US Long-Term Ecological Research Network

LTREB Lake Mývatn Midge Infall 2008-2011

Abstract
Adjacent ecosystems are influenced by organisms that move across boundaries, such as insects with aquatic larval stages and terrestrial adult stages that transport energy and nutrients from water to land. However, the ecosystem-level effect of aquatic insects on land has generally been ignored, perhaps because the organisms themselves are individually small. At the naturally productive Lake Mývatn, Iceland we measured relative midge density on land using passive aerial infall traps during the summers 2008-2011. These traps, a cup with a small amount of lethal preservative, were placed along transects perpendicular to the lake edge and extending ~150-500 m into the shoreline ecosystem and were sampled approximately weekly from May-August. The measurements of midge relative abundance over land were then used to develop a local maximum decay function model to predict proportional midge deposition with distance from the lake (Dreyer et al. <em>in press</em>). In general, peak midge deposition occurrs 20-25 m inland and 70% of midges are deposited within 100 m of shore.
Additional Information
<p>Portions of Abstract and methods edited excerpt from Dreyer et al. <em>in Press</em> which was derived, in part, from these data.</p>
Contact
Dataset ID
306
Date Range
-
Maintenance
On-going
Metadata Provider
Methods
I. Study System Lake Mývatn, Iceland (65&deg;36 N, 17&deg;0&prime; W) is a large (38 km<sup>2</sup>) shallow (4 m max depth) lake divided into two large basins that function mostly as independent hydrologic bodies (Ólafsson 1979). The number of non-biting midge (Diptera: Chironomidae) larvae on the lake bottom is high, but variable: midge production between 1972-74 ranged from 14-100 g ash-free dw m<sup>-2</sup> yr<sup>-1</sup>, averaging 28 g dw m<sup>-2</sup> yr<sup>-1</sup> (Lindegaard and Jónasson 1979). The midge assemblage is mostly comprised of two species (&gt; 90% of total individuals), Chironomus islandicus (Kieffer) and Tanytarsus gracilentus (Holmgren) that feed as larvae in the sediment in silken tubes by scraping diatoms, algae, and detritus off the lake bottom (Lindegaard and Jónasson 1979). At maturity (May-August) midge pupae float to the lake surface, emerge as adults, and fly to land, forming large mating swarms around the lake (Einarsson et al. 2004, Gratton et al. 2008). On land, midges are consumed by terrestrial predators (Dreyer et al. 2012, Gratton et al. 2008), or enter the detrital pool upon death (Gratton et al. 2008, Hoekman et al. 2012). Midge populations naturally cycle with 5-8 year periodicity, with abundances fluctuating by 3-4 orders of magnitude (Einarsson et al. 2002, Ives et al. 2008). II. Midge Infall Measurement We deployed eleven transects of passive, lethal aerial infall traps arrayed at variable distances from Lake Mývatn to estimate relative midge abundance on shore during the summers 2008-2011. Each transect was perpendicular to the lake edge, with traps located at approximately 5, 50, 150, and 500 m (where possible) from shore for a total of 31 traps around the lake. Sampling locations were recorded using GPS and precise distances from the lake were calculated within a geographic information system. Traps consisted of a single 1000 mL clear plastic cup (0.0095 m<sup>2</sup> opening) affixed 1 m above the ground on a stake and filled with 300-500 mL of a 1:1 mixture of water and ethylene glycol and a trace amount of unscented detergent to capture, kill, and preserve insects landing on the surface of the liquid (Gratton et al. 2008, Dreyer et al. 2012). Midges and other insects were emptied from the traps weekly and the traps were reset immediately, thus collections span the entirety of each summer. III. Identification, Counts, and Conversions Midges were counted and identified to morphospecies, small and large. The midge (Diptera,Chrionomidae) assemblage at Mývatn is dominated by two species, Chironomus islandicus (Kieffer)(large, 1.1 mg dw) and Tanytarsus gracilentus (Holmgren)(small, 0.1 mg dw), together comprising 90 percent of total midge abundance (Lindegaard and Jonasson 1979). First, the midges collected in the infall traps were spread out in trays, and counted if there were only a few. Some midges were only identified to the family level of Simuliidae, and other arthropods were counted and categorized as the group, others. Arthropods only identified to the family level Simuliidae or classified as others were not dually counted as Chironomus islandicus or Tanytarsus gracilentus . If there were many midges, generally if there were hundreds to thousands, in an infall trap, subsamples were taken. Subsampling was done using plastic rings that were dropped into the tray. The rings were relatively small compared to the tray, about 2 percent of the area of a tray was represented in a ring. The area inside a ring and the total area of the trays were also measured. Note that different sized rings and trays were used in subsample analysis. These are as follows, trays, small (area of 731 square centimeters), &ldquo;large1&rdquo; (area of 1862.40 square centimeters), and large2 (area of 1247 square centimeters). Rings, standard ring (diameter of 7.30 centimeters, subsample area is 41.85 square centimeters) and small ring (diameter of 6.5 centimeters, subsample area is 33.18 square centimeters). A small ring was only used to subsample trays classified as type &ldquo;large2.&rdquo;The fraction subsampled was then calculated depending on the size of the tray and ring used for the subsample analysis. If the entire tray was counted and no subsampling was done then the fraction subsampled was assigned a value of 1.0. If subsampling was done the fraction subsampled was calculated as the number of subsamples taken multiplied by the fraction of the tray that a subsample ring area covers (number of subsamples multiplied by (ring area divided by tray area)). Note that this is dependent on the tray and ring used for subsample analysis. Finally, the number of midges in an infall trap accounting for subsampling was calculated as the raw count of midges divided by the fraction subsampled (raw count divided by fraction subsampled).Other metrics such as total insects in meters squared per day, and total insect biomass in grams per meter squared day can be calculated with these data. In addition to the estimated average individual midge masses in grams, For 2008 through 2010 average midge masses were calculated as, Tanytarsus equal to .0001104 grams, Chironomus equal to .0010837 grams. For 2011 average midge masses were, Tanytarsus equal to .000182 grams, Chironomus equal to .001268 grams.
Version Number
13

