID
381
Date Range
-
Maintenance
ongoing
Methods
Each zooplankton sample was taken at approximately the deepest part of each lake, via a vertical tow with a Wisconsin net (20cm diameter mouth, 80µ mesh) lowered to 1 meter above the bottom of a lake and then pulled up slowly at a rate of about 3 seconds per meter. Contents of the net were preserved in 4-oz jars with 95% ethanol. One sample was taken from each lake. Samples were collected by the Regional Lakes summer sampling crew in June 2015.
Version Number
1

North Temperate Lakes LTER Regional Survey Water Chemistry 2015 - current

Abstract
The Northern Highlands Lake District (NHLD) is one of the few regions in the world with periodic comprehensive water chemistry data from hundreds of lakes spanning almost a century. Birge and Juday directed the first comprehensive assessment of water chemistry in the NHLD, sampling more than 600 lakes in the 1920s and 30s. These surveys have been repeated by various agencies and we now have data from the 1920s (UW), 1960s (WDNR), 1970s (EPA), 1980s (EPA), 1990s (EPA), and 2000s (NTL). The 28 lakes sampled as part of the Regional Lake Survey have been sampled by at least four of these regional surveys including the 1920s Birge and Juday sampling efforts. These 28 lakes were selected to represent a gradient of landscape position and shoreline development, both of which are important factors influencing social and ecological dynamics of lakes in the NHLD. This long-term regional dataset will lead to a greater understanding of whether and how large-scale drivers such as climate change and variability, lakeshore residential development, introductions of invasive species, or forest management have altered regional water chemistry. The regional lakes survey in 2015 followed the standard LTER protocol for standard water chemistry and biology. Samples were taken as close to solar noon as possible. Seven lakes had replicates performed, which were chosen at random.
Contact
Dataset ID
380
Date Range
-
Maintenance
ongoing
Methods
Inorganic and organic carbon
Inorganic carbon is analyzed by phosphoric acid addition on a Shimadzu TOC-V-csh Total Organic Carbon Analyzer.
Organic carbon is analyzed by combustion, on a Shimadzu TOC-V-csh Total Organic Carbon Analyzer.
Version Number
2

Wisconsin creel dataset as well as predictor variables for lakes from 1990 to 2017 to estimate statewide recreational fisheries harvest

Abstract
Recreational fisheries have high economic worth, valued at $190B globally. An important, but underappreciated, secondary value of recreational catch is its role as a source of food. This contribution is poorly understood due to difficulty in estimating recreational harvest at spatial scales beyond an individual system, as traditionally estimated from angler creel surveys. Here, we address this gap using a 28-year creel survey of ~300 Wisconsin inland lakes. We develop a statistical model of recreational harvest for individual lakes and then scale-up to unsurveyed lakes (3769 lakes; 73% of statewide lake surface area) to generate a statewide estimate of recreational lake harvest of ~4200 t and an estimated annual angler consumption rate of ~3 kg, nearly double estimated United States per capita freshwater fish consumption. Recreational fishing harvest makes significant contributions to human diets, is critical for discussions on food security, and the multiple ecosystem services of freshwater systems.
Contact
Core Areas
Dataset ID
379
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Methods
The state of Wisconsin is comprised of about 15,000 inland lakes ranging from 0.5 to 53,394 ha (WDNR 2009). Most lakes occur in the northern and eastern part of the state as a result of glaciation. about 3,620 lakes are greater than 20 ha and together comprise about 93% of the state's inland lake surface area (Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources 2009). Wisconsin lakes constitute a wide range of physical and biological characteristics. Wisconsin inland lakes support valuable recreational fisheries for a variety of species, including Walleye (Sander vitreus), Northern Pike (Esox lucius), Muskellunge (Esox masquinongy), Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens), Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides), Smallmouth Bass (Micropterus dolomieu), Lake Sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), and a variety of sunfish species (Lepomis spp.).
Version Number
2

North Temperate Lakes LTER Regional Survey Water Color Scans 2015 - current

Abstract
The Northern Highlands Lake District (NHLD) is one of the few regions in the world with periodic comprehensive water chemistry data from hundreds of lakes spanning almost a century. Birge and Juday directed the first comprehensive assessment of water chemistry in the NHLD, sampling more than 600 lakes in the 1920s and 30s. These surveys have been repeated by various agencies and we now have data from the 1920s (UW), 1960s (WDNR), 1970s (EPA), 1980s (EPA), 1990s (EPA), and 2000s (NTL). The 28 lakes sampled as part of the Regional Lake Survey have been sampled by at least four of these regional surveys including the 1920s Birge and Juday sampling efforts. These 28 lakes were selected to represent a gradient of landscape position and shoreline development, both of which are important factors influencing social and ecological dynamics of lakes in the NHLD. This long-term regional dataset will lead to a greater understanding of whether and how large-scale drivers such as climate change and variability, lakeshore residential development, introductions of invasive species, or forest management have altered regional water chemistry. Color is measured in water samples that are filtered in the field through 0.45 um nucleopore membrane filters. A spectrophotometer is used to quantify color in the lab as absorbance (unitless) at 1 nm intervals between the wavelengths of 200 and 800 nm. Absorbance data are considered suspect for values greater than 2.
Dataset ID
377
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Methods
We collect water samples for color at the deepest part of the lakes. The samples are surface water, filtered in the field through 0.45u polycarbonate membrane filters. We run a wavelength scan from 800 to 200nm, using a 5cm rectangular quartz cell in a Beckman Coulter Model DU800 spectrophotometer. Any samples that display absorbance values above 2AU are run again from 400 to 200nm using a 1cm quartz cuvette. Inititally the full range of wavelengths were run again and two values may be found in the database even if the original measurement with the large cuvette did not exceed 2AU. The user should discard values above 2AU and use values from the smaller cuvette instead. All values are given as measurements at the path lenth of the employed cuvette and need to be devided by the cuvette length for a comparable value at a pathlength of 1 cm.

