US Long-Term Ecological Research Network

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Chemical Limnology of Lake Mendota: Major Ions 1940 - 1995

Abstract
Chloride, Sodium and Sulfate concentrations in Lake Mendota. 1940 - 1987 data are annual averages collected and processed by Richard Lathrop Lathrop, R. C. (1988). Chloride and sodium trends in the Yahara lakes. Bureau of Research, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. 1988 - 1995 data are collected by the Wisconsins DNR and are also available in Storet.
Core Areas
Dataset ID
319
Date Range
-
DOI
10.6073/pasta/6deb8490027da04e2b257cb258ffe5f3
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
1940 - 1987 data are annual averages collected and processed by Richard Lathrop Lathrop, R. C. (1988). Chloride and sodium trends in the Yahara lakes. Bureau of Research, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. 1988 - 1995 data are collected by the Wisconsins DNR and are also available in Storet.
Version Number
17

River Nutrient Uptake and Transport at North Temperate Lakes LTER (2005-2011)

Abstract
These data were collected by Stephen Michael Powers and collaborators for his Ph.d. research, documented in his dissertation: River Nutrient Uptake and Transport Across Extremes in Channel Form and Drainage Characteristics. A major goal of this research was to better understand how ecosystem form and landscape setting dictate aquatic biogeochemical functioning and elemental transport through rivers. To achieve this goal, major and minor ions were measured in both northern and southern Wisconsin streams located in a variety of land use settings. In total, 27 different streams were sampled at 104 different stations (multiple stations per system) from both groundwater and surface water sources. Organic and inorganic carbon and nitrogen pools were also measured in northern and southern Wisconsin streams. The streams that were sampled in northern Wisconsin flow through wetland ecosystems. In sampling such streams, the goal was to better understand how wetland ecosystems influence river nutrient deliveries. There is a large amount of stream chemistry data for Big Spring Creek, WI; where the influence of a small reservoir on solute transportation and transformation was studied in an agricultural watershed. All stream chemistry data is incorporated in a single data file, Water Chemistry 2005-2011. While the data is not included in the dissertation, a sediment core study was also done in the small reservoir and channel of Big Spring (BS) Creek, WI. The results of this study are featured in three data tables: BS Creek Sediment Core Analysis, BS Creek Sediment Core Chemistry, and BS Creek Longitudinal Profile. Finally, two data tables list the geospatial information of sampling sites for stream chemistry and sediment coring in Big Spring Creek. Documentation: Powers, S.M., 2012. River nutrient uptake and transport across extremes in channel form and drainage characteristics. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. The University of Wisconsin - Madison, United States -- Wisconsin, p. 140.
Dataset ID
281
Date Range
-
Metadata Provider
Methods
I. Stream chemistry sample collection methods: core-sediment core was taken from the benthic zone of the streamgeopump-geopump used to pump stream water into collection bottlegrab-collection bottle filled with stream water by hand and filtered in the fieldgrabfilter- stream water collected by hand and filtered in field. Unfiltered and filtered samples placed in separate collection bottles.isco- sample collected by use of an ISCO automated samplerpoint- sampled collected by method outlined in patent US8337121sedimentgrab- sediment sample taken in field by hand and placed in collection bottlesyringe- sample collected from stream by syringe and placed in collection bottlesyringe_filter- sample collected from stream by syringe filter. Unfiltered and filtered samples placed in separate collection bottles. II. Stream chemistry analytical methods: All water samples were kept on ice and in the dark following collection, then were either acidified (TN/TP, TDN/TDP) or frozen until analysis (all other analytes).no32_2- This is NO<sub>3-</sub>N which is operationally defined as nitrate nitrogen + nitrite nitrogen. Determined by flow injection analysis on Astoria Pacific Instruments Autoanalyzer (APIA).nh4_n, tn1, tp1, tdn, tdp- All