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Fish Abundance 1981 - current

Abstract
This data set is a derived data set based on fish catch data. Data are collected annually to enable us to track the fish assemblages of eleven primary lakes (Allequash, Big Muskellunge, Crystal, Sparkling, Trout, bog lakes 27-02 [Crystal Bog] and 12-15 [Trout Bog], Mendota, Monona, Wingra and Fish). Sampling on Lakes Monona, Wingra, and Fish started in 1995; sampling on other lakes started in 1981. Sampling is done at six littoral zone sites per lake with seine, minnow or crayfish traps, and fyke nets; a boat-mounted electrofishing system samples three littoral transects. Vertically hung gill nets are used to obtain two pelagic samples per lake from the deepest point. A trammel net samples across the thermocline at two sites per lake. In the bog lakes only fyke nets and minnow traps are deployed. Parameters measured include species-level identification and lengths for all fish caught, and weight and scale samples from a subset. Derived data sets include species richness, catch per unit effort, and size distribution by species, lake, and year. Protocol used to generate data: Day seines were only used in 1981 and have been eliminated from this data set to make sampling effort across years comparable. Number caught for each species is summed over repetitions of a gear within a lake and over depth. For information on fish stocking by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources in LTER lakes in Dane and Vilas counties, see https://dnr.wi.gov/fisheriesmanagement/Public/Summary/Index The only sampling done in 2020 were a single gill-netting replicate in Sparkling, Crystal, and Trout lakes. Sampling in Fish Lake was suspended in 2021 due to significant lake level changes. Sampling Frequency: annually. Number of sites: 11
Core Areas
Dataset ID
7
Date Range
-
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
The same sampling sites are used each year. All sampling occurs between the 3rd week of July and Labor Day. Sampling sites were chosen by random process in 1981 for the Northern lakes (Trout, Allequash, Sparkling, Crystal, and Big Muskellunge). Sites for Lake Mendota were chosen in 1981, and for the other Madison lakes (Monona, Fish, and Wingra) in 1995. All sites are identified with GPS coordinates, except on the bog lakes (Trout Bog and Crystal Bog) where nets are placed equal distances apart around the entire circumference of the lake in approximately the same locations each year.

