US Long-Term Ecological Research Network

North Temperate Lakes LTER Regional Survey Zooplankton 2015 - current

Abstract
The Northern Highlands Lake District (NHLD) is one of the few regions in the world with periodic comprehensive water chemistry data from hundreds of lakes spanning almost a century. Birge and Juday directed the first comprehensive assessment of water chemistry in the NHLD, sampling more than 600 lakes in the 1920s and 30s. These surveys have been repeated by various agencies and we now have data from the 1920s (UW), 1960s (WDNR), 1970s (EPA), 1980s (EPA), 1990s (EPA), and 2000s (NTL). The 28 lakes sampled as part of the Regional Lake Survey have been sampled by at least four of these regional surveys including the 1920s Birge and Juday sampling efforts. These 28 lakes were selected to represent a gradient of landscape position and shoreline development, both of which are important factors influencing social and ecological dynamics of lakes in the NHLD. This long-term regional dataset will lead to a greater understanding of whether and how large-scale drivers such as climate change and variability, lakeshore residential development, introductions of invasive species, or forest management have altered regional water chemistry. Zooplankton samples were taken at approximately the deepest part of each lake, via a vertical tow with a Wisconsin net. Count of individuals and presence absence data for all lakes in study region are provided here.
Contact
Core Areas
Dataset ID
381
Date Range
-
Maintenance
ongoing
Methods
Each zooplankton sample was taken at approximately the deepest part of each lake, via a vertical tow with a Wisconsin net (20cm diameter mouth, 80µ mesh) lowered to 1 meter above the bottom of a lake and then pulled up slowly at a rate of about 3 seconds per meter. Contents of the net were preserved in 4-oz jars with 95% ethanol. One sample was taken from each lake. Samples were collected by the Regional Lakes summer sampling crew in June 2015.
Version Number
1

Wisconsin creel dataset as well as predictor variables for lakes from 1990 to 2017 to estimate statewide recreational fisheries harvest

Abstract
Recreational fisheries have high economic worth, valued at $190B globally. An important, but underappreciated, secondary value of recreational catch is its role as a source of food. This contribution is poorly understood due to difficulty in estimating recreational harvest at spatial scales beyond an individual system, as traditionally estimated from angler creel surveys. Here, we address this gap using a 28-year creel survey of ~300 Wisconsin inland lakes. We develop a statistical model of recreational harvest for individual lakes and then scale-up to unsurveyed lakes (3769 lakes; 73% of statewide lake surface area) to generate a statewide estimate of recreational lake harvest of ~4200 t and an estimated annual angler consumption rate of ~3 kg, nearly double estimated United States per capita freshwater fish consumption. Recreational fishing harvest makes significant contributions to human diets, is critical for discussions on food security, and the multiple ecosystem services of freshwater systems.
Contact
Core Areas
Dataset ID
379
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Methods
The state of Wisconsin is comprised of about 15,000 inland lakes ranging from 0.5 to 53,394 ha (WDNR 2009). Most lakes occur in the northern and eastern part of the state as a result of glaciation. about 3,620 lakes are greater than 20 ha and together comprise about 93% of the state's inland lake surface area (Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources 2009). Wisconsin lakes constitute a wide range of physical and biological characteristics. Wisconsin inland lakes support valuable recreational fisheries for a variety of species, including Walleye (Sander vitreus), Northern Pike (Esox lucius), Muskellunge (Esox masquinongy), Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens), Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides), Smallmouth Bass (Micropterus dolomieu), Lake Sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), and a variety of sunfish species (Lepomis spp.).
Version Number
2

North Temperate Lakes LTER Zooplankton conversion formulas length to biomass

Abstract
Formulas for calculating zooplankton biomass based on measured length for species encountered in NTL's northern lakes. Formulas are either based on literature reports or measurements in particular research lakes.
Core Areas
Dataset ID
376
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
completed
Methods
formulas are based on data in literature or were determined in samples from research lakes:

Culver D.A. et.al. 1985. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. Vol 42, 1380-1390.
Biomass of freshwater crustacean zooplankton from length-weight regressions.