analytes measured by flow injection analysis on Astoria Pacific Instruments Autoanalyzer (APIA).srp- measured colorometrically using the molybdate blue method [APHA 1995] and a Beckman spectrophotometer.doc- measured using a Shimadzu carbon analyzer.doc_qual- the goal in doing this analysis is to determine the source of dissolved organic carbon (doc) measured in a particular riverine ecosystem. This was achieved by UV absorbance which provides an estimate of the aromaticity of the doc in a sample, and by extension, the potential source of the doc.cl, no2, no3, br, and so4- all measured by ion chromatography. See http://www.nemi.gov; method number 4110C. Detection limits for method number 4110C: cl-20&micro;g/l, no2-15&micro;g/l, no3-17&micro;g/l, br-75&micro;g/l, and so4-75&micro;g/l.ysi_cond, do, ph_field, wtemp- all measured by use of a standard YSI meter.tss- measured by standard methods. A thoroughly mixed sample is filtered and dried at 103-105 degreesCelcius. The obtained residue represents the amount of solids suspended in the sample solution. See http://www.nemi.giv; method number D5907.tot_om- measured by standard methods. The residue obtained from the tss procedure is ignited at 550 degreesCelcius and weighed, the difference in weight representing total volatile solids. Total volatile solids represents the portion of the residue that is composed of organic molecules. See http://www.nemi.gov; method number 160.4.turbid- measured by use of a nephelometer. III. Big Spring Sediment Coring Methods A. Field Methods- collecting sediment coresSediment core samples taken with WDNR piston core samplerB. Sediment Analysis- HydrometerDocumentation: Robertson, G.P., Coleman, D.C., Bledsoe, C.S. and Sollins, P., 1999. Standard Soil Methods for Long-Term Ecological Research. Oxford University Press, New York, 462 pp.Hydrometer Analysis- procedure used to determine percent clay:<p style="margin-left:.25in;">1. Dry the sample in a pre-weighed aluminum pan for at least 24 hr at 105 C. Make sure sample is completely dry before weighing.<p style="margin-left:.25in;">2. Weigh the dried sample, then ash for at least 8 hr at 550 C. Make sure to break up any large clumps before ashing.<p style="margin-left:.25in;">3. Weigh the ashed sample, then crush any aggregates with a pestal. Mix sample thoroughly.<p style="margin-left:.25in;">4. Transfer 40g, plus or minus one gram, of the sample into a 500mL wide mouth bottle<p style="margin-left:.25in;">5. Add 10g of sodium hexametaphosphate to the bottle.<p style="margin-left:.25in;">6. Add approx 200mL of deionized water to bottle. Shake vigorously with hand.<p style="margin-left:.25in;">7. Stir samples on shaker table for at least 8 hr at speed 40. Putting them in a box and fastening with bungee cords works best.<p style="margin-left:.25in;">8. Transfer sample to 1L cylinder, making sure to get all of sample out of bottle. Fill cylinder with deionized water up to the 1L mark.<p style="margin-left:.25in;">9. Prepare a blank cylinder by adding 10g of sodium hexametaphosphate and filling to 1L.<p style="margin-left:.25in;">10. Allow all cylinders to equilibrate to room temperature ( approx 30 min).<p style="margin-left:.25in;">11. Starting with the blank cylinder, put stopper into cylinder and shake end-over-end for approx 5 min. Rinse stopper. Repeat this step for all cylinders, rinsing stopper between cylinders.<p style="margin-left:.25in;">12. Record the time that you stopped shaking each cylinder.<p style="margin-left:.25in;">13. At 1.5 hr from time of shaking, record temperature and hydrometer level of the blank cylinder. Then record the 1.5 hr hydrometer level for each successive cylinder.<p style="margin-left:.25in;">14. At 24 hr from time of shaking, record temperature and hydrometer level of the blank cylinder. Then record the 24 hr hydrometer level for each successive cylinder. Sieve Analysis- procedure used to determine quantity of sand and silt<p style="margin-left:.25in;">1. After hydrometer analysis, pour the entire sample into the .063mm sieve. Rinse the sample thoroughly until all the clay is out. Try to break up any clay clumps you see.<p style="margin-left:.25in;">2. Transfer the sample to a pre-weighed and labeled aluminum pan. You will probably need to backwash the sieve to get the entire sample out. You can use a syringe to pull water from the pan if it gets too full. Dry the sample for 48 hours at 50-60C.