Night seining is conducted on 6 seine sites per lake, each consisting of 100 meters of shoreline. Prior to 1997 this was subdivided into 3 seine hauls, each covering 33 meters. In 1997, seine hauls were reduced to 2 hauls of 33m each. The final section of the site is used as an alternate seine site in the event of difficulty in one of the first two hauls.
The seine used is 12.2 m long by 1.2 m deep, consisting of two 5.5 x 1.2 m wings surrounding a 1.2 x 1.2 x 1.2 m central bag. The wings are made of 6.4 mm stretch measure knitted delta-strength nylon mesh, and the bag is of 3.2 mm delta strength nylon mesh. The entire net is tarred. The two wings and the opening to the bag have weighted foot ropes and buoyed head ropes. An 8m length of rope is tied between the seine poles as a guide for the maximum spread of the seine.

A trammel net is set at two sites in each lake, and fished for approximately 24 hours at each site. The net is set on the bottom, along a line perpendicular to the shoreline and crossing the thermocline, with the shallow end at about 3m depth,. The trammel net used is 30.5 m long and 1.1 m deep. It consists of two outer nets of 170 mm square 32 kg test mesh multifilament nylon with an inner panel of 51 mm stretch mesh 9 kg test multifilament nylon. The three nets are connected at the leaded foot line and the buoyed head rope.

Fyke nets are deployed at six littoral sampling sites in each lake, and fished for approximately 24 hours. In Crystal Bog and Trout Bog lakes the fyke nets are suspended by placing floats on the hoops and frames to prevent the nets from sinking into the sediments. For the northern lakes, each fyke net is approximately 12 m long and consists of two rectangular steel frames 90 cm wide by 75 cm high and 4 steel hoops, all covered by 7 mm delta stretch mesh nylon netting. An 8 m long by 1.25 m deep leader net made of 7 mm delta stretch mesh nylon netting is attached to a center bar of the first rectangular frame (net mouth). The second rectangular frame has two 10 cm wide by 70 cm high openings, one on each side of the frame center bar. The four hoops follow the second frame. Throats 10 cm in diameter are located between the second and third hoops. The net ends in a bag with a 20.4 cm opening at the end, which is tied shut while the net is fishing. New nets of the same dimensions were purchased for the Northern Highland lakes in 2000. Fyke nets for the Madison lakes are 10 m long (including lead) with 1 rectangular aluminum frame followed by 2 aluminum hoops. The aluminum frame is 98 cm wide x 82 cm tall, and is constructed of 2.5 cm tubing, with an additional center vertical bar. The hoops are 60 cm in diameter and constructed of 5 mm diameter aluminum rod. The single net funnel is between the first and second hoops and is 20 cm in diameter. The lead is 8 m long and 1.25m deep, constructed from 7mm delta stretch mesh.

Crayfish traps are set on all lakes except the bog lakes (Crystal Bog and Trout Bog). Minnow traps are set only on the bog lakes. Prior to 1998, five traps were set at each fyke net site. Beginning 1998, three traps are set per site. Minnow traps and crayfish traps are set in shallow water (approx 1 m), 2 traps on one side, and 1 trap on the other side of the fyke net lead. Minnow traps are baited with 1 slice of bread, and crayfish traps with 120 g of beef liver. Traps are fished for approximately 24 hours. Crayfish are identified to species. Minnows caught in either crayfish or minnow traps are identified to species, and measured for total length. Minnow traps are galvanized steel two piece traps, 44.5 cm long by 30.5 cm maximum diameter with 2.5 cm diameter openings at the ends. The mesh size is 6.4 mm on a side. Crayfish traps are identical, but the opening hole of both sides of the trap has been forced to 5 to 7 cm. Crayfish sampling was terminated for the southern lakes in 2004 after it was determined that the catch per unit effort was too low (2 crayfish caught in 500+ traps)

Gill nets are set at the deepest point of all LTER lakes except Crystal Bog, Trout Bog, and Fish Lake. The nets are set for two consecutive 24 hour sets. The gill nets are a set of 7 nets, each in a different mesh size, hung vertically on foam rollers from the surface to the bottom of the lake, and chained together in a line. Each net is 4 m wide and 33 m long. From 1981 through 1990 the nets were multifilament mesh, in stretched mesh sizes of 19, 25, 32, 38, 51, 64, and 89 mm. In 1991, the multifilament nets were replaced with monofilament nets of the same sizes. Stretcher bars are installed at 10 meter intervals from the bottom to keep the net as rectangular as possible when deployed.

