US Long-Term Ecological Research Network

North Temperate Lakes LTER: High Frequency Meteorological Data - Crystal Lake 2011 - 2014

Abstract
Data from the instrumented buoy on Crystal Lake include micrometeorological parameters, relative humidity, air temperature, wind velocity, wind driection (2 m height),and water temperatures, pH, chlorophyll, and dissolved oxygen measured by a sonde that is moving through the water column.
Contact
Dataset ID
302
Date Range
-
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
Data from the instrumented buoy on Crystal Lake include micrometeorological parameters, relative humidity, air temperature, wind velocity, wind direction (2 m height),and water temperatures, pH, chlorophyll, and dissolved oxygen measured by a sonde that is moving through the water column. Sampling Frequency: one minute;
Version Number
19

Eradication via destratification: whole-lake mixing to selectively remove rainbow smelt, a cold-water invasive species.

Abstract
Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) are an invasive species associated with several negative changes to lake ecosystems in northern Wisconsin. We combined empirically based bioenergetics models with empirically based hydrodynamic models to assess lake destratification as a potential rainbow smelt eradication method. The dataset reported here is the otolith data from 20 age 1plus individuals.
Dataset ID
266
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Metadata Provider
Methods
Rainbow smelt were sampled from Crystal Lake to obtain age and growth estimates. Samples were taken using vertical gillnets and beach seines during late July and early August of 2009. Annual growth was estimated using sectioned sagittal otoliths from 25 individuals spanning the observed length range (31–164 mm). Otoliths were mounted in epoxy and a transverse section was removed using a low-speed saw. Annual growth estimates were measured along a radius from the origin to the edge oriented perpendicular to annual growth rings. Age-specific length was estimated using the biological intercept method of back-calculation. The biological intercept was calculated by applying the average rainbow smelt otolith radius at time of hatch, to our observed linear relationship of natural-log-transformed total otolith radius and total fish length. Of the 25 individuals aged using otoliths, 5 were YOYs. As a result, annual growth was only back-calculated using the 20 older individuals. Weight at age was determined from back-calculated lengths using a weight–length relationship derived from 100 individuals captured during late July and early August of 2009.
Version Number
22

Little Rock Lake Experiment at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Zooplankton count 1983 - 2000

Abstract
The Little Rock Acidification Experiment was a joint project involving the USEPA (Duluth Lab), University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, University of Wisconsin-Superior, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Little Rock Lake is a bi-lobed lake in Vilas County, Wisconsin, USA. In 1983 the lake was divided in half by an impermeable curtain and from 1984-1989 the northern basin of the lake was acidified with sulfuric acid in three two-year stages. The target pHs for 1984-5, 1986-7, and 1988-9 were 5.7, 5.2, and 4.7, respectively. Starting in 1990 the lake was allowed to recover naturally with the curtain still in place. Data were collected through 2000. The main objective was to understand the population, community, and ecosystem responses to whole-lake acidification. Funding for this project was provided by the USEPA and NSF. Zooplankton samples are collected from the treatment and reference basins of Little Rock Lake at at two to nine depths using a 30L Schindler Patalas trap (53um mesh). Zooplankton samples are preserved in buffered formalin and archived. Data are summed over sex and stage and integrated volumetrically over the water column to provide a lake-wide estimate of organisms per liter for each species. Sampling Frequency: varies - Number of sites: 2
Core Areas
Dataset ID
251
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
We collect zooplankton samples at the deepest part of the lake using two different gear types. We take one vertical tow with a Wisconsin Net (80um mesh), and a series of Schindler Patalas (53um mesh) samples spanning the water column. All samples are preserved in cold 95percent EtOH. After collection we combine subsamples of the individual Schindler Patalas trap samples to create one hypsometrically pooled sample for each lakeordate. The individual depth samples are discarded after pooling except from one August sampling date per year. The Hypsometrically Pooled sample and the Wisconsin Net sample are archived in the UW Zoology museum. We count zooplankton in one or two subsamples, each representing 1.8L of lake water, of the hypsometrically pooled samples to calculate zooplankton abundance. We count one sample date per month from the open water season, and the February ice cover sample. We identify individuals to genus or species, take length measurements, and count eggs and embryos. Protocol log: 1981-May1984 -- a 0.5m high, 31L Schindler Patalas trap with 80um mesh net was used. Two Wisconsin Net tows were collected. Preservative was 12percent buffered formalin. June1984 -- changed to 53um mesh net on Schindler trap. July1986 -- began using the 2m high, 45L Schindler Patalas trap. Changed WI Net collection to take only one tow. 2001 -- changed zooplankton preservative from 12percent buffered formalin to 95percent EtOH. The number of sample dates per year counted varies with lake and year, from 5 datesoryear to 17 datesoryear. 1981-1983 -- pooled samples are of several types: Total Pooled (TP) were created using equal volume subsamples of the Schindler samples. Epi, Meta, Hypo pooled used equal volume subsamples from the Schindler samples collected from each of the thermal strata. Strata Pooled used equal volume subsamples from the Epi, Meta, Hypo pooled samples to create an entire lake sample. Hypsometrically Pooled (HP) is our standard, which uses subsample volumes weighted to represent the hypsometry of the lake.
Short Name
LRZOOP1
Version Number
3

