US Long-Term Ecological Research Network
Fluxes project at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Hydrology Scenarios Model Output

Abstract

A spatially-explicit simulation model of hydrologic flow-paths was developed by Matthew C. Van de Bogert and collaborators for his PhD project, "Aquatic ecosystem carbon cycling: From individual lakes to the landscape." The model is coupled with an in-lake carbon model and simulates hydrologic flow paths in groundwater, wetlands, lakes, uplands, and streams. The goal of this modeling effort was to compare aquatic carbon cycling in two climate scenarios for the North Highlands Lake District (NHLD) of northern Wisconsin: one based on the current climate and the other based on a scenario with warmer winters where lakes and uplands do not freeze, hereinafter referred to as the "no freeze" scenario. In modeling this "no freeze" scenario the same precipitation and temperature data as the current climate model was used, however temperature inputs were artificially floored at 0 degrees Celsius. While not discussed in his dissertation, Van de Bogert considered two other climate scenarios each using the same precipitation and temperature data as the current climate scenario. These scenarios involved running the model after artificially raising and lowering the current temperature data by 10 degrees Celsius. Thus, four scenarios were considered in this modeling effort, the current climate scenario, the "no freeze" scenario, the +10 degrees scenario, and the -10 degrees scenario. These data are the outputs of the model under the different scenarios and include average monthly temperature, average monthly rainfall, average monthly snowfall, total monthly precipitation, daily evapotranspiration, daily surface runoff, daily groundwater recharge, and daily total runoff. Note that the results of how temperature inputs influence aquatic carbon cycling under these different scenarios is not included in this data set, refer to Van de Bogert (2011) for this information. Documentation: Van de Bogert, M.C., 2011. Aquatic ecosystem carbon cycling: From individual lakes to the landscape. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. The University of Wisconsin - Madison, United States -- Wisconsin, p. 156.
Dataset ID
286

Data Citation Suggestion

M. Van de Bogert, S. Carpenter, and P. Hanson. 2013. Fluxes project at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Hydrology Scenarios Model Output ver 1. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/a7c681f1094f6bee427294edadd4902a. Accessed 2021-08-05.

Data Download

A spatially-explicit simulation model of hydrologic flow-paths was developed by Matthew C. Van de Bogert and collaborators for his Phd project, " Aquatic ecosystem carbon cycling: From individual lakes to the landscape." The model is coupled with an in-lake carbon model and simulates hydrologic flow paths in groundwater, wetlands, lakes, uplands, and streams. The goal of this modeling effort was to compare aquatic carbon cycling in two climate scenarios for the North Highlands Lake District (NHLD) of northern Wisconsin: one based on the current climate and the other based on a scenario with warmer winters where lakes and uplands do not freeze, hereinafter referred to as the "no freeze" scenario. In modeling this "no freeze scenario" the same precipitation and temperature data as the current climate model was used, however temperature inputs were artificially floored at 0 degrees Celsius. While not discussed in his dissertation, Van de Bogert considered two other climate scenarios each using the same precipitation and temperature data as the current climate scenario. These scenarios involved running the model after artificially raising and lowering the current temperature data by 10 degrees Celsius. Thus, four scenarios were considered in this modeling effort, the current climate scenario, the "no freeze" scenario, the +10 degrees scenario, and the -10 degrees scenario.