The single beam Beckman Coulter DU800 spec is blanked first on a sample of DI water. Additional blank values are from a scan run on DI after that blanking as a check and are reported alongside the scans but are not subtracted from the scan values.
Version Number
3

Ground water levels for 964 monitoring wells in Wisconsin, 1929 - 2015

Abstract
This dataset contains the daily groundwater level observations and other monitoring well attributes in Wisconsin. It covers 964 groundwater level monitoring wells and has 400,812 observations. The time span of this dataset is between February 2nd, 1929 and December 31st, 2015. The data sources include United States Geological Survey (USGS), Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR), University of Wisconsin Extension, counties in Central Sands area, and North Temperate Lakes - Long-Term Ecological Research (NTL-LTER).
The data compilation consists of three major steps. First, the data were retrieved from different data sources. Then the data from different sources were pooled together. No well was monitored by more than one entity so none of the wells’ records were merged. Third, two rounds of quality assurance and quality control (QAQC) were conducted.
Wells in confined aquifers were not included in this dataset. The values of the USGS and Central Sands data are the depth to the water whereas LTER values are mean sea level elevations of the groundwater levels. These data could not be directly compared with each other.
This data compilation was funded by the Wisconsin Groundwater Joint Solicitation.
Dataset ID
363
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Methods
For detailed methods of data gathering, cleaning and compiling see attached pdf file.
Version Number
2

Lake Water Level observations for 1036 lakes in Wisconsin, 1900 - 2015

Abstract
This dataset contains the daily lake level observations and other lake attributes in Wisconsin. It covers 1036 lakes including 461 seepage lakes and 575 drainage lakes. It has 342,319 observations. The time span of this dataset is between January 1st, 1900 and December 31st, 2015. The data sources include USGS, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, North Temperate Lakes-Long Term Ecological Research (NTL-LTER), North Lakeland Discovery Center, Waushara County, and City of Shell Lake. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has two data sources: historical lake levels recorded in paper files and a recently-initiated citizen monitoring program. The latter are stored in Wisconsin DNR’s Surface Water Integrated Monitoring System (SWIMS).
The data compilation consists of four major steps. First, data were retrieved from different data sources. Then data from different sources but for the same lakes were tied together using the datum information if possible. The WISCID is used to denote unique data sets by lake and data source. If two data sources could be tied to the same datum, they share a WISCID. Third, three rounds of quality assurance and quality control (QAQC) were conducted. Finally, more attributes such as lake area, lake depth, and lake type were added to the lakes. This data compilation was funded by the Wisconsin Groundwater Joint Solicitation.

Dataset ID
362
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Methods
Data were compiled from many sources, each was quality controlled and merged into this dataset. For detailed methods see attached PDF file.
Version Number
4

Long-term fish size data for Wisconsin Lakes Department of Natural Resources and North Temperate Lakes LTER 1944 - 2012

Abstract
This dataset describes long-term (1944-2012) variations in individual fish total lengths from Wisconsin lakes. The dataset includes information on 1.9 million individual fish, representing 19 species. Data were collected by Wisconsin Department of Natural Resource fisheries biologists as part of routine lake fisheries assessments. Individual survey methodologies varied over space and time and are described in more detail by Rypel, A. et al., 2016. Seventy-Year Retrospective on Size-Structure Changes in the Recreational Fisheries of Wisconsin. Fisheries, 41, pp.230-243. Available at: http://afs.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03632415.2016.1160894
Contact
Core Areas
Creator
Dataset ID
357
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Methods
Fisheries surveys of inland lakes and streams in Wisconsin have been conducted by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) professionals and its predecessor the Wisconsin Conservation Department for >70 y. Standard fyke net and boat electrofishing surveys tend to dominate the fisheries surveys and data collected. Most fyke net data on certain species (e.g., Walleye Sander vitreus and Muskellunge Esox masquinongy) originates from annual spring netting surveys following ice-out. These data are used for abundance estimates, mark and recapture surveys for estimating population sizes, and egg-take procedures for the hatcheries. Boat-mounted boom and mini-boom electrofishing surveys became increasingly common in the late 1950s and 1960s. Boat electrofishing surveys have typically been conducted during early summer months (May and June), but some electrofishing survey data are also collected in early spring as part of walleye and muskellunge mark-recapture surveys. Summer fyke netting surveys have been collected more sporadically over time, but were once more commonly used as a panfish survey methodology. Surveys were largely non-standardized. Thus, future users and statistical comparisons utilizing these data should acknowledge the non-standard nature of their collection. More in-depth description of these data can be found in Rypel, A. et al., 2016. Seventy-Year Retrospective on Size-Structure Changes in the Recreational Fisheries of Wisconsin. Fisheries, 41, pp.230-243. Available at: http://afs.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03632415.2016.1160894
Version Number
3