Little Rock Lake Experiment at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Snow and Ice Depth 1984 - 2000

Abstract
The Little Rock Acidification Experiment was a joint project involving the USEPA (Duluth Lab), University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, University of Wisconsin-Superior, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Little Rock Lake is a bi-lobed lake in Vilas County, Wisconsin, USA. In 1983 the lake was divided in half by an impermeable curtain and from 1984-1989 the northern basin of the lake was acidified with sulfuric acid in three two-year stages. The target pHs for 1984-5, 1986-7, and 1988-9 were 5.7, 5.2, and 4.7, respectively. Starting in 1990 the lake was allowed to recover naturally with the curtain still in place. Data were collected through 2000. The main objective was to understand the population, community, and ecosystem responses to whole-lake acidification. Funding for this project was provided by the USEPA and NSF. Snow and ice depth are measured during the winter months on the reference and treatment basins of Little Rock Lake. Sampling Frequency: varies - Number of sites: 4
Dataset ID
249
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Snow and ice depth are measured during the winter months on the reference and treatment basins of Little Rock Lake.
Short Name
LRWINTER
Version Number
4

Little Rock Lake Experiment at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Secchi Disk Depth; Other Auxiliary Sample Data 1983 - 2000

Abstract
The Little Rock Acidification Experiment was a joint project involving the USEPA (Duluth Lab), University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, University of Wisconsin-Superior, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Little Rock Lake is a bi-lobed lake in Vilas County, Wisconsin, USA. In 1983 the lake was divided in half by an impermeable curtain and from 1984-1989 the northern basin of the lake was acidified with sulfuric acid in three two-year stages. The target pHs for 1984-5, 1986-7, and 1988-9 were 5.7, 5.2, and 4.7, respectively. Starting in 1990 the lake was allowed to recover naturally with the curtain still in place. Data were collected through 2000. The main objective was to understand the population, community, and ecosystem responses to whole-lake acidification. Funding for this project was provided by the USEPA and NSF. Secchi Disk data were collected from the treatment and reference basins of Little Rock Lake at one station in the deepest part of each basin. Auxiliary data associated with each sampling event include time of day, air temperature, wind direction and speed, wave height, and cloud cover at the time of sampling. Sampling Frequency: varies - Number of sites: 2
Dataset ID
250
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
The disk is circular, 20 cm in diameter, and has alternating black and white quadrants. It is lowered using a calibrated Kevlar rope to minimize stretching. Readings are made on the shaded side of the boat without the aid of a plexiglass viewer. The points at which the disk disappears while being lowered and reappears while being raised are averaged to determine Secchi depth.
NTL Keyword
Short Name
LRSECC1
Version Number
4

