US Long-Term Ecological Research Network

Cascade Project at North Temperate Lakes LTER Core Data Phytoplankton 1984 - 2015

Abstract
Data on epilimnetic phytoplankton from 1984-2015, determined by light microscopy from pooled Van Dorn samples at 100 percent, 50 percent, and 25 percent of surface irradiance. St. Amand (1990) and Cottingham (1996) describe the counting protocols in detail. Samples after 1995 were counted by Phycotech Inc. (http://www.phycotech.com). Sampling Frequency: varies; Number of sites: 5
Dataset ID
353
Date Range
-
Methods
Samples counted prior to 1996 were assigned one taxon name with all taxonomic information. This taxon name was split into distinct columns of genus, species and description for archival as best possible. Samples from 2013-2015 were sent to Phycotech inc. (http://www.phycotech.com/) to be counted.
Version Number
16

Cascade Project at North Temperate Lakes LTER Core Data Physical and Chemical Limnology 1984 - 2016

Abstract
Physical and chemical variables are measured at one central station near the deepest point of each lake. In most cases these measurements are made in the morning (0800 to 0900). Vertical profiles are taken at varied depth intervals. Chemical measurements are sometimes made in a pooled mixed layer sample (PML); sometimes in the epilimnion, metalimnion, and hypolimnion; and sometimes in vertical profiles. In the latter case, depths for sampling usually correspond to the surface plus depths of 50percent, 25percent, 10percent, 5percent and 1percent of surface irradiance.
Dataset ID
352
Date Range
-
Methods
Methods for 1984-1990 were described by Carpenter and Kitchell (1993) and methods for 1991-1997 were described by Carpenter et al. (2001).
Version Number
14

Cascade Project at North Temperate Lakes LTER Core Data Nutrients 1991 - 2016

Abstract
Physical and chemical variables are measured at one central station near the deepest point of each lake. In most cases these measurements are made in the morning (0800 to 0900). Vertical profiles are taken at varied depth intervals. Chemical measurements are sometimes made in a pooled mixed layer sample (PML); sometimes in the epilimnion, metalimnion, and hypolimnion; and sometimes in vertical profiles. In the latter case, depths for sampling usually correspond to the surface plus depths of 50percent, 25percent, 10percent, 5percent and 1percent of surface irradiance. The 1991-1999 chemistry data was obtained from the Lachat auto-analyzer. Like the process data, there are up to seven samples per sampling date due to Van Dorn collections across a depth interval according to percent irradiance. Voichick and LeBouton (1994) describe the autoanalyzer procedures in detail. Nutrient samples were sent to the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies for analysis beginning in 2000. The Kjeldahl method for measuring nitrogen is not used at IES, and so measurements reported from 2000 onwards are Total Nitrogen.
Core Areas
Dataset ID
351
Date Range
-
Methods
Methods for 1984-1990 were described by Carpenter and Kitchell (1993) and methods for 1991-1997 were described by Carpenter et al. (2001).
Version Number
14

Microbial Observatory at North Temperate Lakes LTER Summary of Microbial Activity 2000 - 2002

Abstract
Summary of Microbial Observatory data from the bacterial production, planktonic respiration and alakline phosphatase activity databases, plus bacterial cell counts from epifluorescence microscopy using DAPI cell stain. Information on integrated sample depth and incubation temperature is also included Sampling Frequency: fortnightly during ice-free season - every 6 weeks during ice-covered season Number of sites: 4
Core Areas
Dataset ID
46
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
this is a summary dataset based on knb-lter-ntl.45, knb-later-ntl.50, and knb-lter-ntl.51 where the methods are described in detail. in addition bacterial cell counts were optained from epifluorescence microscopy using DAPI cell stain.
Short Name
MOACT2
Version Number
4

Landscape Position Project at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Fish Growth and Mercury Contaminant Data 1998 - 1999

