US Long-Term Ecological Research Network

WSC - Hourly meteorological data for Wibu field site, 2012-2013

Abstract
Hourly measurements of incoming shortwave radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, and wind speed for the Wibu field site. This is a site-specific synthesis of local monitoring equipment and the Arlington Automated Weather Observing Network station operated by UW Extension
Core Areas
Dataset ID
315
Data Sources
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Except for the dates/times below, data is from the Arlington Automated Weather Observing Network station operated by UW Extension.- Precipitation measured on-site from 5/17/2013 18:00 to 11/30/2013 23:00 using an Onset HOBO RG-3 tipping bucket rain gauge mounted on a post off the south edge of the field at site WIBU-9, elevation 1.5 m.- Temperature & relative humidity measured on-site from 5/4/2012 13:00 to 12/31/2013 23:00 using an Onset HOBO Pro v2 temp/RH sensor mounted at an elevation of 3.5 m on the north side of a telephone pole on the west edge of the field.
Version Number
15

Additional Daily Meteorological Data for Madison Wisconsin (1884-2010)

Abstract
These data are in addition to "Madison Wisconsin Daily Meteorological Data 1869-current." Additional variables added include: daily cloud cover, wind, solar radiation, vapor pressure, dew point temperature, total atmospheric pressure, and average relative humidity for Madison, Wisconsin. In addition, the adjustment factors which were applied on a given date to calculate the adjusted parameters in "Madison Wisconsin Daily Meteorological Data 1869-current" are also included in these data. Raw data, in English units, were assembled by Douglas Clark - Wisconsin State Climatologist. Data were converted to metric units and adjusted for temporal biases by Dale M. Robertson. For adjustments applied to various parameters see Robertson, 1989 Ph.D. Thesis UW-Madison. Adjusted data represent the BEST estimated daily data and may be raw data. Data collected at Washburn observatory, 8-1-1883 to 9-30-1904. Data collected at North Hall, 10-1-1904 to 12-31-1947 Data collected at Truax Field (Admin BLDG), 1-1-1948 to 12-31-1959. Data collected at Truax Field, center of field, 1-1-1960 to Present. Much of the data after 1990 were obtained in digital form from Ed Hopkins, UW-Meteorology. Data starting in 2002-2005 were obtained from Sullivan at http://www.weather.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=mkx%20 ,then go to CF6 and download monthly data to Madison_sullivan_conversion. Relative humidity data was obtained from 1986 to 1995 from CD's at the State Climatologist's Office. Since Robertson (1989) adjusted all historical data to that collected prior to 1989; no adjustments were applied to the recent data except for wind and estimated vapor pressure. Wind after January 1997, and only wind from the southwest after November 2007, was extended by Dale M. Robertson and Yi-Fang "Yvonne" Hsieh, see methods. Estimated vapor pressure after April 2002 was updated by Yvonne Hsieh, see methods.
Dataset ID
282
Date Range
-
Metadata Provider
Methods
Raw data (in English units) were assembled by Douglas Clark - Wisconsin State Climatologist. Data were converted to metric units and adjusted for temporal biases by Dale M. Robertson. For adjustments applied to various parameters see Robertson, 1989 Ph.D. Thesis UW-Madison. Adjusted data represent the BEST estimated daily data and may be raw data. Data collected at Washburn observatory, 8-1-1883 to 9-30-1904. Data collected at North Hall, 10-1-1904 to 12-31-1947 Data collected at Truax Field (Admin BLDG), 1-1-1948 to 12-31-1959. Data collected at Truax Field (Center of Field), 1-1-1960 to Present. Much of the data after 1990 were obtained in digital form from Ed Hopkins, UW-Meteorology. Data starting in 2002-05 were obtained from Sullivan at <a href="http://www.weather.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=mkx%20">http://www.weather.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=mkx</a> ,then go to CF6 and download monthly data to Madison_sullivan_conversion. Since Robertson (1989) adjusted all historical data to that collected from 1884-1989; no adjustments were applied to the recent data except for (1) wind and (2) estimated vapor pressure:(1) Wind after January 1997, and only wind from the southwest after November 2007, was extended by Dale M. Robertson and Yvonne Hsieh.In 1996, a discontinuity in the wind record was caused by change in observational techniques and sensor locations (Mckee et al. 2000). To address the non-climatic changes in wind speed, data from MSN were carefully compared with those collected from the tower of the Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Building at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, see http://ginsea.aos.wisc.edu/labs/mendota/index.htm. Hourly data from both sites (UMSN,hourly and UAOS,hourly) during 2003&ndash;2010 were used to form a 4&times;12 (four components of wind direction &times; 12 months) matrix (K4,12) of wind correction factors, yielding UAOS,daily= Ki,j&times;UMSN,daily. The comparison results indicated that the MSN weather station reported a higher magnitude in winds out of the east by 5% and lower magnitude in winds out of the west and south by 30% and 10%. The adjusted wind data (=Ki,j&times;UMSN,daily) were therefore employed and used in the model simulation. After adjustments, there was a decrease in wind velocities starting shortly before 1996. Overall the adjusted wind data had a decline in wind velocities of 16% from 1988&ndash;93 to 1994&ndash;2009) compared to a 7% decline at a nearby weather station with no known observational changes (St. Charles, Illinois; 150 km southeast of Lake Mendota). (2) Estimated vapor pressure was updated (after April 2002) by using the equation from DYRESM for estimation of vapor pressure (a function of both air temperature and dew point temperature); where a=7.5, b=237.3, and c=.7858.
Version Number
23

