People

 

The Artists

John Bates

John Bates
manitowish@centurytel.net
A place is nothing more than a space with a story. My poetry is an attempt to distill and celebrate some of this area’s many stories in the hope that people will feel a deeper reverence for the Northwoods. Because without reverence, without a feeling that all life is genuinely sacred, we, and the Earth, don’t stand much of a chance.

Mary Burns

Mary Burns
manitowish@centurytel.net
Mary Burns expresses her love of northern woodlands and waters in her weavings and writings. An award-winning weaver, her work resides in private homes across the United States. She weaves custom designed hand-woven rugs and wall pieces; she also creates tapestries and felted work. Her newest loom, a Jacquard TC-1 named Nora, allows her to craft her work in even greater detail, vibrancy, and character. Her looms range in width from 10” to 10’.
I am influenced greatly by the world around me, from the many shades of green of the northern forests, to the blue moods of Lake Superior, to the pristine Manitowish River that meanders outside my door.
As a fiber artist, I work with textural and visual elements in all of my weavings. Rock art from the Great Lakes Basin to ancient Irish petroglyphs have inspired many of my recent designs. I have interpreted megalithic structures, cultural legends, and Celtic knot work, many of these containing elements of sacred symbols and sites.

Terry Daulton

Terry Daulton
tdaulton@centurytel.net
I have the good fortune to work both as a field biologist and artist. I find inspiration in the lakes and forests of the northwoods. For "Drawing Water" I created a series of pastel paintings inspired by the poster art of early 1900's artists. In my posters I want to explore the idea of the "invisible present" that Dr. John Magnusun has cited in some of his presentations on lakes and climate change. In thinking about the future of our lakes, I want to encourage citizens to learn more about the complexity of lakes that is often "invisible", and from this basis in the present, to encourage them to consider their hopes for the future of northern lakes and ways that they can make that future more secure.

Leslie Fedorchuk

An artist and educator who has been working in the genre of alternative processes and artists' books for the past twenty-five years. I earned a BFA from University of Michigan and an MFA at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. In addition, I completed further graduate study in theology at St. Francis Seminary.
My written and visual work deals with issues of autobiography, memory, and place narratives. I've exhibited both nationally and internationally and have work in many private and public collections including the Milwaukee Public Library, The Tweed Museum of Art, Special Collections – UW Milwaukee, and the Museum of Modern Art.

Helen Klebesadel

Helen Klebesadel

Helen Klebesadel is an artist, an educator, and an activist. Born and raised in rural Wisconsin, her art has become the place where she explores how we learn our deepest values.   Best known for her environmental and women centered watercolors,  she is particularly interested in how myths and stories socialize us to have different expectations for some people than from others. She uses the creative process to re-examine and re-present narratives that resist and contest existing power structures by revealing they exist.

Bonnie Peterson

Bonnie Peterson
writebon@bonniepeterson.com
My artwork chronicles my adventures in the wilderness and through life. I use embroidery and stitching to communicate environmental and social issues. The process involves many hours of research into historic documents, maps, journals and scientific research. In this work I present some of the science and context inherent in lake chemistry, climate change and demographics, using an unusual presentation of scientific graphs, dictionary definitions, and representations of limnology concepts.

Jim Ramsdell
jim@OurSharedPlanet.org
The collaboration of artists and scientists for the LTEArts Drawing Water exhibit gave me a whole new perspective on lakes, their health, and habitats. It truly connected me with the gifts and importance provided by these blue jewels spread throughout the Northland.
Being an environmentalist and wildlife artist, I was especially interested in what we learned about woody debris (habitat) and its importance to the health of lakes and all the creatures who inhabit them.


Jeff Richter

Jeff Richter
Jeff Richter's journey with film and camera began almost 20 years ago with a walk through Tom Mangelson's gallery in Jackson, Wyoming, that inspired him to take up the camera and teach himself the art and craft of nature photography. Jeff has had hundreds of images appearing in print since then. Sierra Club, Audubon, The Nature Conservancy, NorthWord Press, Brown Trout, Willow Creek, Wisconsin Trails Magazine, Milwaukee Journal/Sentinel and LoonWatch are among the publishers and organizations that have used Jeff's images.

Melinda Schnell
mschnell@centurytel.net
I moved to Wisconsin after my husband introduced me to the Northwoods. We were both living in Chicago and I fell in love with everything about the area, it wasn't long before I started spending most of my time here. My art school education focused on fine art with a graphic art minor, at that time I could never have imagined that underwater landscapes featuring fish would become a theme of my watercolors. Years ago, I was commissioned by a good friend to paint a walleye picture for her husband who is a well known fishing guide. I discovered that watercolor and the subject could not be better suited; that painting set the wheels in motion. I try to use my artistic skills to give the viewer the impression of being underwater, a fleeting glimpse of that other world that lies just below the surface.


Ann Singsaas
asingsaas@hotmail.com
In 1991, Ann received her B.A. from Concordia College with majors in Biology, Chemistry and Art. She continued on to studying painting at the University Illinois and Eastern Michigan University. With a micro-studio in Stevens Point Wisconsin, she exhibits in several states and is represented by several Wisconsin galleries. She currently teaches workshops in drawing and painting throughout the Midwest.
I enjoy playing with all the elements of art. Composition, contrast, line, texture, rhythm, repetition, value, form and color contain infinite possibilities and allow me to work on several series simultaneously. Thought different in appearance, each series informs the other. Often a series will start with one of these elements.

Heather Swan
swan2347@gmail.com
Heather Swan is a writer whose poetry has appeared in such journals as The Raleigh Review, Poet Lore, Basalt, and The Cream City Review, and whose nonfiction has appeared in Aeon, Edge Effects, ISLE, and Resilience. She currently teaches Environmental Literature and writing at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She also keeps bees and loves being in a canoe.

 

The Scientists

Steven Carpenter

Steve Carpenter
steve.carpenter@wisc.edu
My limnological research focuses on the interaction of biogeochemistry and food web processes in lakes. I am especially interested in prediction of lake characteristics from land-water interactions and food web processes, including human effects such as fishing and introduction of exotic species.

Susan Knight Susan Knight
seknight@wisc.edu

My research interests include native and invasive aquatic plants (especially bladderworts) and bog vegetation and ecology.
Tim Katz

Tim Kratz
tkratz@nsf.gov
My research interests include the long-term, regional ecology of lakes; lake metabolism, including carbon dynamics in lakes, and the use of automated sensing systems to observe lake dynamics.

Noah Lottig

Noah Lottig
nrlottig@wisc.edu
My primary research interests focus around ecosystem ecology and biogeochemistry. I am particularly interested in understanding how suites of embedded aquatic ecosystems influence regional carbon dynamics.

John Magnuson

John Magnuson
john.magnuson@wisc.edu
My research activities focus on long-term ecological research on lake ecological systems, potential influence of climate change on inland waters, fish and fisheries ecology, biogeography and landscape ecology of lake and stream systems, and ecological dynamics of biodiversity and invasion.

Mike Meyers

Mike Meyer
Michael.Meyer@wisconsin.gov
I spent my youth growing up on lakes in Vilas County, and now have the privilege of conducting wildlife research for the DNR on these same lakes. Sometimes it pays to grow where you are planted, it has been a great career!

Emily Stanley

Emily Stanley
ehstanley@wisc.edu
My research focuses on ecosystem dynamics of rivers and streams. I am broadly interested in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycling in these environments, and how nutrients are affected by human activities (including restoration), and by linkages with other aquatic ecosystems. Much of my work is done at the interface between ecology, geomorphology, and hydrology.