Abstract
As part of the Landscape Position Project, yellow perch were collected for mercury and isotope analysis by a combination of angling, beach seining, vertical gill net, fyke net and electrofishing in the summers of 1998 and 1999. A total of 86 yellow perch from 25 lakes were analyzed. Scales were used to determine age and length at ages 1 to 3 years. The nitrogen stable isotope signature indicates the relative food-web position of the fish relative to cladocerans collected from the same lake. The N_SIGNATURE value divided by 3.2 gives trophic position relative to cladoceran Sampling Frequency: one survey on each lake in late June through late July of 1998 or 1999 Number of sites: 25
Dataset ID
98
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
As part of the Landscape Position Project, yellow perch were collected for mercury and isotope analysis by a combination of angling, beach seining, vertical gill net, fyke net and electrofishing in the summers of 1998 and 1999. A total of 86 yellow perch from 25 lakes were analyzed. Scales were used to determine age and length at ages 1 to 3 years. The nitrogen stable isotope signature indicates the relative food-web position of the fish relative to cladocerans collected from the same lake. The N_SIGNATURE value divided by 3.2 gives trophic position relative to cladoceran Sampling Frequency: one survey on each lake in late June through late July of 1998 or 1999 Number of sites: 25
Short Name
LPPCOM1
Version Number
8

Landscape Position Project at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Chlorophyll 1998 - 2000

Abstract
Parameters characterizing the chemical limnology and spatial attributes of 49 lakes were surveyed as part of the Landscape Position Project. Most parameters are measured at or close to the deepest part of the lake. Chlorophyll is measured by collecting separate integrated samples from the epilimnion, metalimnion, and hypolimnion Sampling Frequency: generally monthly for one summer; for some lakes, one or two samples in one summer Number of sites: 51
Core Areas
Dataset ID
92
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Chlorophyll is measured by collecting separate integrated samples from the epilimnion, metalimnion, and hypolimnion
Short Name
LPPCHL1
Version Number
8

Landscape Position Project at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Aquatic Macrophytesn 1998 - 1999

Abstract
Submersed and floating macrophytes were surveyed along transects running perpendicular to shore at two sites representative of muck (organic) and sand substrate macrophyte communities. Data were collected by Karen A. Wilson as part of her PhD work in Northern Wisconsin, (Vilas and Onieda Counties) during July and August of 1998 and 1999. Details of field collections can be found in Wilson, K.A. 2002. Impacts of the invasive rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) in northern Wisconsin lakes. Ph.D. Dissertation. University of Wisconsin, Madison. Number of sites: 30 lakes; 2 sites per lake
Core Areas
Creator
Dataset ID
109
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Details of field collections can be found in Wilson, K.A. 2002. Impacts of the invasive rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) in northern Wisconsin lakes. Ph.D. Dissertation. University of Wisconsin, Madison.