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Ice Duration - Trout Lake Area 1981 - current

Abstract
Data includes day of freeze-up and thaw dates of seven northern primary lakes (Allequash, Big Muskellunge, Crystal, Sparkling, Trout, unnamed 27-02 [Crystal Bog] and 12-15 [Trout Bog]) as well as historic data from Little Rock Lake. Observations are made approximately every other day during times of freeze and thaw. A lake is considered ice covered when the sampling station (the deepest part of the lake) is ice covered. The lake is considered thawed when it is possible to drive a boat from the boat landing to the sampling station without encountering ice. Sampling Frequency: annually. Number of sites: 8.
Dataset ID
32
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
Methods are described in abstract.
Short Name
NTLPH04
Version Number
29

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Ice Duration - Madison Lakes Area 1853 - current

Abstract
Data include dates of freeze-up, thaw, and ice duration of three primary lakes in the Madison area (Lake Mendota, Lake Monona, and Lake Wingra). Data are obtained from the State Climatologist. For Monona and Wingra, the freeze date (ice on) is defined as the first date on which the water body is observed to be completely ice covered, and the breakup date (ice off) is the date of the last breakup observed before the open water phase. Ice duration is the number of days that a water body is completely covered with ice and excludes any period during which the lake thawed in mid-winter before freezing again. For Mendota, duration is calculated in the same manner, but ice on and ice off dates are assigned as follows: The lake is deemed frozen if it has solid ice from Picnic Point to Maple Bluff and total ice cover is greater than 50 %. The lake is deemed open if it is ice-free from Picnic Point to Maple Bluff and total ice cover is less than 50%. Sampling Frequency: annually. Number of sites: 3.
Dataset ID
33
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
Methods are described in abstract.
Short Name
NTLPH05
Version Number
36

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Secchi Disk Depth; Other Auxiliary Base Crew Sample Data 1981 - current