Little Rock Lake Experiment at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Physical Limnology 1983 - 2000

Abstract
The Little Rock Acidification Experiment was a joint project involving the USEPA (Duluth Lab), University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, University of Wisconsin-Superior, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Little Rock Lake is a bi-lobed lake in Vilas County, Wisconsin, USA. In 1983 the lake was divided in half by an impermeable curtain and from 1984-1989 the northern basin of the lake was acidified with sulfuric acid in three two-year stages. The target pHs for 1984-5, 1986-7, and 1988-9 were 5.7, 5.2, and 4.7, respectively. Starting in 1990 the lake was allowed to recover naturally with the curtain still in place. Data were collected through 2000. The main objective was to understand the population, community, and ecosystem responses to whole-lake acidification. Funding for this project was provided by the USEPA and NSF. Parameters characterizing the physical limnology of the treatment (north basin, stations 1 and 3) and reference basin (south basin, station 2 and 4) are usually measured at one station in the deepest part of each basin (stations 1 and 2) at 0.5 to 1-m depth intervals depending on the parameter. Parameters measured at depth include water temperature, vertical penetration of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll and phaeopigments. Additional derived parameters include fraction of surface PAR at each depth and percent oxygen saturation. Auxiliary data include time of day, air temperature, cloud cover, and wind speed and direction and secchi depth. Sampling Frequency: varies - Number of sites: 4
Core Areas
Dataset ID
248
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Reading Temperature and Dissolved Oxygen1. Before leaving to sample a lake, check to make sure that there are no air bubbles under the probe membrane of the YSI TemperatureorDissolved Oxygen meter. If there are air bubbles or if it has been several months since changing the membrane (or if the instrument does not calibrate well or the oxygen readings wander), change the membrane as explained in the manual. Note: We have always used the Standard membranes. If adding water to new membrane fluid bottle (KCl), make sure to add Milli-Q water and not the CFL distilled water.2. Be sure to always store the probe in 100percent humidity surrounded by a wet sponge or paper towel.3. Turn on the temperatureordissolved oxygen meter at least 30 minutes before using it. It is best to turn it on before leaving to sample a lake as it uses up batteries slowly.4. Calibrate the meter using the chart on the back of the instrument (adjusted to the Madison altitude - 97percent oxygen saturation). Leave the plastic cap on the probe (at 100percent humidity). The temperature should not be changing during the calibration. Zero the instrument. When the temperature equilibrates, adjust the oxygen to correspond to the chart. After calibrating the instrument, switch the knob to percent oxygen saturation to make sure it is close to 97percent.5. Take readings at 1 meter intervals making sure to gently jiggle the cord when taking the oxygen readings (to avoid oxygen depletion). Jiggling the cord is not necessary if using a cable with a stirrer. Take half meter readings in the metalimnion (when temperature andoror oxygen readings exhibit a greater change with depth). A change of temperature greater than 1degreeC warrants half-meter intervals.6. Record the bottom depth using the markings on the temp.oroxygen meter cord and take a temperature and dissolved oxygen reading with the probe lying on the lake bottom. Dont forget to jiggle the probe to remove any sediment.7. If any readings seem suspicious, check them again when bringing the probe back up to the surface. You can also double check the calibration after bringing the probe out of the water (and putting the cap back on). Light (PAR) extinction coefficient is calculated by linearly regressing ln (FRLIGHT (z)) on depth z where the intercept is not constrained. FRLIGHT(z) = LIGHT(z) or DECK(z) where LIGHT(z) is light measured at depth z and DECK(z) is light measured on deck (above water) at the same time.For open water light profiles, the surface light measurement (depth z = 0) is excluded from the regression.For winter light profiles taken beneath the ice, the first light data are taken at the bottom of the ice cover and are included in the regression. The depth of uppermost light value is equal to the depth of the ice adjusted by the water level in the sample hole, i.e., the depth below the surface of the water. The water level can be at, above or below the surface of the ice. If the water level was not recorded, it is assumed to be 0.0 and the calculated light extinction coefficient is flagged. If ice thickness was not recorded, a light extinction coefficient is not calculated.For light data collected prior to March, 2007, light values less than 3.0 (micromolesPerMeterSquaredPerSec) are excluded. For light data collected starting in March 2007, light values less than 1.0 (micromolesPerMeterSquaredPerSec) are excluded. Except for bog lakes before August 1989, a light extinction coefficient is not calculated if there are less than three FRLIGHT values to be regressed. For bog lakes before August 1989, a light extinction coefficient is calculated if there are least two FRLIGHT values to be regressed. In these cases, the light extinction coefficient is flagged as non-standard.FRLIGHT values should be monotonically decreasing with depth. For light profiles where this is not true, a light extinction coefficient is not calculated.For samples for which light data at depth are present, but the corresponding deck light are missing, a light extinction coefficient is calculated by regressing ln (LIGHT (z)) on depth z. Note that if actual deck light had remained constant during the recording of the light profile, the resulting light extinction coefficient is the same as from regressing ln(FRLIGHT(z)). In these cases, the light extinction coefficient is flagged as non-standard.
Short Name
LRPHYS1
Version Number
4