Downing, John A. and Frank H. rigler. 1984.
A manual on methods for the assessment of secondary productivity in fresh waters. Second edition.

Dumont, H.J., I. Van de Velde and S. Dumont. Ref??
The dry weight estimate of biomass in a selection of cladocera, copepoda and rotifera from the plankton, periphyton and benthos of continental waters.

Hawkins, Bethany E. and M.S. Evans. 1979. J.Great Lakes Res. 5(3-4):256-263
Seasonal cycles of zooplankton biomass in southeastern Lake Michigan

Lawrence, S.G., D.F. Malley, W.J. Findlay, M.A. MacIver and I.L. Delbaere. 1987. Can J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 44: 264-274.
Methods for estimating dry weight of freshwater planktonic crustaceans from measures of length and shape.

Pace M.L. and J.D. Orcutt. 1981. Limnol. Oceanogr. 26(5), 822-830.
The relative importance of protozoans, rotifers, and crustaceans in a freshwater zooplankton community.

Yan N.D. and G.L. Mackie. 1987. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. Vol 44, 382-389.
Improved estimation of the dry weight of Holopedium gibberum using clutch size, a body fat index, and lake water total phosphorus concentration.

Ruttner-Kolisko A. 1977. Arch. Hydrobiol. Beih. Ergebn. Limnol. 8, 71-76.
Suggestions for biomass calculations of plankton rotifers.
Version Number
1

Cascade project at North Temperate Lakes LTER - Daily data for key variables in whole lake experiments on early warnings of critical transitions, Paul and Peter Lakes, 2008-2011

Abstract
Peter Lake's food web was altered by adding largemouth bass at a slow rate while monitoring key food web constituents including littoral minnow abundance indexed as catch per trap per hour, zooplankton biomass, and concentration of chlorophyll a. Paul Lake was manipulated and the same variables were measured there.
In Peter Lake, we expected littoral catch of minnows to first increase as minnows moved into the littoral zone due to the threat of bass predation and then decrease due to bass predation. We expected zooplankton biomass to increase as minnows moved into the littoral zone. We expected chlorophyll to decrease due to increased grazing by zooplankton. We expected that variance and autocorrelation of chlorophyll would increase as the food web passed a critical transition.
We expected that the time series in Paul Lake would represent the normal variability of an unmanipulated lake
Dataset ID
374
Date Range
-
Methods
Primary publications that provide more information about taxa, methods, and data are:
Carpenter, S.R., J.J. Cole, M.L. Pace, R.D. Batt, W.A. Brock, T. Cline, J. Coloso, J.R. Hodgson, J.F. Kitchell, D.A. Seekell, L. Smith and B. Weidel. 2011. Early warnings of regime shifts: A whole-ecosystem experiment. Science 332: 1079-1082.
Cline, T.J., D. A. Seekell, S. R. Carpenter, M. L. Pace, J. R. Hodgson, J. F. Kitchell, and B. C. Weidel 2014. Early warnings of regime shifts: evaluation of spatial indicators from a whole-ecosystem experiment. Ecosphere 5:art102. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES13-00398.1
Pace, M.L., S.R. Carpenter, R.A. Johnson and J. T. Kurzweil. 2013. Zooplankton provide early warnings of a regime shift in a whole-lake manipulation. Limnology and Oceanography 58: 525-532.
For an explanation of our rationale and expected results see:
Carpenter, S. R., Brock, W. A., Cole, J. J., Kitchell, J. F., & Pace, M. L. 2008. Leading indicators of trophic cascades. Ecology Letters, 11(2), 128-138. doi:DOI 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2007.01131.x
Version Number
2

Production, biomass, and yield estimates for walleye populations in the Ceded Territory of Wisconsin from 1990-2017