Abstract
Secchi disk depth is measured in the deepest part of each lake for the eleven primary lakes (Allequash, Big Muskellunge, Crystal, Sparkling, Trout lakes, unnamed lakes 27-02 [Crystal Bog] and 12-15 [Trout Bog], Fish, Mendota, Monona and Wingra). The disk is circular, 20 cm in diameter, and has alternating black and white quadrants. It is lowered using a calibrated Kevlar rope to minimize stretching. Readings are made on the shaded side of the boat both with and without the aid of a plexiglass viewer. The points at which the disk disappears while being lowered and reappears while being raised are averaged to determine Secchi depth. Auxiliary data include time of day, air temperature, cloud cover, wave height, wind speed and direction and whether the lake was ice covered on the sampledate. Sampling Frequency: fortnightly during ice-free season - every 6 weeks during ice-covered season for the northern lakes. The southern lakes are similar except that sampling occurs monthly during the fall and typically only once during the winter (depending on ice conditions). Number of sites: 11
Dataset ID
31
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
see abstract for secchi disc measurements. Otherwise, these are observations made by the crew while out sampling.
Short Name
NTLPH03
Version Number
30

Minocqua Dam Monthly Meteorological Data at North Temperate Lakes LTER 1905 - current

Abstract
Minoqua Dam, Wisconsin. Meteorological measurements are being gathered at a site at the Minocqua Dam for these purposes: 1) to supplement the data from the raft on Sparkling Lake and 2) to provide standard meteorological measurements for the North Temperate Lakes site. The following parameters are measured and stored as monthly values: 1) mean daily air temperature, 2) mean maximum air temperature, 3) mean minimum air temperature, 4) total precipitation, and 5) total snowfall. Sampling Frequency: data averaged to monthly values Number of sites: 1
Dataset ID
19
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Metadata Provider
Methods
Standard National Weather Service weather station
Short Name
NTLME03
Version Number
28

Madison Wisconsin Daily Meteorological Data 1869 - current

Abstract
Daily air temperature, precipitation and snow depth data for Madison from 1869. For a full description of data prior to 1987 see Robertson, 1989 (Ph.D. Thesis). Raw data (in English units) prior to 1977 were assembled by Douglas Clark - Wisconsin State Climatologist. Data were converted to metric units and adjusted for temporal biases by Dale M. Robertson. Adjusted data represent the BEST estimated daily data and may be raw data. Daily temperature data prior to 1884 were estimated from 3 times per day sampling and biases are expected and should not be comparable with data after that time. For adjustments applied to various parameters see Robertson, 1989 Ph.D. Thesis UW-Madison. Douglas Clark had assembled and adjusted 1948 to 1977 data for his own research earlier. Data from 1989 to 1995 obtained from CD's at the Wis. State Climatologists Office. Air Temp adjusted to data at Truax Field. Data collected at Bascom Hall, 1-1-1869 to 9-30-1878. Data collected at North Hall, 10-1-1904 to 12-31-1947. Data collected at Browns Block, 10-1-1878 to 4-31-1883. Data collected at Truax Field (Admin BLDG), 1-1-1948 to 12-31-195. Data collected at North Hall, 5-1-1883 to 7-31-1883. Data collected at Truax Field (Center of Field), 1-1-1960 to Present. Data collected at Washburn observatory, 8-1-1883 to 9-30-1904. Wind data collected at Truax from 1-1-1947 to Present. Much of the data after 1990 were obtained in digital form from Ed Hopkins, UW-Meteorology Sampling Frequency: daily values Number of sites: 1
Dataset ID
20
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
For a full description of data prior to 1987 see Robertson, 1989 (Ph.D. Thesis). Raw data (in English units) prior to 1977 were assembled by Douglas Clark - Wisconsin State Climatologist. Data were converted to metric units and adjusted for temporal biases by Dale M. Robertson. Adjusted data represent the BEST estimated daily data and may be raw data. Daily temperature data prior to 1884 were estimated from 3 times per day sampling and biases are expected and should not be comparable with data after that time. For adjustments applied to various parameters see Robertson, 1989 Ph.D. Thesis UW-Madison. Douglas Clark had assembled and adjusted 1948 to 1977 data for his own research earlier. Data from 1989 to 1995 obtained from CD's at the Wis. State Climatologists Office. Air Temp adjusted to data at Truax Field. Data collected at Bascom Hall, 1-1-1869 to 9-30-1878. Data collected at North Hall, 10-1-1904 to 12-31-1947. Data collected at Browns Block, 10-1-1878 to 4-31-1883. Data collected at Truax Field (Admin BLDG), 1-1-1948 to 12-31-195. Data collected at North Hall, 5-1-1883 to 7-31-1883. Data collected at Truax Field (Center of Field), 1-1-1960 to Present. Data collected at Washburn observatory, 8-1-1883 to 9-30-1904. Wind data collected at Truax from 1-1-1947 to Present. Much of the data after 1990 were obtained in digital form from Ed Hopkins, UW-Meteorology Sampling Frequency: daily values Number of sites: 1
Short Name
NTLME04
Version Number
33

