US Long-Term Ecological Research Network

LTREB Lake Mývatn Midge Infall 2008-2011

Abstract
Adjacent ecosystems are influenced by organisms that move across boundaries, such as insects with aquatic larval stages and terrestrial adult stages that transport energy and nutrients from water to land. However, the ecosystem-level effect of aquatic insects on land has generally been ignored, perhaps because the organisms themselves are individually small. At the naturally productive Lake Mývatn, Iceland we measured relative midge density on land using passive aerial infall traps during the summers 2008-2011. These traps, a cup with a small amount of lethal preservative, were placed along transects perpendicular to the lake edge and extending ~150-500 m into the shoreline ecosystem and were sampled approximately weekly from May-August. The measurements of midge relative abundance over land were then used to develop a local maximum decay function model to predict proportional midge deposition with distance from the lake (Dreyer et al. <em>in press</em>). In general, peak midge deposition occurrs 20-25 m inland and 70% of midges are deposited within 100 m of shore.
Additional Information
<p>Portions of Abstract and methods edited excerpt from Dreyer et al. <em>in Press</em> which was derived, in part, from these data.</p>
Contact
Dataset ID
306
Date Range
-
Maintenance
On-going
Metadata Provider
Methods
I. Study System Lake Mývatn, Iceland (65&deg;36 N, 17&deg;0&prime; W) is a large (38 km<sup>2</sup>) shallow (4 m max depth) lake divided into two large basins that function mostly as independent hydrologic bodies (Ólafsson 1979). The number of non-biting midge (Diptera: Chironomidae) larvae on the lake bottom is high, but variable: midge production between 1972-74 ranged from 14-100 g ash-free dw m<sup>-2</sup> yr<sup>-1</sup>, averaging 28 g dw m<sup>-2</sup> yr<sup>-1</sup> (Lindegaard and Jónasson 1979). The midge assemblage is mostly comprised of two species (&gt; 90% of total individuals), Chironomus islandicus (Kieffer) and Tanytarsus gracilentus (Holmgren) that feed as larvae in the sediment in silken tubes by scraping diatoms, algae, and detritus off the lake bottom (Lindegaard and Jónasson 1979). At maturity (May-August) midge pupae float to the lake surface, emerge as adults, and fly to land, forming large mating swarms around the lake (Einarsson et al. 2004, Gratton et al. 2008). On land, midges are consumed by terrestrial predators (Dreyer et al. 2012, Gratton et al. 2008), or enter the detrital pool upon death (Gratton et al. 2008, Hoekman et al. 2012). Midge populations naturally cycle with 5-8 year periodicity, with abundances fluctuating by 3-4 orders of magnitude (Einarsson et al. 2002, Ives et al. 2008). II. Midge Infall Measurement We deployed eleven transects of passive, lethal aerial infall traps arrayed at variable distances from Lake Mývatn to estimate relative midge abundance on shore during the summers 2008-2011. Each transect was perpendicular to the lake edge, with traps located at approximately 5, 50, 150, and 500 m (where possible) from shore for a total of 31 traps around the lake. Sampling locations were recorded using GPS and precise distances from the lake were calculated within a geographic information system. Traps consisted of a single 1000 mL clear plastic cup (0.0095 m<sup>2</sup> opening) affixed 1 m above the ground on a stake and filled with 300-500 mL of a 1:1 mixture of water and ethylene glycol and a trace amount of unscented detergent to capture, kill, and preserve insects landing on the surface of the liquid (Gratton et al. 2008, Dreyer et al. 2012). Midges and other insects were emptied from the traps weekly and the traps were reset immediately, thus collections span the entirety of each summer. III. Identification, Counts, and Conversions Midges were counted and identified to morphospecies, small and large. The midge (Diptera,Chrionomidae) assemblage at Mývatn