Little Rock Lake Experiment at North Temperate Lakes LTER: pH and Alkalinity 1983 - 2000

Abstract
The Little Rock Acidification Experiment was a joint project involving the USEPA (Duluth Lab), University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, University of Wisconsin-Superior, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Little Rock Lake is a bi-lobed lake in Vilas County, Wisconsin, USA. In 1983 the lake was divided in half by an impermeable curtain and from 1984-1989 the northern basin of the lake was acidified with sulfuric acid in three two-year stages. The target pHs for 1984-5, 1986-7, and 1988-9 were 5.7, 5.2, and 4.7, respectively. Starting in 1990 the lake was allowed to recover naturally with the curtain still in place. Data were collected through 2000. The main objective was to understand the population, community, and ecosystem responses to whole-lake acidification. Funding for this project was provided by the USEPA and NSF. pH and alkalinity of the treatment and reference basins of Little Rock Lake are measured at one station in the deepest part of each basin at the top and bottom of the epilimnion, mid-thermocline, and top, middle, and bottom of the hypolimnion. During the course of the study, three different types of electrodes were used to measure pH. Sampling Frequency: varies - Number of sites: 2
Core Areas
Dataset ID
252
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
AlkalinitySamples for alkalinity are collected with a peristaltic pump and tubing into new, 20 ml HDPE plastic containers with conical caps. The samples are stored refrigerated at 4 degrees Celsius until analysis, which should occur within 2 weeks. The samples are warmed to room temperature and then analyzed with an Orion 720A pH meter and Radiometer combination electrode. The sample is titrated to an endpoint pH of approximately 3.557 by adding 0.05N HCl to 16 mls sample at the Hasler Lab (or 0.01N HCl to 4 mls sample at Trout Lake Station Lab) in 10 microliter increments using a micro-pipette. The pH meter millivolt readings (along with the corresponding the amount of acid added) of the last 10 acid additions prior to the endpoint are recorded.The detection limit for the gran alkalinity titration is approximately 5 micro-equivalents per liter of CO3 and the analytical range for the method extends to 4000 micro-equivalents per liter of CO3.Method Log: Prior to 1986 and since 2002, alkalinity titrations were performed as described above. During the period of February 1986 – November 2001, the alkalinity determinations for Trout, Sparkling, Allequash and Big Muskellunge Lakes were made by a Brinkmann 636 Titroprocessor using 0.05N HCl with 16 mls of sample.pHWe sample at the deepest part of the lake using a peristaltic pump and tubing, monthly during open water and approximately every five weeks during ice cover. We collect two types of pH samples at each sampling depth: one in 20ml vials with cone cap inserts to exclude all air from the vial, and one in 125ml bottles to be air equilibrated before analysis. The depths for sample collection are based on thermal stratification: top and bottom of the epilimnion, mid thermocline, and top, middle,and bottom of the hypolimnion. During mixis we sample at the surface, mid water column, and bottom.We analyze for pH the same day that samples are collected, keeping them cold and dark until just before analysis. Samples are warmed to room temperature in a dark container, and the air equilibrated samples are bubbled with outside air for at least 15 minutes prior to measurement. We measure pH using a Radiometer combination pH electrode and Orion 4Star pH meter.Protocol Log: 1981-1988 -- used a PHM84 Research pH meter.1986 -- began analyzing air equilibrated pH.1988 - July 2010 -- used an Orion model 720 pH meter.
Short Name
LRPHALK
Version Number
3