North Temperate Lakes LTER Meteorological Data - Woodruff Airport 1989 - current

Abstract
Meteorological measurements are being gathered at a site at the Noble F. Lee Municipal airport located at Woodruff, WI for three purposes: 1) to supplement the data from the raft on Sparkling Lake used for evaporation calculations, and 2) to provide standard meteorological measurements for the North Temperate Lakes site, and 3) to measure radiation for primary production studies in the study lakes at the site. The following parameters are measured at 1-minute intervals: 1) air temperature at 1.5 m above ground, 2) relative humidity at 1.5 m above ground, 3) wind speed and direction and peak windspeed at 3 m above ground, 4) total long-wave radiation, 5) total short-wave radiation, 6) photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), 7) total solar radiation, and 8) total precipitation. High resolution data is taken, typically at 10 minute intervals, as well as 1-hour and 24-hour averages: Half-hourly averages of PAR and shortwave radiation are also stored. Precipitation data are summed for 5-minute intervals during periods of detectable precipitation. Derived data included in this data set include dewpoint temperature and vapor pressure, as well as daily minimum and maximum values for some parameters. Data are automatically updated into the database every six hours. Sampling Frequency: varies for instantaneous sample. averaged to hourly, half-hourly and daily values from one minute samples Number of sites: 1. Date/time is Central Standard Time (GMT - 06:00) throughout the year.
Dataset ID
17
Date Range
-
Metadata Provider
Methods
The following parameters are measured at 1-minute intervals: 1) air temperature at 1.5 m above ground, 2) relative humidity at 1.5 m above ground, 3) wind speed and direction and peak windspeed at 3 m above ground, 4) total long-wave radiation, 5) total short-wave radiation, 6) photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), 7) total solar radiation, and 8) total precipitation. High resolution data is taken, typically at 10 minute intervals, as well as 1-hour and 24-hour averages: Half-hourly averages of PAR and shortwave radiation are also stored. Precipitation data are summed for 5-minute intervals during periods of detectable precipitation. Derived data included in this data set include dewpoint temperature and vapor pressure, as well as daily minimum and maximum values for some parameters. Data are automatically updated into the database every six hours. Sampling Frequency: varies for instantaneous sample. averaged to hourly, half-hourly and daily values from one minute samples Number of sites: 1
Short Name
NTLME01
Version Number
33

North Temperate Lakes LTER: High Frequency Water Temperature Data - Sparkling Lake Raft 1989 - current

Abstract
The instrumented raft on Sparkling Lake is equipped with a thermistor chain that measures water temperature from depths ranging from the surface to 18m at intervals from 0.5 to 3m throughout the water column. The surface temperature sensors are attached to floats so that they are as close to the surface as feasible. The raft on Sparkling Lake is also equipped with a dissolved oxygen sensor and meteorological sensors that provide fundamental information on lake thermal structure, weather conditions, evaporation rates, and lake metabolism. Estimating the flux of solutes to and from lakes requires accurate water budgets. Evaporation rates are a critical component of the water budget of lakes. Data from the instrumented raft on Sparkling Lake includes micrometeorological parameters from which evaporation can be calculated. Raft measurements of relative humidity and air temperature (2 m height), wind velocity (1, 2, and 3 m heights), and water temperatures are combined with measurements of total long-wave and short-wave radiation data from a nearby shore station to determine evaporation by the energy budget technique. Comparable evaporation estimates from mass transfer techniques are calibrated against energy budget estimates to produce a lake-specific mass transfer coefficient for use in estimating evaporation rates Sampling Frequency: one minute; averaged to hourly and daily values as well as higher resolution values such as 2 min and 10 min. Number of sites: 1
Dataset ID
5
Date Range
-
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
see abstract for methods description
Short Name
NTLEV02
Version Number
22