is dominated by two species, Chironomus islandicus (Kieffer)(large, 1.1 mg dw) and Tanytarsus gracilentus (Holmgren)(small, 0.1 mg dw), together comprising 90 percent of total midge abundance (Lindegaard and Jonasson 1979). First, the midges collected in the infall traps were spread out in trays, and counted if there were only a few. Some midges were only identified to the family level of Simuliidae, and other arthropods were counted and categorized as the group, others. Arthropods only identified to the family level Simuliidae or classified as others were not dually counted as Chironomus islandicus or Tanytarsus gracilentus . If there were many midges, generally if there were hundreds to thousands, in an infall trap, subsamples were taken. Subsampling was done using plastic rings that were dropped into the tray. The rings were relatively small compared to the tray, about 2 percent of the area of a tray was represented in a ring. The area inside a ring and the total area of the trays were also measured. Note that different sized rings and trays were used in subsample analysis. These are as follows, trays, small (area of 731 square centimeters), &ldquo;large1&rdquo; (area of 1862.40 square centimeters), and large2 (area of 1247 square centimeters). Rings, standard ring (diameter of 7.30 centimeters, subsample area is 41.85 square centimeters) and small ring (diameter of 6.5 centimeters, subsample area is 33.18 square centimeters). A small ring was only used to subsample trays classified as type &ldquo;large2.&rdquo;The fraction subsampled was then calculated depending on the size of the tray and ring used for the subsample analysis. If the entire tray was counted and no subsampling was done then the fraction subsampled was assigned a value of 1.0. If subsampling was done the fraction subsampled was calculated as the number of subsamples taken multiplied by the fraction of the tray that a subsample ring area covers (number of subsamples multiplied by (ring area divided by tray area)). Note that this is dependent on the tray and ring used for subsample analysis. Finally, the number of midges in an infall trap accounting for subsampling was calculated as the raw count of midges divided by the fraction subsampled (raw count divided by fraction subsampled).Other metrics such as total insects in meters squared per day, and total insect biomass in grams per meter squared day can be calculated with these data. In addition to the estimated average individual midge masses in grams, For 2008 through 2010 average midge masses were calculated as, Tanytarsus equal to .0001104 grams, Chironomus equal to .0010837 grams. For 2011 average midge masses were, Tanytarsus equal to .000182 grams, Chironomus equal to .001268 grams.
Version Number
13

LTREB Lake Mývatn Midge Emergence 2008-2011

Abstract
Adjacent ecosystems are influenced by organisms that move across boundaries, such as insects with aquatic larval stages and terrestrial adult stages that transport energy and nutrients from water to land. However, the ecosystem-level effect of aquatic insects on land has generally been ignored, perhaps because the organisms themselves are individually small. Between 2008-2011 at the naturally productive Lake Myvatn, Iceland we measured total insect emergence from water using emergence traps suspended in the water column. These traps were placed throughout the south basin of Lake Myvatn and were sampled every 1-3 weeks during the summer months (May-August). The goal of this sampling regime was to estimate total midge emergence from Lake Myvatn, with the ultimate goal of predicting, in conjunction with land-based measurements of midge density (see Lake Myvatn Midge Infall 2008-2011) the amount of midges that are deposited on the shoreline of the lake. Estimates from emergence traps between 2008-2011 indicated a range of 0.15 g dw m-2 yr-1 to 3.7 g dw m-2 yr-1, or a whole-lake emergence of 3.1 Mg dw yr-1 to 76 Mg dw yr-1.