<p style="margin-left:.25in;">3. Before transferring the dried sample to the sieves, make sure you pre-weigh the sieves and put their weight on the data sheet. You will need to do this before every sample as you might not get all the sample out of the sieves from the previous sample. Stack the sieves in the following order, top to bottom : 4mm, 2mm, 1mm, 0.5mm, 0.25mm, 0.125mm, 0.063mm, and pan. Pour the sample into the top sieve. Place the lid on, located on sieve shaker, and put the stack of sieves into the sieve shaker. Fasten the tie downs. Set shaker for 3 minutes. <p style="margin-left:.25in;">4. Remove stack of sieves from shaker. It&rsquo;s ok to leave the pan behind temporarily as it might be tight. Weigh each sieve and record the weight in the data sheet. If you see any clay clumps, break them up with your fingers and re-shake the stack a little, using hands is okay.<p style="margin-left:.25in;">5. Dump the sample out in the trash and clean the sieve with the brush. At the end of the day it might be necessary to backwash the sieves with water and dry overnight in the oven. <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> Calculations:1. percent clay was determined by the hydrometer analysis- P1.5, P24, X1.5, X24, and m are the variables that were calculated to determine percent clay by the hydrometer analysis.P1.5= ((sample hydrometer reading at 1.5 hours- blank hydrometer reading at 1.5 hours)/ (sample weight)) multiplied by 100.P24= ((sample hydrometer reading at 24 hours- blank hydrometer reading at 24 hours)/ (sample weight)) multiplied by 100X1.5= 1000*(.00019*(-.164* (sample hydrometer reading at 1.5 hours)+16.3)<sup>2</sup> *8100X24=1000*(.00019*(-.164* (sample hydrometer reading at 24 hours)+16.3)<sup>2</sup> *8100m= (P1.5-P24)/(ln(X1.5/X24))percent clay = m * ln(2/X24)) + P24clay (grams) = total weight * ( percent clay/ 100)2. percent Sand and percent Silt were determined based on the results of the sieve analysis which determined the grams of sand and silt.percent sand= total weight * (percent sand/ 100)percent silt= total weight * (percent silt/ 100)3. Othersorganic matter (grams) was calculated in this analysis as dry weight (grams) &ndash; ashed weight (grams)percwnt organic matter was calculated as ((organic matter (grams))/(total dry weight (grams)) multiplied by 100 C. Sediment Chemical Analysis1. SRP/ NaOH-PChemical analysis was done according to the protocol outlined in Pionke and Kunishi (1992). Each sample was first centrifuged and separated into aqueous and sediment fractions. The sediment fraction was then dried. The aqueous fraction was analyzed for soluble reactive phosphorus (srp) by automated colorimetry Nemi Method Number 365.4; see http://www.nemi.gov. NaOH P was then determined by NaOH extractions as described in Pionke and Kunishi (1992). Documentation: Pionke HB, Kunishi HM (1992) Phosphorus status and content of suspended sediment in a Pennsylvania watershed. Soil Sci 153:452&ndash;462.2. NH4 / KCl-NH4 The exact procedure that was used to analyze samples for ammonium is unknown. However, it is known that a KCl extraction was used. The KCl-NH4 was calculated as the concentration of ammonium in milliGramsPerLiter divided by the sediment weight in grams. 3. NO3 / KCl-NO3The exact procedure that was used to analyze samples for nitrate is also unknown. Again, it is known that a KCL extraction was used. The KCl-NO3 was calculated as the concentration of nitrate in milliGramsPerLiter divided by the sediment weight in grams.Note: The same sediment sample was used to measure ammonium and nitrate IV. Big Spring Creek Longitudinal Profile A standard longitudinal stream profile was conducted at Big Spring Creek, WI (wbic=176400) on unknown date(s). It is speculated that the profile was done during the summer of 2005, during which the rest of the data for Big Spring Creek was collected. Measurements for the profile began at the Big Spring Dam site (43.67035,-89.64225), a dam which was subsequently removed. The first (x_dist, y_dist) of (2.296, 5.57) corresponds to the location where the stream crosses Golden Court Road, whereas the second coordinate pair of (-2.615, -36.303) corresponds to the point below the previous Big Spring Creek Dam site. The third (x_dist, y_dist) of (-9.472, 7.681) corresponds to the top of the dam gates and is assigned a distance=0 as it is the starting point.