Abstract
Recreational fisheries are valued at $190B globally and constitute the predominant use of wild fish stocks in developed countries, with inland systems contributing the dominant fraction of recreational fisheries. Although inland recreational fisheries are thought to be highly resilient and self-regulating, the rapid pace of environmental change is increasing the vulnerability of these fisheries to overharvest and collapse. We evaluate an approach for detecting hidden overharvest of inland recreational fisheries based on empirical comparisons of harvest and biomass production. Using an extensive 28-year dataset of the walleye fisheries in Northern Wisconsin, USA, we compare empirical biomass harvest (Y) and calculated production (P) and biomass (B) for 390 lake-year combinations. Overharvest occurs when harvest exceeds production in that year. Biomass and biomass turnover (P/B) both declined by about 30% and about 20% over time while biomass harvest did not change, causing overharvest to increase. Our analysis revealed 40% of populations were production-overharvested, a rate about 10x higher than current estimates based on numerical harvest used by fisheries managers. Our study highlights the need for novel approaches to evaluate and conserve inland fisheries in the face of global change.
Contact
Core Areas
Dataset ID
373
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Methods
All methods describing the calculation of these data can be found in Embke et al. (in review)
Version Number
1

Cascade project at North Temperate Lakes LTER - Daily Chlorophyll Data for Whole Lake Nutrient Additions 2013-2015

Abstract
Daily chlorophyll for surface water samples in Paul, Peter, and Tuesday lakes from mid-May to early September for the years 2013, 2014 and 2015. Inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus were added to Peter and Tuesday lakes each year while Paul Lake was an unfertilized reference.
Contact
Core Areas
Dataset ID
372
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Methods
Methods are described in Wilkinson et al. 2018 (Ecological Monographs 88:188-203) and Pace et al. 2017 (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 114: 352-357). These publications including supplements should be consulted for details.

Version Number
1

Long-term fish size data for Wisconsin Lakes Department of Natural Resources and North Temperate Lakes LTER 1944 - 2012

Abstract
This dataset describes long-term (1944-2012) variations in individual fish total lengths from Wisconsin lakes. The dataset includes information on 1.9 million individual fish, representing 19 species. Data were collected by Wisconsin Department of Natural Resource fisheries biologists as part of routine lake fisheries assessments. Individual survey methodologies varied over space and time and are described in more detail by Rypel, A. et al., 2016. Seventy-Year Retrospective on Size-Structure Changes in the Recreational Fisheries of Wisconsin. Fisheries, 41, pp.230-243. Available at: http://afs.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03632415.2016.1160894
Contact
Core Areas
Creator
Dataset ID
357
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Methods
Fisheries surveys of inland lakes and streams in Wisconsin have been conducted by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) professionals and its predecessor the Wisconsin Conservation Department for >70 y. Standard fyke net and boat electrofishing surveys tend to dominate the fisheries surveys and data collected. Most fyke net data on certain species (e.g., Walleye Sander vitreus and Muskellunge Esox masquinongy) originates from annual spring netting surveys following ice-out. These data are used for abundance estimates, mark and recapture surveys for estimating population sizes, and egg-take procedures for the hatcheries. Boat-mounted boom and mini-boom electrofishing surveys became increasingly common in the late 1950s and 1960s. Boat electrofishing surveys have typically been conducted during early summer months (May and June), but some electrofishing survey data are also collected in early spring as part of walleye and muskellunge mark-recapture surveys. Summer fyke netting surveys have been collected more sporadically over time, but were once more commonly used as a panfish survey methodology. Surveys were largely non-standardized. Thus, future users and statistical comparisons utilizing these data should acknowledge the non-standard nature of their collection. More in-depth description of these data can be found in Rypel, A. et al., 2016. Seventy-Year Retrospective on Size-Structure Changes in the Recreational Fisheries of Wisconsin. Fisheries, 41, pp.230-243. Available at: http://afs.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03632415.2016.1160894
Version Number
3

Long-term fish abundance data for Wisconsin Lakes Department of Natural Resources and North Temperate Lakes LTER 1944 - 2012