Additional Information
<p>Portions of Abstract and methods edited excerpt from Dreyer et al. <em>in Press</em> which was derived, in part, from these data.</p>
Contact
Dataset ID
305
Date Range
-
Maintenance
Ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
I. Study System Lake Mývatn, Iceland (65&deg;36 N, 17&deg;0&prime; W) is a large (38 km<sup>2</sup>) shallow (4 m max depth) lake divided into two large basins that function mostly as independent hydrologic bodies (Ólafsson 1979). The number of non-biting midge (Diptera: Chironomidae) larvae on the lake bottom is high, but variable: midge production between 1972-74 ranged from 14-100 g ash-free dw m<sup>-2</sup> yr<sup>-1</sup>, averaging 28 g dw m<sup>-2</sup> yr<sup>-1</sup> (Lindegaard and Jónasson 1979). The midge assemblage is mostly comprised of two species (&gt; 90% of total individuals), Chironomus islandicus (Kieffer) and Tanytarsus gracilentus (Holmgren) that feed as larvae in the sediment in silken tubes by scraping diatoms, algae, and detritus off the lake bottom (Lindegaard and Jónasson 1979). At maturity (May-August) midge pupae float to the lake surface, emerge as adults, and fly to land, forming large mating swarms around the lake (Einarsson et al. 2004, Gratton et al. 2008). On land, midges are consumed by terrestrial predators (Dreyer et al. 2012, Gratton et al. 2008), or enter the detrital pool upon death (Gratton et al. 2008, Hoekman et al. 2012). Midge populations naturally cycle with 5-8 year periodicity, with abundances fluctuating by 3-4 orders of magnitude (Einarsson et al. 2002, Ives et al. 2008). II. Midge Emergence Measurement We used submerged conical traps to estimate midge emergence from Lake Mývatn. Traps were constructed of 2 mm clear polycarbonate plastic (Laird Plastics, Madison, WI) formed into a cone with large-diameter opening of 46 cm (0.17 m<sup>2</sup>). The tops of the cones were open to a diameter of 10 cm, with a clear jar affixed at the apex. The trap was weighted to approximately neutral buoyancy, with the jar at the top containing air to allow mature midges to emerge. Traps were suspended with a nylon line ~1 m below the surface of the lake from an anchored buoy. For sampling, traps were raised to the surface and rapidly inverted, preventing midges from escaping. Jars and traps were thoroughly rinsed with lake water to collect all trapped midges, including unmetamorphosed larvae and pupae, and scrubbed before being returned to the lake to prevent growth of epiphytic algae and colonization by midges. We assume that the emergence traps collect all potentially emerging midges from the sampling area, though it is likely an underestimate, since some midges initially captured could fall out of the trap. Thus, our results should be considered a conservative estimate of potential midge emergence from the surface of the lake.We sampled midge emergence throughout the south basin of Lake Mývatn. Emergence was sampled at six sites in 2008 and 2011 and ten sites in 2009 and 2010, with locations relocated using GPS and natural sightlines. Each site had two traps within 5 m of each other that were monitored during midge activity, approximately from the last week of May to the first week of August. Midge emergence outside of this time frame is extremely low (Lindegaard &amp; Jónasson 1979) and we assume it to be zero. Traps were checked weekly during periods of high emergence (initial and final 2-3 weeks of the study), and bi-weekly during low emergence periods in the middle of the study (July). III. Identification, Counts, and Conversions Midges were counted and identified to morphospecies, small and large. The midge (Diptera,Chrionomidae) assemblage at Mývatn is dominated by two species, Chironomus islandicus (Kieffer)(large, 1.1 mg dw) and Tanytarsus gracilentus (Holmgren)(small, 0.1 mg dw), together comprising 90 percent of total midge abundance (Lindegaard and Jonasson 1979). First, the midges collected in the infall traps were spread out in trays, and counted if there were only a few. Some midges were only identified to the family level of Simuliidae, and other arthropods were counted and categorized as the group, others. Arthropods only identified to the family level Simuliidae or classified as others were not dually counted as Chironomus islandicus or Tanytarsus gracilentus . If there were many midges, generally if there were hundreds to thousands, in an infall trap, subsamples were taken. Subsampling was done using plastic rings that were dropped into the tray. The rings were relatively small compared to the tray, about 2 percent of the area of a tray was represented in a ring. The area inside a ring and the total area of the trays were also measured. Note that different sized rings and trays were used in subsample analysis. These are as follows, trays, small (area of 731 square centimeters), &ldquo;large1&rdquo; (area of 1862.40 square centimeters), and large2 (area of 1247 square centimeters). Rings, standard ring (diameter of 7.30 centimeters, subsample area is 41.85 square centimeters) and small ring (diameter of 6.5 centimeters, subsample area is 33.18 square centimeters). A small ring was only used to subsample trays classified as type &ldquo;large2.&rdquo;The fraction subsampled was then calculated depending on the size of the tray and ring used for the subsample analysis. If the entire tray was counted and no subsampling was done then the fraction subsampled was assigned a value of 1.0. If subsampling was done the fraction subsampled was calculated as the number of subsamples taken multiplied by the fraction of the tray that a subsample ring area covers (number of subsamples multiplied by (ring area divided by tray area)). Note that this is dependent on the tray and ring used for subsample analysis. Finally, the number of midges in an infall trap accounting for subsampling was calculated as the raw count of midges divided by the fraction subsampled (raw count divided by fraction subsampled).Other metrics such as total insects in meters squared per day, and total insect biomass in grams per meter squared day can be calculated with these data. In addition to the estimated average individual midge masses in grams, For 2008 through 2010 average midge masses were calculated as, Tanytarsus equal to .0001104 grams, Chironomus equal to .0010837 grams. For 2011 average midge masses were, Tanytarsus equal to .000182 grams, Chironomus equal to .001268 grams.