Version Number
23

Trout Lake USGS Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) Stream Data 1975-current

Abstract
This data was collected by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) for the Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budget Project. The data set is primarily composed of water chemistry variables, and was collected from four USGS stream gauge stations in the Northern Highland Lake District of Wisconsin, near Trout Lake. The four USGS stream gauge stations are Allequash Creek at County Highway M (USGS-05357215), Stevenson Creek at County Highway M (USGS-05357225), North Creek at Trout Lake (USGS-05357230), and the Trout River at Trout Lake (USGS-05357245), all near Boulder Junction, Wisconsin. The project has collected stream water chemistry data for a maximum of 36 different chemical parameters,. and three different physical stream parameters: temperature, discharge, and gauge height. All water chemistry samples are collected as grab samples and sent to the USGS National Water Quality Lab in Denver, Colorado. There is historic data for Stevenson Creek from 1975-1977, and then beginning again in 1991. The Trout Lake WEBB project began during the summer of 1991 and sampling of all four sites continues to date.
Creator
Dataset ID
276
Date Range
-
Maintenance
Completed.
Metadata Provider
Methods
DL is used to represent “detection limit” where known.NOTE (1): Each method listed below corresponds with a USGS Parameter Code, which is listed after the variable name. NOTE (2): If the NEMI method # is known, it is also specified at the end of each method description.NOTE (3): Some of the variables are calculated using algorithms within QWDATA. If this is the case see Appendix D of the NWIS User’s Manual for additional information. However, appendix D does not list the algorithm used by the USGS. If a variable is calculated with an algorithm the term: algor, will be listed after the variable name.anc: 99431, Alkalinity is determined in the field by using the gran function plot methods, see TWRI Book 9 Chapter A6.1. anc_1: 90410 and 00410, Alkalinity is determined by titrating the water sample with a standard solution of a strong acid. The end point of the titration is selected as pH 4.5. See USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 57, NEMI method #: I-2030-89.2. c13_c12_ratio: 82081, Exact method unknown. The following method is suspected: Automated dual inlet isotope ratio analysis with sample preparation by precipitation with ammoniacal strontium chloride solution, filtration, purification, acidified of strontium carbonate; sample size is greater than 25 micromoles of carbon; one-sigma uncertainty is approximately ± 0.1 ‰. See USGS Determination of the delta13 C of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon in Water, RSIL Lab Code 1710. Chapter 18 of Section C, Stable Isotope-Ratio Methods Book 10, Methods of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory.3. ca, mg, mn, na, and sr all share the same method. The USGS parameter codes are listed first, then the method description with NEMI method #, and finally DL’s:ca- 00915, mg- 00925, mn- 01056, na- 00930, sr- 01080All metals are determined simultaneously on a single sample by a direct reading emission spectrometric method using an inductively coupled argon plasma as an excitation source. Samples are pumped into a crossflow pneumatic nebulizer, and introduced into the plasma through a spray chamber and torch assembly. Each analysis is determined on the basis of the average of three replicate integrations, each of which is background corrected by a spectrum shifting technique except for lithium (670.7 nm) and sodium (589.0 nm). A series of five mixed-element standards and a blank are used for calibration. Method requires an autosampler and emission spectrometry system. See USGS OF 93-125, p 101, NEMI Method #: I-1472-87.DL’s: ca- .02 mg/l, mg-.01 mg/l, mn-1.0 ug/l, na- .2 mg/l, sr- .5 ug/l4. cl, f, and so4 all share the same method. The USGS parameter codes are listed first, then the method description with NEMI method #, and finally DL’s:cl- 00940, f-00950, so4-00945All three anions (chloride, flouride, and sulfate) are separated chromatographically following a single sample injection on an ion exchange column. Ions are separated on the basis of their affinity for the exchange sites of the resin. The separated anions in their acid form are measured using an electrical conductivity cell. Anions are identified on the basis of their retention times compared with known standards. 