A boom style electrofishing system is used to sample the littoral zone fish community. Prior to 1997, four electrofishing transects were done on each lake. In 1997, the number of transects was reduced to 3. The same transects are used each year. Each transect consists of 30 minutes of current output, with the boat moving parallel to shore in 1-2 meters of water at a slow steady speed. We use the DC pulse system, with 240 volts at 3-5 amps. Transect lengths vary depending upon the size of the lake. If the end of a transect is reached before 30 minutes has elapsed, time is paused while the electrofisher loops back to the start of the transect. The transect is then repeated for the remaining time.

For all collecting methods, the fish are processed as follows. Each individual fish is identified to species. The total length of the fish is measured in mm, from nose to pinched tail. Prior to 1997, the weight of the first five fish of each species in each 10 mm size category was also measured, using Pesola spring balances. Starting in 1997, two fish are weighed for each species in each 5mm size category. A scale sample is collected from each yellow perch, rock bass, and cisco that is weighed. For gill net catches, the depth at which each individual is caught is also recorded.

Protocol Log. 1983: Discontinued fyke nets and trammel nets on Lake Mendota until 1995. 1984: Discontinued crayfish on Lake Mendota until 1995. Only gillnet and seines on Lake Mendota.1995: Resumed sampling Lake Mendota with the full suite of sampling gear. 1995: Began sampling Lakes Wingra, Monona, and Fish. 1997: Two fish are weighed for each fish species in each 5mm size category. Previously, five fish were weighed for each fish species in each 10mm size category. 1997: Data recording switched from manual field sheets to an electronic system. 1997: Changed from 4 to 3 electrofishing runs per lake. 1997: Changed from 18 to 12 seine hauls per lake. 1998: Changed from 30 to 18 crayfish or minnow traps per lake. 2004: Discontinued crayfish or minnow traps on southern lakes. 2020: Fish sampling very limited due to pandemic. 2021 discontinued all night seining.

DATA MODIFICATIONS
Prior to 2018, gill net data had been standardized to a 24-hour sampling period. This is no longer the case, and catch numbers for all years have been recomputed to reflect the number of fish actually caught.
2018-01-18: Species names ('spname') added in 2012 had space characters appended to the end of the name. These spaces have been removed. The occasional appearance throughout the data set of species name 'SUNFISH' and 'LARVALSUNFISH' have all been changed to 'UNIDSUNFISH'.
Short Name
NTLFI02
Version Number
41

Biocomplexity at North Temperate Lakes LTER; Coordinated Field Studies: Fish / Crayfish Abundance 2001 - 2004

Abstract
Abundance data for fish and crayfish collected for Biocomplexity Project; Landscape Context - Coordinated Field Studies http://infotrek.er.usgs.gov/doc/wdnr_biology/Public_Stocking/StateMapHotspotsAllYears.htm - Infomation on fish stocking by Wisconsin Department of Natural Resouces in Biocomplexity Lakes. Sampling Frequency: annually Number of sites: 58
Core Areas
Dataset ID
84
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Littoral Zone Surveys: Littoral habitat, fish and macrophyte surveys were performed at eight sites within each of the 55 lakes. The sites were chosen by randomly selecting two points per compass quadrant of each lake. Each year littoral habitat surveys were conducted in June, fish surveys in July and macrophyte surveys in August.Littoral fish were sampled in July of each year, along the shallow areas (water depth greater than 0 and less than2 m) adjacent to the riparian plots. Night electroshocking and crayfish and minnow traps were used to catch fish and crayfish. All species were identified and counted.
Short Name
BIOFISH2
Version Number
8
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