Version Number
13

LTREB Kalfastrond Peninsula Experiment (KAL) Midge Counts at Lake Myvatn 2008-2011

Abstract
A cross ecosystem resource blocking experiment was conducted on the Kalfastrond peninsula, known as the KAL experiment or KAL midge blocking experiment, at Lake Myvatn to determine the influence of an aquatic resource on a terrestrial food web over time. A manipulative field experiment was used in conjunction with a stable isotope analysis to examine changes in terrestrial arthropod food webs in response to the midge subsidy. Cages were established at 2 by 2 meter plots in 6 blocks spread across the site. Each block included 3 treatment levels, an open control plot, a full exclusion cage and a partial exclusion cage, for a total of 18 experimental plots. Midge exclusion cages were designed to prevent midges from entering plots with such cages. Control open pit midge cages were set as a control which allowed complete access to all arthropods. Partial midge exclusion cages were designed and used to examine any effects of cages themselves on terrestrial responses while minimally affecting midge inputs into the plots and arthropod movement. All cages were set at the middle to end of May to the beginning of August in each year, the period corresponding to the active growing season of plants and the flight activity of midges at this site. Midge activity was measured in all plots to document changes in midge abundance over the course of a season and between years and to assess the degree to which cages excluded midges.Midge abundance in the plots was continuously measured using passive aerial infall traps. Midges from infall traps were counted and identified to morphospecies, where the small species is Tanytarsus gracilentus and the large species is Chironomus islandicus. Some arthropods were only identified to the family level Simuliidae, and other arthropods were lumped in a category named others. If the infall trap contained hundreds to thousands of a particular midge species a subsample for each species was performed to estimate the number of midges trapped. These data are the results of the midge counts from the infall traps.
Contact
Core Areas
Dataset ID
284
Date Range
-
Maintenance
Ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
I. Field MethodsThe site where this manipulative field experiment was conducted on the Kalfastrond peninsula at Lake Myvatn is approximately 150 meters long and 75 meters wide. The vegetation consists of grasses Deschampsia spp., Poa spp., and Agrostis spp.), sedges (Carex spp.), and forbs (Ranunculus acris, Geum rivale,and Potentilla palustris). The experimental midge exclusions occurred from the middle or end of May to the beginning of August in each year, the period corresponding to the active growing season of plants and the flight activity of midges at this site. 2 by 2 meter plots were established in 6 blocks spread across the site. Each block included 3 treatment levels, an open control plot, a full exclusion cage and a partial exclusion cage, for a total of 18 experimental plots. Control plots were open to allow complete access to all arthropods. Experimental midge exclusion cages were 1 meter high and constructed from white PVC tubing affixed to rebar posts on each corner of the plot, Plate 1. Full exclusion cages were entirely covered with white polyester netting, 200 holes per square inch, Barre Army Navy Store, Barre VT, USA, to prevent midges from entering the plot. The mesh netting completely enclosed the 2 by 2 by 1 meter frame to prevent flying insects from entering, however the mesh was not secured to the ground in order to allow non flying,ground crawling, arthropods to freely enter and exit the cages. Partial exclusion cages had one 0.5 meter strip of mesh stretched around the outside of the frame and another 0.75 meter strip draped over the top. Partial cages were designed to examine any effects of cages themselves on terrestrial responses while minimally affecting midge inputs into the plots and arthropod movement.The partial exclusion treatment was discontinued in 2011. Each plot contains a pitfall and an infall trap that are continuously sampled during the summer, while the cages are up. Vacuum samples were taken from the plots about once per month in 2008 through 2010 and only once per summer for subsequent summers.Midge activity was measured in all plots to document changes in midge abundance over the course of a season and between years and to assess the degree to which cages excluded midges. Midge abundance in the plots was continuously measured using passive aerial infall traps consisting of a 1000 milliliter clear plastic cup, 95 square centimeter opening, attached to a post 0.5 meters high and filled with 250 milliliters of a 1 to 1 ethylene glycol to water solution