19 The peak height or area is measured and compared with an analytical curve generated from known standards to quantify the results. See USGS OF 93-125, p 19, NEMI method #: I-2057.DL’s: cl-.2 mg/l, f-.1 mg/l, so4-.2 mg/lco2: 00405, algor, see NWIS User's Manual, QW System, Appendix D, Page 285.co3: 00445, algor.color: 00080, The color of the water is compared to that of the colored glass disks that have been calibrated to correspond to the platinum-cobalt scale of Hazen (1892), See USGS TWRI 5-A1 or1989, P.191, NEMI Method #: I-1250. DL: 1 Pt-Co colorconductance_field: 00094 and 00095, specific conductance is determined in the field using a standard YSI multimeter, See USGS TWRI 9, 6.3.3.A, P. 13, NEMI method #: NFM 6.3.3.A-SW.conductance_lab: 90095, specific conductance is determined by using a wheat and one bridge in which a variable resistance is adjusted so that it is equal to the resistance of the unknown solution between platinized electrodes of a standardized conductivity cell, sample at 25 degrees celcius, See USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 461, NEMI method #: I-1780-85.dic: 00691, This test method can be used to make independent measurements of IC and TC and can also determine TOC as the difference of TC and IC. The basic steps of the procedure are as follows:(1) Removal of IC, if desired, by vacuum degassing;(2) Conversion of remaining inorganic carbon to CO<sub>2</sub> by action of acid in both channels and oxidation of total carbon to CO<sub>2</sub> by action of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in the TC channel. For further information, See ASTM Standards, NEMI method #: D6317. DL: n/adkn: 00623 and 99894, Organic nitrogen compounds are reduced to the ammonium ion by digestion with sulfuric acid in the presence of mercuric sulfate, which acts as a catalyst, and potassium sulfate. The ammonium ion produced by this digestion, as well as the ammonium ion originally present, is determined by reaction with sodium salicylate, sodium nitroprusside, and sodium hypochlorite in an alkaline medium. The resulting color is directly proportional to the concentration of ammonia present, see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 327, NEMI method #: 351.2. DL: .10 mg/Ldo: 0300, Dissolved oxygen is measured in the field with a standard YSI multimeter, NEMI Method #: NFM 6.2.1-Lum. DL: 1 mg/L.doc: 00681, The sample is acidified, purged to remove carbonates and bicarbonates, and the organic carbon is oxidized to carbon dioxide with persulfate, in the presence of an ultraviolet light. The carbon dioxide is measured by nondispersive infrared spectrometry, see USGS OF 92-480, NEMI Method #: O-1122-92. DL: .10 mg/L.don: 00607, algor, see NWIS User's Manual, QW System, Appendix D, page 291.dp: 00666 and 99893, All forms of phosphorus, including organic phosphorus, are converted to orthophosphate ions using reagents and reaction parameters identical to those used in the block digester procedure for determination of organic nitrogen plus ammonia, that is, sulfuric acid, potassium sulfate, and mercury (II) at a temperature of 370 deg, see USGS OF Report 92-146, or USGS TWRI 5-A1/1979, p 453, NEMI method #: I-2610-91. DL= .012 mg/L.fe: 01046, Iron is determined by atomic absorption spectrometry by direct aspiration of the sample solution into an air-acetylene flame, see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1985, NEMI method #: I-1381. DL= 10µg/L.h_ion: 00191, algor.h20_hardness: 00900, algor.h20_hardness_2: 00902, algor.hco3: 00440, algor.k: 00935, Potassium is determined by atomic absorption spectrometry by direct aspiration of the sample solution into an air-acetylene flame , see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 393, NEMI method #: I-1630-85. DL= .01 mg/L.n_mixed: 00600, algor.n_mixed_1: 00602, algor.n_mixed_2: 71887, algor.nh3_nh4: 00608, Ammonia reacts with salicylate and hypochlorite ions in the presence of ferricyanide ions to form the salicylic acid analog of indophenol blue (Reardon and others, 1966; Patton and Crouch, 1977; Harfmann and Crouch, 1989). The resulting color is directly proportional to the concentration of ammonia present, See USGS OF 93-125, p 125/1986 (mg/l as N), NEMI Method #: I-2525. DL= .01 mg/L.nh3_nh4_1: 71846, algor.nh3_nh4_2: 00610, same method as 00608, except see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 321. DL = .01 mg/L.nh3_nh4_3: 71845, algor.no2: 00613, Nitrite ion reacts with sulfanilamide under acidic conditions to form a diazo compound which then couples with N-1-naphthylethylenediamine dihydrochloride to form a red compound, the absorbance of which is measured colorimetrically, see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 343, NEMI method #: I-2540-90. DL= .01 mg/L.no2_2: 71856, algor.no3: 00618, Nitrate is determined sequentially with six other