Little Rock Lake Experiment at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Nutrients 1996 - 2000

Abstract
The Little Rock Acidification Experiment was a joint project involving the USEPA (Duluth Lab), University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, University of Wisconsin-Superior, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Little Rock Lake is a bi-lobed lake in Vilas County, Wisconsin, USA. In 1983 the lake was divided in half by an impermeable curtain and from 1984-1989 the northern basin of the lake was acidified with sulfuric acid in three two-year stages. The target pHs for 1984-5, 1986-7, and 1988-9 were 5.7, 5.2, and 4.7, respectively. Starting in 1990 the lake was allowed to recover naturally with the curtain still in place. Data were collected through 2000. The main objective was to understand the population, community, and ecosystem responses to whole-lake acidification. Funding for this project was provided by the USEPA and NSF. Parameters characterizing the nutrient chemistry of the treatment and reference basins of Little Rock Lake are measured at one station in the deepest part of each basin at the top and bottom of the epilimnion, mid-thermocline, and top, middle, and bottom of the hypolimnion. These parameters include total nitrogen, total dissolved nitrogen, nitrate, ammonia, total phosphorus, total dissolved phosphorus, dissolved reactive phosphorus, bicarbonite-reactive filtered and unfiltered silica, dissolved reactive silica, total inorganic carbon, dissolved inorganic carbon, total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and total particulate matter. Sampling Frequency: varies - Number of sites: 2
Dataset ID
246
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Inorganic and organic carbonSamples for inorganic and organic carbon are collected together with a peristaltic pump and tubing and in-line filtered, if necessary, (through a 0.40 micron polycarbonate filter) into glass, 24 ml vials (that are compatible with the carbon analyzer autosampler), and capped with septa, leaving no head space. The samples are stored refrigerated at 4 degrees Celsius until analysis, which should occur within 2-3 weeks.The detection limit for inorganic carbon is 0.15 ppm, and the analytical range for the method is 60 ppm.The detection limit for organic carbon is 0.30 ppm and the analytical range for the method is 30 ppm.Method Log: Prior to May 2006 samples, inorganic carbon was analyzed by phosphoric acid addition on an OI Model 700 Carbon Analyzer. From May 2006 to present, inorganic carbon is still analyzed by phosphoric acid addition, but on a Shimadzu TOC-V-csh Total Organic Carbon Analyzer.Method Log: Prior to May 2006 samples, organic carbon was analyzed by heated persulfate digestion on an OI Model 700 Carbon Analyzer. From May 2006 to present, Organic carbon is analyzed by combustion, on a Shimadzu TOC-V-csh Total Organic Carbon Analyzer.Dissolved reactive siliconSamples for silicon are collected with a peristaltic pump and tubing and in-line filtered (through a 40 micron polycarbonate filter) into 120 ml LDPE bottles and acidified to a 1percent HCl matrix by adding 1 ml of ultra pure concentrated HCl to 100 mls of sample. For every sample acidification event, three acid blanks are created by adding the same acid used on the samples to 100 mls of ultra pure water supplied from the lab. Once acidified, the samples are stable at room temperature until analysis, which should occur within one year. Until acidification, the samples should be refrigerated at 4 degrees Celsius.Dissolved reactive silica is determined by the Heteropoly Blue Method and the absorption is measured at 820 nm.The detection limit for silicon is 6 ppb and the analytical range is 15000 ppb.Method Log These determinations were performed manually using a Bausch and Lomb Spectrophotometer from the beginning of the project until April 1984. From 1984 through 2005, dissolved reactive silicon was determined on a Technicon Auto Analyzer II. From January 2006 to present, samples are run on an Astoria-Pacific Astoria II Autoanalyzer.total and dissolved nitrogen and phosphorusSamples for total and dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus analysis are collected together with a peristaltic pump and tubing and in-line filtered, when necessary, (through a 40 micron polycarbonate filter) into 120 ml LDPE bottles and acidified to a 1percent HCl matrix by adding 1 mL of ultra pure concentrated HCl to 100 mls of sample. For every sample acidification event, three acid blanks are created by adding the same acid used on the samples to 100 mls of ultra pure water supplied from the lab. Once acidified, the samples are stable at room temperature until analysis, which should occur within one year. Until acidification, the samples should be refrigerated at 4 degrees Celsius.The samples must first be prepared for analysis by adding an NaOH–Persulfate digestion reagent and heated for an hour at 120 degrees C and 18-20 psi in an autoclave.The samples are analyzed for total nitrogen and total phosphorus simultaneously by automated colorimetric spectrophotometry, using a segmented flow autoanalyzer. Total nitrogen is determined by utilizing the automated cadmium reduction method, as described in Standard Methods, where the absorption is monitored at 520 nm.The detection limit for total and dissolved nitrogen is approximately 21 ppb and the analytical range for the method extends to 2500 ppb.The detection limit for total phosphorus is approximately 3 ppb and the analytical range for the method extends to 800 ppb.Method Log: Prior to January 2006 samples, total nitrogen was determined on a Technicon segmented flow autoanalyzer. From 2006 to present, total nitrogen is determined by an Astoria-Pacific Astoria II segmented flow autoanalyzer.
Short Name
LRNUTR1
Version Number
4