and a small amount of unscented detergent to capture and kill insects that alighted upon the surface. Infall traps were emptied about every 10 days.II. AnalysisMidges were counted and identified to morphospecies, small and large. The midge (Diptera,Chrionomidae) assemblage at Myvatn is dominated by two species,Chironomus islandicus (Kieffer)(large, 1.1 mg dw) and Tanytarsus gracilentus(Holmgren)(small, 0.1 mg dw), together comprising 90 percent of total midge abundance (Lindegaard and Jonasson 1979). First, the midges collected in the infall traps were spread out in trays, and counted if there were only a few. Some midges were only identified to the family level of Simuliidae,and other arthropods were counted and categorized as the group, others. Arthropods only identified to the family level Simuliidae or classified as others were not dually counted as Chironomus islandicus or Tanytarsus gracilentus. If there were many midges, generally if there were hundreds to thousands, in an infall trap,subsamples were taken. Subsampling was done using plastic rings that were dropped into the tray. The rings were relatively small compared to the tray, about 2 percent of the area of a tray was represented in a ring. The area inside a ring and the total area of the trays were also measured. Note that different sized rings and trays were used in subsample analysis. These are as follows, Trays, small (area of 731 square centimeters), large1 (area of 1862.40 square centimeters), and large2 (area of 1247 square centimeters). Rings, standard ring (diameter of 7.30 centimeters, subsample area is 41.85 square centimeters) and small ring (diameter of 6.5 centimeters, subsample area is 33.18 square centimeters). A small ring was only used to subsample trays classified as type large2.The fraction subsampled was then calculated depending on the size of the tray and ring used for the subsample analysis. If the entire tray was counted and no subsampling was done then the fraction subsampled was assigned a value of 1.0. If subsampling was done the fraction subsampled was calculated as the number of subsamples taken multiplied by the fraction of the tray that a subsample ring area covers (number of subsamples multiplied by (ring area divided by tray area)). Note that this is dependent on the tray and ring used for subsample analysis. Finally, the number of midges in an infall trap accounting for subsampling was calculated as the raw count of midges divided by the fraction subsampled (raw count divided by fraction subsampled).Other metrics such as total insects in meters squared per day, and total insect biomass in grams per meter squared day can be calculated with these data. in addition to the estimated average individual midge masses in grams, For 2008 through 2010 average midge masses were calculated as, Tanytarsus equal to .0001104 grams, Chironomus equal to .0010837 grams. For 2011 average midge masses were, Tanytarsus equal to .000182 grams, Chironomus equal to .001268 grams.
Version Number
15

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Pelagic Macroinvertebrate Summary 1983 - current

Abstract
This is a summary of dataset NTL 13. Derived data include the mean and standard deviation of the number of each species captured as well as the mean and standard deviation of the density of individuals on both an areal and volumetric basis.Five vertical tows are done at the deepest point of each of the seven primary lakes in the Trout Lake area (Allequash, Big Muskellunge, Crystal, Sparkling, and Trout lakes and bog lakes 27-02 [Crystal Bog], and 12-15 [Trout Bog]) using a 1-mm mesh net with a 1-m wide mouth. On Trout Lake four additional sites are sampled, where depths are approximately at 10 m, 15 m, 20 m, and 25 m respectively, with three tows done at each site. Trout Lake was the only lake sampled in 2020. All samples are taken in darkness. Samples are preserved and counted, yielding numbers caught. These night tows target the large invertebrate planktivore component of the pelagic zooplankton community. Sampling Frequency: annually Number of sites: 11
Core Areas
Dataset ID
14
Date Range
-
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
Number of individuals per square meter are calculated based on the opening of the net: 3.14159*0.25, and individuals per cubic meter are then devided by the meter depth where towing starts.Taxonomic groups counted: Chaoborus spp. (differentiating between larvae and pupae), Leptodora kinditi, Mysis relicta, and Bythotrephes longimanus.Sampling takes place at the deep hole in all lakes, in Trout Lakes 4 additional sites are sampled based on water depth not latitude/longitude along a transect from the deep hole to Rocky Reef point. Thus each lake has five samples collected, except Trout Lake, which has 17 total samples.