anions by ion-exchange chromatography, see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, P. 339, NEMI method #: I-2057. DL= .05 mg/L.no3_2: 71851, algor.no32: 00630, An acidified sodium chloride extraction procedure is used to extract nitrate and nitrite from samples of bottom material for this determination(Jackson, 1958). Nitrate is reduced to nitrite by cadmium metal. Imidazole is used to buffer the analytical stream. The sample stream then is treated with sulfanilamide to yield a diazo compound, which couples with N-lnaphthylethylenediamine dihydrochloride to form an azo dye, the absorbance of which is measured colorimetrically. Procedure is used to extract nitrate and nitrite from bottom material for this determination (Jackson, 1958), see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 351. DL= .1 mg/Lno32_2: 00631, same as description for no32, except see USGS OF 93-125, p 157. DL= .1 mg/L.o18_o16_ratio: 82085, Sample preparation by equilibration with carbon dioxide and automated analysis; sample size is 0.1 to 2.0 milliliters of water. For 2-mL samples, the 2-sigma uncertainties of oxygen isotopic measurement results are 0.2 ‰. This means that if the same sample were resubmitted for isotopic analysis, the newly measured value would lie within the uncertainty bounds 95 percent of the time. Water is extracted from soils and plants by distillation with toluene; recommended sample size is 1-5 ml water per analysis, see USGS Determination of the Determination of the delta (18 O or 16O) of Water, RSIL Lab Code 489.o2sat: Dissolved oxygen is measured in the field with a standard YSI multimeter, which also measures % oxygen saturation, NEMI Method #: NFM 6.2.1-Lum.ph_field: 00400, pH determined in situ, using a standard YSI multimeter, see USGS Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations, book 9, Chaps. A1-A9, Chap. A6.4 "pH," NEMI method # NFM 6.4.3.A-SW. DL= .01 pH.ph_lab: 00403, involves use of laboratory pH meter, see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 363, NEMI method #: I-1586.po4: 00660, algor, see NWIS User's Manual, QW System, Appendix D, Page 286.po4_2: 00671, see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, NEMI method #: I-2602. DL= .01 mg/L.s: 63719, cannot determine exact method used. USGS method code: 7704-34-9 is typically used to measure sulfur as a percentage, with an DL =.01 µg/L. It is known that the units for sulfur measurements in this data set are micrograms per liter.sar: 00931, algor, see NWIS User's Manual, QW System, Appendix D, Page 288.si: 00955, Silica reacts with molybdate reagent in acid media to form a yellow silicomolybdate complex. This complex is reduced by ascorbic acid to form the molybdate blue color. The silicomolybdate complex may form either as an alpha or beta polymorph or as a mixture of both. Because the two polymorphic forms have absorbance maxima at different wavelengths, the pH of the mixture is kept below 2.5, a condition that favors formation of the beta polymorph (Govett, 1961; Mullen and Riley, 1955; Strickland, 1952), see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 417, NEMI method #: I-2700-85. DL= .10 mg/L.spc: 00932, algor, see NWIS User's Manual, QW System, Appendix D, Page 289.tds: 70300 and 70301, A well-mixed sample is filtered through a standard glass fiber filter. The filtrate is evaporated and dried to constant weight at 180 deg C, see " Filterable Residue by Drying Oven," NEMI method #: 160.1, DL= 10 mg/l. Note: despite DL values occur in the data set that are less than 10 mg/l.tds_1: 70301, algor, see NWIS User's Manual, QW System, Appendix D, Page 289.tds_2: 70303, algor, see NWIS User's Manual, QW System, Appendix D, Page 290.tkn: 00625 and 99892, Block digester procedure for determination of organic nitrogen plus ammonia, that is, sulfuric acid, potassium sulfate, and Mercury (II) at a temperature of 370°C. See the USGS Open File Report 92-146 for further details. DL: .10 mg/L.toc: 00680, The sample is acidified, purged to remove carbonates and bicarbonates, and the organic carbon is oxidized to carbon dioxide with persulfate, in the presence of an ultraviolet light. The carbon dioxide is measured by nondispersive infrared spectrometry, see USGS TWRI 5-A3/1987, p 15, NEMI Method #: O-1122-92. DL=.10 mg/L.ton: 00605, algor, See NWIS User's Manual, QW System, Appendix D, page 286.tp: 00665 and 99891, This method may be used to analyze most water, wastewater, brines, and water-suspended sediment containing from 0.01 to 1.0 mg/L of phosphorus. Samples containing greater concentrations need to be diluted, see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 367, NEMI method #: I-4607. tp_2: 71886, algor.tpc: 00694, The