Short Name
LPPMACR
Version Number
21

Landscape Position Project at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Benthic Invertebrate Abundance 1998 - 1999

Abstract
Benthic invertebrate assemblages of 32 lakes were surveyed as part of the Landscape Position Project. We used modified Hester-Dendy colonization substrates to sample benthic invertebrate communities. Each sampling device consisted of a 3"x3" top plate, alternating layers of course and fine mesh, a ''choreboy'' commercial scrubbing puff, alternating layers of coarse (6.35 mm) and fine (3.18 mm) black plastic mesh, and a 3"x3" bottom plate. Two Hester-Dendy samplers were set at a depth of one meter on each of three substrate types (cobble, sand and silt) within each lake for four weeks in late June through late July in either 1998 or 1999. Within each lake, areas of different substrate types were identified using WI-DNR depth contour lake maps, and substrate type was verified by direct observation. Different substrates were sampled to account for invertebrate associations with specific substrate characteristics. Lake order was determined using a modification of the method of Riera et al. (2000). Lake order is a numerical surrogate for groundwater influx and hydrological position along a drainage network, with the highest number indicating the lake lowest in a watershed. Riera, Joan L., John J. Magnuson, Tim K. Kratz, and Katherine E. Webster. 2000. A geomorphic template for the analysis of lake districts applied to Northern Highland Lake District, Wisconsin, U.S.A. Freshwater Biology 43:301-18. Sampling Frequency: one survey on each lake in late June through late July of 1998 or 1999 Number of sites: 32
Core Areas
Dataset ID
96
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
We used modified Hester-Dendy colonization substrates to sample benthic invertebrate communities. Each sampling device consisted of a 3"x3" top plate, alternating layers of course and fine mesh, a choreboy commercial scrubbing puff, alternating layers of coarse (6.35 mm) and fine (3.18 mm) black plastic mesh, and a 3"x3" bottom plate. Two Hester-Dendy samplers were set at a depth of one meter on each of three substrate types (cobble, sand and silt) within each lake for four weeks in late June through late July in either 1998 or 1999. Within each lake, areas of different substrate types were identified using WI-DNR depth contour lake maps, and substrate type was verified by direct observation. Different substrates were sampled to account for invertebrate associations with specific substrate characteristics. Lake order was determined using a modification of the method of Riera et al. (2000). Lake order is a numerical surrogate for groundwater influx and hydrological position along a drainage network, with the highest number indicating the lake lowest in a watershed. Riera, Joan L., John J. Magnuson, Tim K. Kratz, and Katherine E. Webster. 2000. A geomorphic template for the analysis of lake districts applied to Northern Highland Lake District, Wisconsin, U.S.A. Freshwater Biology 43:301-18. Sampling Frequency: one survey on each lake in late June through late July of 1998 or 1999 Number of sites: 32
Short Name
LPPINVA1
Version Number
6