Short Name
NTLIP02
Version Number
31

North Temperate Lakes LTER Pelagic Macroinvertebrate Abundance 1983 - current

Abstract
Five vertical tows are done at the deepest point of each of the seven primary lakes in the Trout Lake area (Allequash, Big Muskellunge, Crystal, Sparkling, and Trout lakes and bog lakes 27-02 [Crystal Bog], and 12-15 [Trout Bog]) using a 1-mm mesh net with a 1-m wide mouth. On Trout Lake four additional sites are sampled, where depths are approximately at 10 m, 15 m, 20 m, and 25 m respectively, with three tows done at each site. Trout Lake was the only lake sampled in 2020. All samples are taken in darkness. Samples are preserved and counted, yielding numbers caught. These night tows target the large invertebrate planktivore component of the pelagic zooplankton community. Sampling Frequency: annually Number of sites: 11
Core Areas
Dataset ID
13
Date Range
-
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
We collect night vertical tows with a 1meter diameter, 1mm mesh net from each lake in late summer. Sampling stations are at the deep hole permanent anchor in each lake. Trout Lake has four additional sampling stations. Collect five replicate tows at the same depth from the deep hole of each lake. For Trout Lake, in addition to the five replicate tows from the deep hole, take three replicate tows from four sites with depths of 10m, 15m, 20m, and 25m along a transect from the deep hole to Rocky Reef point. Thus each lake will have five samples collected, except Trout Lake, which will have 17 total samples. Samples should be taken in late summer (late August to early September). Sample after dark. The time will vary throughout the sampling period, but always wait until all skylight from the sun has disappeared. This is to give Chaoborus, which performs diel vertical migrations, time to ascend into the water column. Tie up to floats at the sampling stations. To maximize the accuracy of population estimates, the boat should be prevented from drifting. Lower the net so that the ring is at the prescribed depth. This allows us to sample most of the water column, while keeping the net off the bottom. If the bucket hits the lake bottom, rinse out the net thoroughly three times with lake water and resample, adjusting the depth accordingly. If you must make this adjustment, be sure to record the actual depth and take all remaining samples from that same depth. Once the net has been lowered to depth, allow it to settle. Raise the net at a rate of 0.5 morsec for good sampling efficiency. Upon reaching the surface with the net, rinse it by dipping it three times into the lake without submerging the top of the net. This will rinse animals trapped on the mesh into the catch bucket without introducing new animals into the sample. Reduce the volume of water in the bucket by swirling it--this unclogs the mesh and allows the water to drain. Rinse the lower 25 cm of the net in the lake again to further rinse animals into the bucket (trapped zooplankton often accumulate at the lower end of the net). Reduce the volume of water in the bucket as much as possible by swirling again. Release the butterfly clamps and pour the contents into the appropriate sample jar. Rinse the bucket using the wash bottle, swirling as before to reduce the volume, and adding the rinse water to the sample. Record the sample time (24-hour clock) on the datasheet and place sample into the cooler. Rinse the net and bucket in the lake between tows. Upon returning to the lab, rinse the net and bucket in the sink and hang net over the sink to dry. Counting Samples should be counted with a binocular microscope at about 60x total magnification. Count the entire sample; do not subsample. For ease of counting, use a petrie dish with a grid or superimpose a grid on the counting dish (a metal grid with 1 cm squares works very nicely). Samples are counted for the total numbers of the following animals: Chaoborus spp. (differentiating between larvae and pupae), Leptodora kinditi, and Mysis relicta. In addition, make a note of the relative abundance of Holopedium and Daphnia within each sample--these animals do not have to be counted, as the 1 mm mesh is too big to give a quantitative sample. As a general guideline for Holopedium and Dapnia: "very few" » 10, "few" » 50, "moderate" » 100, "many" » 500, "very many" » 1000 or more.
Short Name
NTLIP01
Version Number
32
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