Little Rock Lake Experiment at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Major Ions 1996 - 2000

Abstract
The Little Rock Acidification Experiment was a joint project involving the USEPA (Duluth Lab), University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, University of Wisconsin-Superior, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Little Rock Lake is a bi-lobed lake in Vilas County, Wisconsin, USA. In 1983 the lake was divided in half by an impermeable curtain and from 1984-1989 the northern basin of the lake was acidified with sulfuric acid in three two-year stages. The target pHs for 1984-5, 1986-7, and 1988-9 were 5.7, 5.2, and 4.7, respectively. Starting in 1990 the lake was allowed to recover naturally with the curtain still in place. Data were collected through 2000. The main objective was to understand the population, community, and ecosystem responses to whole-lake acidification. Funding for this project was provided by the USEPA and NSF. Parameters characterizing the major ions of the treatment and reference basins of Little Rock Lake are measured at one station in the deepest part of each basin at the top and bottom of the epilimnion, mid-thermocline, and top, middle, and bottom of the hypolimnion. These parameters include chloride, sulfate, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, iron, and manganese Sampling Frequency: varies - Number of sites: 2
Core Areas
Dataset ID
247
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Chloride, SulfateSamples for chloride and sulfate are collected together with a peristaltic pump and tubing and in-line filtered (through a 0.40 micron polycarbonate filter) into new, 20 ml HDPE plastic containers with conical caps. The samples are stored refrigerated at 4 degrees Celsius until analysis, which should occur within 6 months. The samples are analyzed for chloride (and sulfate) simultaneously by Ion Chromatography, using a hydroxide eluent.The detection limit for chloride is approximately 0.01 ppm and the analytical range for the method extends to 100 ppm.The detection limit for sulfate is approximately 0.01 ppm and the analytical range for the method extends to 60 ppm.Method Log: Prior to January 1998 samples, chloride was determined on a Dionex DX10 Ion Chromatograph, using a chemical fiber suppressor. From 1998 to 2011, chloride was determined by a Dionex model DX500, using an electro-chemical suppressor. From January 2011 until present, chloride is determined by a Dionex model ICS 2100 using an electro-chemical suppressor.
Short Name
LRMAJION1
Version Number
4