Landscape Position Project at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Chemical Limnology 1998 - 2000

Abstract
Parameters characterizing the chemical limnology and spatial attributes of 51 lakes were surveyed as part of the Landscape Position Project. Parameters are measured at or close to the deepest part of the lake. The following parameters are measured one meter from the surface and two meters from the bottom of the lake: pH, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, total silica. The following parameters are measured one meter from the surface: dissolved organic carbon, total organic carbon, dissolved inorganic carbon, total inorganic carbon, spectrophotometric absorbance (color scan), major anions and cations, alkalinity. Sampling Frequency: once for conservative parameters (major ions, carbon, color, alkalinity); monthly for one summer for other parameters (chlorophyll, nitrogen, phosphorus, pH, silica, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and conductivity) Number of sites: 51Allequash Lake, Anderson Lake, Arrowhead Lake, Beaver Lake, Big Lake, Big Crooked Lake, Big Gibson Lake, Big Muskellunge Lake, Boulder Lake, Brandy Lake, Crampton Lake, Crystal Lake, Diamond Lake, Flora Lake, Heart Lake, Ike Walton Lake, Island Lake, Johnson Lake, Katherine Lake, Kathleen Lake, Katinka Lake, Lehto Lake, Little Crooked Lake, Little Muskie, Little Spider Lake, Little Sugarbush Lake, Little Trout Lake, Lower Kaubeshine Lake, Lynx Lake, McCullough Lake, Mid Lake, Minocqua Lake, Muskesin Lake, Nixon Lake, Partridge Lake, Randall Lake, Round Lake, Sanford Lake, Sparkling Lake, Statenaker Lake, Stearns Lake, Tomahawk Lake, Trout Lake, Upper Kaubeshine Lake, Verna Lake, Ward Lake, White Birch Lake, White Sand Lake, Wild Rice Lake, Wildcat Lake, Wolf Lake, Vilas County, WI, Iron County, WI, Oneida County, WI, Gogebic County, MI, USA
Dataset ID
91
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Chloride, SulfateSamples for chloride and sulfate are collected together with a peristaltic pump and tubing and in-line filtered (through a 0.40 micron polycarbonate filter) into new, 20 ml HDPE plastic containers with conical caps. The samples are stored refrigerated at 4 degrees Celsius until analysis, which should occur within 6 months. The samples are analyzed for chloride (and sulfate) simultaneously by Ion Chromatography, using a hydroxide eluent.The detection limit for chloride is approximately 0.01 ppm and the analytical range for the method extends to 100 ppm.The detection limit for sulfate is approximately 0.01 ppm and the analytical range for the method extends to 60 ppm.Method Log: Prior to January 1998 samples, chloride was determined on a Dionex DX10 Ion Chromatograph, using a chemical fiber suppressor. From 1998 to 2011, chloride was determined by a Dionex model DX500, using an electro-chemical suppressor. From January 2011 until present, chloride is determined by a Dionex model ICS 2100 using an electro-chemical suppressor.Calcium, silicon, magnesium, sodium, potassium, iron, and manganeseSamples for calcium analysis (as well as dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus, silicon, magnesium, sodium, potassium, iron, and manganese) are collected together with a peristaltic pump and tubing and in-line filtered (through a 40 micron polycarbonate filter) into 120 ml LDPE bottles and acidified to a 1percent HCl matrix by adding 1 ml of ultra pure concentrated HCl to 100 mls of sample. For every sample acidification event, three acid blanks are created by adding the same acid used on the samples to 100 mls of ultra pure water supplied from the lab. Once acidified, the samples are stable at room temperature until analysis, which should occur within one year. Until acidification, the samples should be refrigerated at 4 degrees Celsius.Calcium, as well as magnesium, sodium, potassium, iron, and manganese are analyzed simultaneously on an optical inductively-coupled plasma emission spectrophotometer (ICP-OES). The acidified samples are directly aspirated into the instrument without a digestion. Calcium is analyzed at 317.933 nm and at 315.887 nm and viewed axially for low-level analysis and radially for high level analysis.The detection limit for calcium is 0.06 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 50 ppm.The detection limit for iron is 0.02 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 20 ppm.The detection limit for magnesium is 0.03 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 50 ppm.The detection limit for manganese is 0.01 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 2 ppm.The detection limit for potassium is 0.06 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 10 ppm.The detection limit for sodium is 0.06 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 50 ppm.Method Log: Prior to January 2002, Calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, iron, and manganese were determined on a Perkin-Elmer model 503 Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. Lanthanum at a 0.8percent concentration was added as a matrix modifier to suppress chemical interferences. From January 2002 to present, samples are analyzed for calcium on a Perkin-Elmer model 4300 DV ICP.Dissolved reactive silica is determined by the Heteropoly Blue Method and the absorption is measured at 820 nm.The detection limit for silicon is 6 ppb and the analytical range is 15000 ppb.Method Log These determinations were performed manually using a Bausch and Lomb Spectrophotometer from the beginning of the project until April 1984. From 1984 through 2005, dissolved reactive silicon was determined on a Technicon Auto Analyzer II. From January 2006 to present, samples are run on an Astoria-Pacific Astoria II Autoanalyzer.
Short Name
LPPCHEM1
Version Number
9