North Temperate Lakes LTER: High Frequency Meteorological and Dissolved Oxygen Data - Sparkling Lake Raft 1989 - current

Abstract
The instrumented raft on Sparkling Lake is equipped with a dissolved oxygen and CO2 sensors, a thermistor chain, and meteorological sensors that provide fundamental information on lake thermal structure, weather conditions, evaporation rates, and lake metabolism. Estimating the flux of solutes to and from lakes requires accurate water budgets. Evaporation rates are a critical component of the water budget of lakes. Data from the instrumented raft on Sparkling Lake includes micrometeorological parameters from which evaporation can be calculated. Raft measurements of relative humidity and air temperature (2 m height), wind velocity ( at 1, 2, and 3 m heights; but beginning in 2008, only at 2 m) ,and water temperatures (from thermistors placed throughout the water column at intervals varying from 0.5 to 3m) are combined with measurements of total long-wave and short-wave radiation data from a nearby shore station to determine evaporation by the energy budget technique. Comparable evaporation estimates from mass transfer techniques are calibrated against energy budget estimates to produce a lake-specific mass transfer coefficient for use in estimating evaporation rates. After correcting for flux to or from the atmosphere and vertical mixing within the water column, high frequency measurements of dissolved gases such as carbon dioxide and oxygen can be used to estimate gross primary productivity, respiration, and net ecosystem productivity, the basic components of whole lake metabolism. Other parameters measured include precipitation, wind direction (beginning in 2008), and barometric pressure (beginning in 2008). Sampling Frequency: one minute; averaged to hourly and daily values as well as higher resolution values such as 2 min and 10 min. Number of sites: 1
Core Areas
Dataset ID
4
Date Range
-
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
The instrumented raft on Sparkling Lake is equipped with a D-Opto dissolved oxygen sensor, a thermistor chain, and meteorological sensors that provide fundamental information on lake thermal structure, weather conditions, evaporation rates, and lake metabolism. Estimating the flux of solutes to and from lakes requires accurate water budgets. Evaporation rates are a critical component of the water budget of lakes. Data from the instrumented raft on Sparkling Lake includes micrometeorological parameters from which evaporation can be calculated. Raft measurements of relative humidity and air temperature (2 m height), wind velocity ( at 1, 2, and 3 m heights; but beginning in 2008, only at 2 m) ,and water temperatures (from thermistors placed throughout the water column at intervals varying from 0.5 to 3m) are combined with measurements of total long-wave and short-wave radiation data from a nearby shore station to determine evaporation by the energy budget technique. Comparable evaporation estimates from mass transfer techniques are calibrated against energy budget estimates to produce a lake-specific mass transfer coefficient for use in estimating evaporation rates. After correcting for flux to or from the atmosphere and vertical mixing within the water column, high frequency measurements of dissolved gases such as carbon dioxide and oxygen can be used to estimate gross primary productivity, respiration, and net ecosystem productivity, the basic components of whole lake metabolism. Other parameters measured include precipitation, wind direction (beginning in 2008), and barometric pressure (beginning in 2008). Sampling Frequency: one minute; averaged to hourly and daily values as well as higher resolution values such as 2 min and 10 min.Dissolved oxygen sensors: 2004-2006: Greenspan Technology series 1200; 2007-2016: Zebra-Tech Ltd. D-Opto; 2018+: OTT HydrolabCO2 sensors: 2018+: ProOceanos MiniCO2 for dissolved CO2; Eosense Inc. eosGP for atmospheric CO2
Short Name
NTLEV01
Version Number
33
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