Long-term fish abundance data for Wisconsin Lakes Department of Natural Resources and North Temperate Lakes LTER 1944 - 2012

Abstract
This dataset describes long-term (1944-2012) variations in the relative abundance of fish populations representing nine species in Wisconsin lakes. Data were collected by Wisconsin Department of Natural Resource fisheries biologists as part of routine lake fisheries assessments. Individual survey methodologies varied over space and time and are described in more detail by Rypel, A. et al., 2016. Seventy-Year Retrospective on Size-Structure Changes in the Recreational Fisheries of Wisconsin. Fisheries, 41, pp.230-243. Available at: http://afs.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03632415.2016.1160894
Contact
Core Areas
Creator
Dataset ID
356
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Methods
Fisheries surveys of inland lakes and streams in Wisconsin have been conducted by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) professionals and its predecessor the Wisconsin Conservation Department for >70 y. Standard fyke net and boat electrofishing surveys tend to dominate the fisheries surveys and data collected. Most fyke net data on certain species (e.g., Walleye Sander vitreus and Muskellunge Esox masquinongy) originates from annual spring netting surveys following ice-out. These data are used for abundance estimates, mark and recapture surveys for estimating population sizes, and egg-take procedures for the hatcheries. Boat-mounted boom and mini-boom electrofishing surveys became increasingly common in the late 1950s and 1960s. Boat electrofishing surveys have typically been conducted during early summer months (May and June), but some electrofishing survey data are also collected in early spring as part of walleye and muskellunge mark-recapture surveys. Summer fyke netting surveys have been collected more sporadically over time, but were once more commonly used as a panfish survey methodology. Surveys were largely non-standardized. Thus, future users and statistical comparisons utilizing these data should acknowledge the non-standard nature of their collection. More in-depth description of these data can be found in Rypel, A. et al., 2016. Seventy-Year Retrospective on Size-Structure Changes in the Recreational Fisheries of Wisconsin. Fisheries, 41, pp.230-243. Available at: http://afs.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03632415.2016.1160894
Version Number
5

North Temperate Lakes LTER Regional Survey Macrophytes Plant Index 2015 - current

Abstract
The Northern Highlands Lake District (NHLD) is one of the few regions in the world with periodic comprehensive water chemistry data from hundreds of lakes spanning almost a century. Birge and Juday directed the first comprehensive assessment of water chemistry in the NHLD, sampling more than 600 lakes in the 1920s and 30s. These surveys have been repeated by various agencies and we now have data from the 1920s (UW), 1960s (WDNR), 1970s (EPA), 1980s (EPA), 1990s (EPA), and 2000s (NTL). The 28 lakes sampled as part of the Regional Lake Survey have been sampled by at least four of these regional surveys including the 1920s Birge and Juday sampling efforts. These 28 lakes were selected to represent a gradient of landscape position and shoreline development, both of which are important factors influencing social and ecological dynamics of lakes in the NHLD. This long-term regional dataset will lead to a greater understanding of whether and how large-scale drivers such as climate change and variability, lakeshore residential development, introductions of invasive species, or forest management have altered regional water chemistry. The purpose of the macrophyte survey is to identify, and quantify the types of aquatic plants within the various 28 regional survey lakes. The macrophyte survey consists of sampling macrophyte plants using a metal rake attached to a 15ft pole at approximately 140 spatially resolved points on a lake that are spread out in a grid like fashion, equally spaced from each other. Sampling locations were chosen such that the maximum depth at which macrophytes were surveyed was equal to or less than 15ft of water. Macrophyte sampling occurs in the latter part of the summer (after July 10) to ensure that macrophytes have had adequate time to grow and our sampling efforts capture the typical summer macrophyte community in each lake. Macrophyte sampling in these 28 lakes is ongoing and will be repeated approximately once every six years.
Core Areas
Dataset ID
338
Date Range
-
Methods
the protocol employed here is based on:
Hauxwell, J., S. Knight, K. Wagner, A. Mikulyuk, M. Nault, M. Porzky and S. Chase . 2010. Recommended baseline monitoring of aquat ic plants in Wisconsin : sampling design, field and laboratory procedures, data entry and analys is, and applica tions. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Bureau of Science Services, PUB-SS-1068 2010. Madison, Wisconsin, USA.
Version Number
13
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