Cascade Project at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Process Data 1984 - 2007

Abstract
Data on chlorophyll, primary productivity, and alkaline phosphatase activity from 1984-2007. Samples were collected with a Van Dorn bottle at 6 depths determined from the percent of surface irradiance (100%, 50%, 25%, 10%, 5% and 1%) and in the hypolimnion (12 m in Peter, East Long, West Long, and Tuesday lakes; 9 m in Paul Lake; and 4.5 m in Central Long Lake). Sampling Frequency: varies Number of sites: 8
Core Areas
Dataset ID
73
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
CHLOROPHYLL a ANALYSISEQUIPMENT: Film canistersTurner 450 Fluorometer fitted with:1. Quartz-halogen lamp2. Emission filter -SC6653. Excitation filter -NB44047mm Whatman GForF filters12 x 75 mm disposable glass culture cuvettes (Do not reuse cuvettes!)1-5 mL Oxford pipettorFinnpipette Stepper Pipetter with 5 mL tiptimestimesNOTEtimestimes-Change filters with fluorometer off! (Remember that chlorophyll analysis filters are different from APA analysis filters.)-Make sure Fluorometer has been calibrated for chlorophyll a (see Fluorometer Calibration for Chlorophyll a Analysis).REAGENTS: 100percent Methanol, spectrophotometric gradeCAUTION - wear gloves whenever you use methanol.0.1 N HCLEthidium Bromide Stock 3 standard (40microM solution)PROCEDURE:A. Filter water samples from each of the 6 light-depths onto a 47 mm GForF filter.1. Filters have a grid side and a smooth side. Place filter smooth side up.2. Shake sample bottle well before filtering (do this after the DIC sample has been taken from the same bottle.)3. For each depth, filter enough water so there is a faint color on the filter. For our lakes this ranges between 100-300ml. Record the volume filtered. Make sure you filer at less than 200 mm Hg pressure.4. Rinse filter towers and filters with DI water, place filters in labeled film canisters and place in freezer. Labels should include lake, date, and depth ID.5. If measuring edible chlorophyll as well, repeat steps 1-4 above, but first filter the sample through 35 microm mesh. (This has not been done since 2001, inclusive.)B. Extraction - DO IN DIM LIGHT and WEAR GLOVES!!1. Remove one tray of film canisters from the freezer. Extract chlorophyll by adding 25 mL 100percent MeOH to each film canister. If using re-pipettor, verify dispensed volume. (Record extraction volume if different from 25 mL.) Note the extraction time for each group of samples.2. Re-cap and place canisters in refrigerator to extract for exactly 24 hours (in the dark).3 Repeat steps 1 and 2 for all trays that have been in the freezer more than 24 hours.C. FluorometryCalibration of the fluorometer using a chlorophyll standard is typically performed at the beginning of the field season, or when a bulb is changed. Calibration using Ethidium Bromide is done at the beginning of each sample set.1. Insert correct filters in fluorometer while fluorometer is off. (Emission filter -SC665, Excitation filter -NB440), and warm it up for 1 hour .2. TURN LIGHTS OUT. Chlorophylls must be read in low light and samples must be kept cool. Do not remove film canisters from the refrigerator until you are ready to process the samples.3. Place clean cuvettes into a labeled rack (12 cuvettes per rack). Remove one lake-day of film canisters from the refrigerator.4. Place Ethidium Bromide Stock 3 standard into fluorometer and record reading on datasheet. Then, turn the span knob until the reading is 908. Record this on the datasheet.5. Shake film canister, remove the lid, and rinse the pipette tip with 2.5 mL of the sample. Then remove 2.5 mL of sample and place in cuvette.times Repeat for all film canisters.6. Pipette 2.5 mL of 100percent methanol into a cuvette for the blank and use it to zero the fluorometer. Choose a gain and turn the zero knob until the fluorometer reads 000. You must zero the machine every time you change gains.7. Remove the first sample cuvette from the rack, wipe with a Kimwipe, and place in fluorometer. Record the gain and the fluorescence before acidification, Fb. Repeat for all 12 cuvettes in the rack. Readings should be between about 200 and 1000. If not, adjust the gain and re-zero.8. Acidify each cuvette with 100 microL 0.0773 N HCl using the repeating pipetter and mix (hold the top of the cuvette securely, then "thump" the bottom several times). Check for condensation on the outside of the cuvettes, and wipe with a Kimwipe if necessary. Wait about 1 min from the acidification of the first cuvette.9. Record the fluorescence after acidification for all 12 cuvettes. VERY IMPORTANT: Make sure you read the Fb and Fa values for each sample on the same gain.10. Remove a new lake-day batch of film canisters from the refrigerator and repeat steps 3-9.times if particulate matter is present, centrifuge sample for 10 min. and use supernatant.D. Clean Up: DO THIS UNDER THE HOOD!1. Dump methanol solution from cuvettes and film canisters into a metal tray. Place the film canisters and lids in a separate tray. Position them in one layer on the tray with their openings facing up. Leave the trays under the hood overnight to evaporate the methanol.REFERENCES:Marker, A.F.H., C.A. Crowther, and R.J.M. Gunn. 1980. Methanol and acetone as solvents for estimating chlorophyll a and phaeopigments by spectrophotometry. Arch. Hydrobiol. Beih. Ergebn. Limnol 14: 52-69.Strickland, J.H. and T.R. Parsons. 1968. A practical handbook of seawater analysis. Fish. Res. Brd. Can. Bulletin 167.pp. 201-206.Holm-Hansen, O. 1978. Chlorophyll a determination: improvements in methodology. Oikos 30:438-447.
Short Name
CPROC1
Version Number
6
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