US Long-Term Ecological Research Network

Cascade Project at North Temperate Lakes LTER Core Data Physical and Chemical Limnology 1984 - 2016

Abstract
Physical and chemical variables are measured at one central station near the deepest point of each lake. In most cases these measurements are made in the morning (0800 to 0900). Vertical profiles are taken at varied depth intervals. Chemical measurements are sometimes made in a pooled mixed layer sample (PML); sometimes in the epilimnion, metalimnion, and hypolimnion; and sometimes in vertical profiles. In the latter case, depths for sampling usually correspond to the surface plus depths of 50percent, 25percent, 10percent, 5percent and 1percent of surface irradiance.
Dataset ID
352
Date Range
-
Methods
Methods for 1984-1990 were described by Carpenter and Kitchell (1993) and methods for 1991-1997 were described by Carpenter et al. (2001).
Version Number
14

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Light Extinction - Trout Lake Area 1981 - current

Abstract
A light (PAR) extinction coefficient is calculated for the water column for the seven northern study lakes (Allequash, Big Muskellunge, Crystal, Sparkling, and Trout lakes, unnamed lakes 27-02 [Crystal Bog] and 12-15 [Trout Bog]). The fraction of surface light is computed at 0.25-m to 1-m depth intervals depending on the lake. The light (PAR) extinction coefficient is calculated by regressing ln(fraction of light(z)) on depth z. Sampling Frequency: fortnightly during ice-free season - every 6 weeks during ice-covered season Number of sites: 7
Dataset ID
259
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
Light (PAR) extinction coefficient is calculated by linearly regressing ln (FRLIGHT (z)) on depth z where the intercept is not constrained. FRLIGHT(z) = LIGHT(z) or DECK(z) where LIGHT(z) is light measured at depth z and DECK(z) is light measured on deck (above water) at the same time. For open water light profiles, the surface light measurement (depth z = 0) is excluded from the regression. For winter light profiles taken beneath the ice, the first light data are taken at the bottom of the ice cover and are included in the regression. The depth of uppermost light value is equal to the depth of the ice adjusted by the water level in the sample hole, i.e., the depth below the surface of the water. The water level can be at, above or below the surface of the ice. If the water level was not recorded, it is assumed to be 0.0 and the calculated light extinction coefficient is flagged. If ice thickness was not recorded, a light extinction coefficient is not calculated. For light data collected prior to March, 2007, light values less than 3.0 (micromolesPerMeterSquaredPerSec) are excluded. For light data collected starting in March 2007, light values less than 1.0 (micromolesPerMeterSquaredPerSec) are excluded. Except for bog lakes before August 1989, a light extinction coefficient is not calculated if there are less than three FRLIGHT values to be regressed. For bog lakes before August 1989, a light extinction coefficient is calculated if there are least two FRLIGHT values to be regressed. In these cases, the light extinction coefficient is flagged as non-standard. FRLIGHT values should be monotonically decreasing with depth. For light profiles where this is not true, a light extinction coefficient is not calculated. For samples for which light data at depth are present, but the corresponding deck light are missing, a light extinction coefficient is calculated by regressing ln (LIGHT (z)) on depth z. Note that if actual deck light had remained constant during the recording of the light profile, the resulting light extinction coefficient is the same as from regressing ln(FRLIGHT(z)). In these cases, the light extinction coefficient is flagged as non-standard.
Short Name
NTLPH08
Version Number
16

Cascade Project at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Physical and Chemical Limnology 1984 - 2007

Abstract
Physical and chemical variables are measured at one central station near the deepest point of each lake. In most cases these measurements are made in the morning (0800 to 0900). Vertical profiles are taken at varied depth intervals. Chemical measurements are sometimes made in a pooled mixed layer sample (PML); sometimes in the epilimnion, metalimnion, and hypolimnion; and sometimes in vertical profiles. In the latter case, depths for sampling usually correspond to the surface plus depths of 50percent, 25percent, 10percent, 5percent and 1percent of surface irradiance.The 1991-1995 chemistry data obtained from the Lachat auto-analyzer. Like the process data, there are up to seven samples per sampling date due to Van Dorn collections across a depth interval according to percent irradiance. Voichick and LeBouton (1994) describe the autoanalyzer procedures in detail.Methods for 1984-1990 were described by Carpenter and Kitchell (1993) and methods for 1991-1997 were described by Carpenter et al. (2001).Carpenter, S.R. and J.F. Kitchell (eds.). 1993. The Trophic Cascade in Lakes. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England.Carpenter, S.R., J.J. Cole, J.R. Hodgson, J.F. Kitchell, M.L. Pace,D. Bade, K.L. Cottingham, T.E. Essington, J.N. Houser and D.E. Schindler. 2001. Trophic cascades, nutrients and lake productivity: whole-lake experiments. Ecological Monographs 71: 163-186.Number of sites: 8
Dataset ID
71
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
The 1991-1995 chemistry data obtained from the Lachat auto-analyzer. Like the process data, there are up to seven samples per sampling date due to Van Dorn collections across a depth interval according to percent irradiance. Voichick and LeBouton (1994) describe the autoanalyzer procedures in detail.Methods for 1984-1990 were described by Carpenter and Kitchell (1993) and methods for 1991-1997 were described by Carpenter et al. (2001).Carpenter, S.R. and J.F. Kitchell (eds.). 1993. The Trophic Cascade in Lakes. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England.Carpenter, S.R., J.J. Cole, J.R. Hodgson, J.F. Kitchell, M.L. Pace,D. Bade, K.L. Cottingham, T.E. Essington, J.N. Houser and D.E. Schindler. 2001. Trophic cascades, nutrients and lake productivity: whole-lake experiments. Ecological Monographs 71: 163-186.Number of sites: 8
Short Name
CPHYS1
Version Number
4
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