Little Rock Lake - CWH Study at North Temperate Lakes LTER - Benthic Macroinvertebrates 2002 - 2004

Abstract
Benthic invertebrates were collected as part of CWH (coarse woody habitat) study on Little Rock Lake in Vilas county, WI. Pre-manipulation sampling of the macroinvertebrate communities was conducted in the summer of 2002 before the CWH reduction and six times after the reduction, in early, mid, and late summer (May-August) of 2003 and 2004. We divided the shoreline of Little Rock Lake into 50 m sections and randomly chose five sections from each basin for each separate sampling of macroinvertebrates. We collected two benthos and two CWH macroinvertebrate samples at each section. We constructed a benthos sampler by connecting a SCUBA tank to a 7.6 cm PVC pipe with a hose attached 10 cm from one end of the pipe (Wahle and Steneck 1991; Roth et al. 2007). A 500 m Nitex mesh bag was place at the top end of the pipe furthest from the attached hose. Once the tank was turned on, a vacuum formed that sucked the benthos sample into the bag. We used a 0.09 m2 hoop to delineate the benthos sampling area. We sampled CWH using a self-contained, battery-powered aquatic vacuum with a 500 m Nitex mesh bag (Vander Zanden et al. 2006). Sampling lasted for 30 seconds. All samples were stored in 95% ethanol until processed. Macroinvertebrates were identified to the lowest possible taxonomic level. Helmus M.R. and Sass G.G. (2008) The rapid effects of a whole-lake reduction of coarse woody debris on fish and benthic macroinvertebrates. Freshwater Biology, 53, 1423-1433 Number of sites: 44 Sampling Frequency: once pre-manipulation, 6 sampling regimes after reduction
Core Areas
Dataset ID
230
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Benthic invertebrates were collected as part of CWH (coarse woody habitat) study on Little Rock Lake in Vilas county, WI. Pre-manipulation sampling of the macroinvertebrate communities was conducted in the summer of 2002 before the CWH reduction and six times after the reduction, in early, mid, and late summer (May-August) of 2003 and 2004. We divided the shoreline of Little Rock Lake into 50 m sections and randomly chose five sections from each basin for each separate sampling of macroinvertebrates. We collected two benthos and two CWH macroinvertebrate samples at each section. We constructed a benthos sampler by connecting a SCUBA tank to a 7.6 cm PVC pipe with a hose attached 10 cm from one end of the pipe (Wahle and Steneck 1991; Roth et al. 2007). A 500 m Nitex mesh bag was place at the top end of the pipe furthest from the attached hose. Once the tank was turned on, a vacuum formed that sucked the benthos sample into the bag. We used a 0.09 m2 hoop to delineate the benthos sampling area. We sampled CWH using a self-contained, battery-powered aquatic vacuum with a 500 m Nitex mesh bag (Vander Zanden et al. 2006). Sampling lasted for 30 seconds. All samples were stored in 95% ethanol until processed. Macroinvertebrates were identified to the lowest possible taxonomic level. Helmus M.R. and Sass G.G. (2008) The rapid effects of a whole-lake reduction of coarse woody debris on fish and benthic macroinvertebrates. Freshwater Biology, 53, 1423-1433 Number of sites: 44 Sampling Frequency: once pre-manipulation, 6 sampling regimes after reduction
Short Name
HELMUS1
Version Number
25
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