basic steps of this test method are:1) Conversion of remaining IC to CO2 by action of acid, 2) Removal of IC, if desired, by vacuum degassing, 3) Split of flow into two streams to provide for separate IC and TC measurements, 4) Oxidation of TC to CO2 by action of acid-persulfate aided by ultraviolet (UV) radiation in the TC channel, 5) Detection of CO2 by passing each liquid stream over membranes that allow the specific passage of CO2 to high-purity water where change in conductivity is measured, and 6) Conversion of the conductivity detector signal to a display of carbon concentration in parts per million (ppm = mg/L) or parts per billion (ppb = ug/L). The IC channel reading is subtracted from the TC channel reading to give a TOC reading, see ASTM Standards, NEMI Method #: D5997. DL= .06 µg/L.tpn: 49570, A weighed amount of dried particulate (from water) or sediment is combusted at a high temperature using an elemental analyzer. The combustion products are passed over a copper reduction tube to covert nitrogen oxides to molecular nitrogen. Carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and water vapor are mixed at a known volume, temperature, and pressure. The concentrations of nitrogen and carbon are determined using a series of thermal conductivity detectors/traps, measuring in turn by difference hydrogen (as water vapor), carbon (as carbon dioxide), and nitrogen (as molecular nitrogen). Procedures also are provided to differentiate between organic and inorganic carbon, if desired, see USEPA Method 440, NEMI method #: 440. DL= .01 mg/L.
Short Name
TL-USGS-WEBB Data
Version Number
15

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Groundwater Chemistry 1984 - current

Abstract
Water chemistry is measured annually in 11 monitoring wells to characterize regional groundwater chemistry in the Trout Lake area. The chemical parameters measured include pH, conductivity, total alkalinity, disolved inorganic and organic carbon, total nitrogen, nitrae, ammonia, total phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, soium, potassium, chloride, sulfate, iron, manganese, total silica and dissolved reactive silica. Chemical data areavailable at a quarterly sampling frequency for some years. In addition (see related data set - Groundwater Level), water levels in 37 monitoring wells are measured several times per year. The wells are scattered throughout the Trout Lake hydrological basin and the data are used to calibrate and test regional groundwater flow models. Sampling Frequency: annually - with some earlier data from quarterly sampling Number of sites: 11
Dataset ID
10
Date Range
-
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
Ammonium, Nitrate, Nitrit Samples for ammonium and nitrate or nitrite are collected together with a peristaltic pump and tubing and in-line filtered (through a 0.40 micron polycarbonate filter) into new, 20 ml HDPE plastic containers with conical caps. The samples are stored frozen until analysis, which should occur within 6 months. The samples are analyzed for ammonium (and nitrateornitrite) simultaneously by automated colorimetric spectrophotometry, using a segmented flow autoanalyzer. Ammonium is determined by utilizing the Berthelot Reaction, producing a blue colored indophenol compound, where the absorption is monitored at 660 nm. The detection limit for ammonium is approximately 3 ppb and the analytical range for the method extends to 4000 ppb. The detection limit for nitrateornitrite is approximately 2 ppb and the analytical range for the method extends to 4000 ppb. Method Log: Prior to January 2006 samples, ammonium was determined on a Technicon segmented flow autoanalyzer. From 2006 to present, ammonium is determined by an Astoria-Pacific Astoria II segmented flow autoanalyzer. Chloride, Sulfate Samples for chloride and sulfate are collected together with a peristaltic pump and tubing and in-line filtered (through a 0.40 micron polycarbonate filter) into new, 20 ml HDPE plastic containers with conical caps. The samples are stored refrigerated at 4 degrees Celsius until analysis, which should occur within 6 months. The samples are analyzed for chloride (and sulfate) simultaneously by Ion Chromatography, using a hydroxide eluent. The detection limit for chloride is approximately 0.01 ppm and the analytical range for the method extends to 100 ppm. The detection limit for sulfate is approximately 0.01 ppm and the analytical range for the method extends to 60 ppm. Method Log: Prior to January 1998 samples, chloride was determined on a Dionex DX10 Ion Chromatograph, using a chemical fiber suppressor. From 1998 to 2011, chloride was determined by a Dionex model DX500, using an electro-chemical