US Long-Term Ecological Research Network
River Nutrient Uptake and Transport at North Temperate Lakes LTER (2005-2011)

Abstract

These data were collected by Stephen Michael Powers and collaborators for his Ph.d. research, documented in his dissertation: River Nutrient Uptake and Transport Across Extremes in Channel Form and Drainage Characteristics. A major goal of this research was to better understand how ecosystem form and landscape setting dictate aquatic biogeochemical functioning and elemental transport through rivers. To achieve this goal, major and minor ions were measured in both northern and southern Wisconsin streams located in a variety of land use settings. In total, 27 different streams were sampled at 104 different stations (multiple stations per system) from both groundwater and surface water sources. Organic and inorganic carbon and nitrogen pools were also measured in northern and southern Wisconsin streams. The streams that were sampled in northern Wisconsin flow through wetland ecosystems. In sampling such streams, the goal was to better understand how wetland ecosystems influence river nutrient deliveries. There is a large amount of stream chemistry data for Big Spring Creek, WI; where the influence of a small reservoir on solute transportation and transformation was studied in an agricultural watershed. All stream chemistry data is incorporated in a single data file, Water Chemistry 2005-2011. While the data is not included in the dissertation, a sediment core study was also done in the small reservoir and channel of Big Spring (BS) Creek, WI. The results of this study are featured in three data tables: BS Creek Sediment Core Analysis, BS Creek Sediment Core Chemistry, and BS Creek Longitudinal Profile. Finally, two data tables list the geospatial information of sampling sites for stream chemistry and sediment coring in Big Spring Creek. Documentation: Powers, S.M., 2012. River nutrient uptake and transport across extremes in channel form and drainage characteristics. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. The University of Wisconsin - Madison, United States -- Wisconsin, p. 140.
Dataset ID
281

Data Citation Suggestion

Powers, S. and E. Stanley. 2014. River Nutrient Uptake and Transport at North Temperate Lakes LTER (2005-2011) ver 2. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/16d2a519bcb283fedb7efc605512e870. Accessed 2021-08-05.

Date Range

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Data Download

Major and minor ions were measured in both northern and southern Wisconsin streams located in a variety of land use settings. In total, 27 different streams were sampled at 104 different stations (multiple stations per system) from both groundwater and surface water sources. In addition, organic and inorganic carbon and nitrogen pools were measured in northern and southern Wisconsin streams. This data file also includes some temperature, conductivity, and total suspended solids data. See separate data file for geographic information on the streams and sites sampled.
The stream names and stations along with associated latitude and longitude values, and WDNR assigned WBIC. In total, 27 different streams were sampled at 104 different stations (multiple stations per system) from both groundwater and surface water sources. The stream name for 11 of the stations is unknown, consequently the total number of streams could be less than 27 as it was assumed that each unknown station belonged to a separate stream.
These data are from two sediment coring events in Big Spring Creek, WI (wbic=176400). The first sediment coring event took place on June 10, 2005 where 19 different coring stations were sampled in both the floodplain and channel of the Big Spring Reservoir (Big Spring Pond). The second coring event took place on June 24, 2005 when channel cores were taken in the channel of Big Spring Creek at 12 different coring stations. In total 31 unique coring stations were sampled. These data present the results of hydrometer and seive analysis.
These data are the results of the chemical analysis of sediment core samples taken in Big Spring Creek, WI (wbic=176400). Chemical analysis were done on samples collected on two different sampling dates, June 10, 2005 and June 24, 2005. The samples collected on June 10, 2005 were collected from the floodplain and channel of the Big Spring Reservoir (Big Spring Pond). The samples collected on June 24, 2005 were collected from the channel of Big Spring Creek. The locations where sediment cores were taken are the same as Stephen Powers Dissertation: Big Spring Creek Sediment Analysis, however sub-samples of sediment cores were collected for chemical analysis. In total samples were collected and analyzed for 31 different sampling sites. The analytes that were measured include NH4, KCl-NH4, NO3, KCl-NO3, SRP, and NaOH-P.
A standard longitudinal stream profile was conducted at Big Spring Creek, WI (wbic=176400) on unknown date(s). It is speculated that the profile was done during the summer of 2005, during which the rest of the data for Big Spring Creek was collected. Measurements for the profile began at the Big Spring Dam site (43.67035,-89.64225), a dam which was subsequently removed. The first (x_dist, y_dist) of (2.296, 5.57) corresponds to the location where the stream crosses Golden Court Road, whereas the second coordinate pair of (-2.615, -36.303) corresponds to the point below the previous Big Spring Creek Dam site. The third (x_dist, y_dist) of (-9.472, 7.681) corresponds to the top of the dam gates and is assigned a distance=0 as it is the starting point.
The core station names and geospatial information for the sediment cores taken in Big Spring Creek and the Big Spring Reservoir (Pond)wbic= 176400.