Abstract
This dataset describes long-term (1944-2012) variations in the relative abundance of fish populations representing nine species in Wisconsin lakes. Data were collected by Wisconsin Department of Natural Resource fisheries biologists as part of routine lake fisheries assessments. Individual survey methodologies varied over space and time and are described in more detail by Rypel, A. et al., 2016. Seventy-Year Retrospective on Size-Structure Changes in the Recreational Fisheries of Wisconsin. Fisheries, 41, pp.230-243. Available at: http://afs.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03632415.2016.1160894
Contact
Core Areas
Creator
Dataset ID
356
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Methods
Fisheries surveys of inland lakes and streams in Wisconsin have been conducted by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) professionals and its predecessor the Wisconsin Conservation Department for >70 y. Standard fyke net and boat electrofishing surveys tend to dominate the fisheries surveys and data collected. Most fyke net data on certain species (e.g., Walleye Sander vitreus and Muskellunge Esox masquinongy) originates from annual spring netting surveys following ice-out. These data are used for abundance estimates, mark and recapture surveys for estimating population sizes, and egg-take procedures for the hatcheries. Boat-mounted boom and mini-boom electrofishing surveys became increasingly common in the late 1950s and 1960s. Boat electrofishing surveys have typically been conducted during early summer months (May and June), but some electrofishing survey data are also collected in early spring as part of walleye and muskellunge mark-recapture surveys. Summer fyke netting surveys have been collected more sporadically over time, but were once more commonly used as a panfish survey methodology. Surveys were largely non-standardized. Thus, future users and statistical comparisons utilizing these data should acknowledge the non-standard nature of their collection. More in-depth description of these data can be found in Rypel, A. et al., 2016. Seventy-Year Retrospective on Size-Structure Changes in the Recreational Fisheries of Wisconsin. Fisheries, 41, pp.230-243. Available at: http://afs.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03632415.2016.1160894
Version Number
5

Cascade Project at North Temperate Lakes LTER Core Data Zooplankton 1984 - 2016

Abstract
Zooplankton data from 1984-2016. Sampled approximately weekly with two net hauls through the water column (30 cm diameter net, 80 um mesh). There have been over eight zooplankton counters during this period, so species-level identifications (TAX, below) are not as consistent as those for some of the other datasets. Sampling Frequency: varies; Number of sites: 8
Core Areas
Dataset ID
355
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Methods
Sampling:
Zooplankton were sampled approximately weekly with two net hauls through the water column (30 cm diameter net, 80 um mesh). Tows were taken at standard depths for almost all years. The standard depths are as follows: Peter, East Long, West Long, Crampton and Tuesday Lakes: 12m, Paul Lake: 8m, Ward Lake: 6m; exceptions are: for 2012 and beyond Tuesday Lake was sampled at 10m, Peter was sampled at 10m from 1984-1986, Paul was sampled at 7.5m in 1995. Samples were preserved with cold sugared formalin or Lugol's solution.
Version Number
16

Cascade Project at North Temperate Lakes LTER Core Data Process Data 1984 - 2016

Abstract
Data useful for calculating and evaluating primary production processes were collected from 6 lakes from 1984-2016. Chlorophyll a and pheophytin were measured by the same fluorometric method from 1984-2016. In some years chlorophyll and pheophytin were separated into size fractions (total, and a ‘small’ fraction that passed a 35 um mesh screen). Primary production was measured by the 14C method from 1984-1998. Dissolved inorganic carbon for primary production calculation was calculated from Gran alkalinity titration and air-equilibrated pH until 1987 when this method was replaced by gas chromatography. Until 1995 alkaline phosphatase activity was measured as an indicator of phosphorus deficiency.
Core Areas
Dataset ID
354
Date Range
-
Methods
General: Bade, D., J. Houser, and S. Scanga (editors). 1998. Methods of the Cascading Trophic Interactions Project. 5th edition. Center for Limnology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, NY.
Version Number
14
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