suppressor. From January 2011 until present, chloride is determined by a Dionex model ICS 2100 using an electro-chemical suppressor. Calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, iron, and manganese Samples for calcium analysis (as well as dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, iron, and manganese) are collected together with a peristaltic pump and tubing and in-line filtered (through a 40 micron polycarbonate filter) into 120 ml LDPE bottles and acidified to a 1percent HCl matrix by adding 1 ml of ultra pure concentrated HCl to 100 mls of sample. For every sample acidification event, three acid blanks are created by adding the same acid used on the samples to 100 mls of ultra pure water supplied from the lab. Once acidified, the samples are stable at room temperature until analysis, which should occur within one year. Until acidification, the samples should be refrigerated at 4 degrees Celsius. Calcium, as well as magnesium, sodium, potassium, iron, and manganese are analyzed simultaneously on an optical inductively-coupled plasma emission spectrophotometer (ICP-OES). The acidified samples are directly aspirated into the instrument without a digestion. Calcium is analyzed at 317.933 nm and at 315.887 nm and viewed axially for low-level analysis and radially for high level analysis. The detection limit for calcium is 0.06 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 50 ppm. The detection limit for iron is 0.02 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 20 ppm. The detection limit for magnesium is 0.03 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 50 ppm. The detection limit for manganese is 0.01 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 2 ppm. The detection limit for potassium is 0.06 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 10 ppm. The detection limit for sodium is 0.06 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 50 ppm. Method Log: Prior to January 2002, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, iron, and manganese were determined on a Perkin-Elmer model 503 Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. Lanthanum at a 0.8percent concentration was added as a matrix modifier to suppress chemical interferences. From January 2002 to present, samples are analyzed for calcium on a Perkin-Elmer model 4300 DV ICP. Inorganic and organic carbon Samples for inorganic and organic carbon are collected together with a peristaltic pump and tubing and in-line filtered, if necessary, (through a 0.40 micron polycarbonate filter) into glass, 24 ml vials (that are compatible with the carbon analyzer autosampler), and capped with septa, leaving no head space. The samples are stored refrigerated at 4 degrees Celsius until analysis, which should occur within 2-3 weeks. The detection limit for inorganic carbon is 0.15 ppm, and the analytical range for the method is 60 ppm. The detection limit for organic carbon is 0.30 ppm and the analytical range for the method is 30 ppm. Method Log: Prior to May 2006 samples, inorganic carbon was analyzed by phosphoric acid addition on an OI Model 700 Carbon Analyzer. From May 2006 to present, inorganic carbon is still analyzed by phosphoric acid addition, but on a Shimadzu TOC-V-csh Total Organic Carbon Analyzer. Method Log: Prior to May 2006 samples, organic carbon was analyzed by heated persulfate digestion on an OI Model 700 Carbon Analyzer. From May 2006 to present, Organic carbon is analyzed by combustion, on a Shimadzu TOC-V-csh Total Organic Carbon Analyzer. Dissolved reactive silicon Samples for silicon are collected with a peristaltic pump and tubing and in-line filtered (through a 40 micron polycarbonate filter) into 120 ml LDPE bottles and acidified to a 1percent HCl matrix by adding 1 ml of ultra pure concentrated HCl to 100 mls of sample. For every sample acidification event, three acid blanks are created by adding the same acid used on the samples to 100 mls of ultra pure water supplied from the lab. Once acidified, the samples are stable at room temperature until analysis, which should occur within one year. Until acidification, the samples should be refrigerated at 4 degrees Celsius. Dissolved reactive silica is determined by the Heteropoly Blue Method and the absorption is measured at 820 nm. The detection limit for silicon is 6 ppb and the analytical range is 15000 ppb. Method Log These determinations were performed manually using a Bausch and Lomb Spectrophotometer from the beginning of the project until April 1984. From 1984 through 2005, dissolved reactive silicon was determined on a Technicon Auto Analyzer II. From January 2006 to present, samples are run on an Astoria-Pacific Astoria II Autoanalyzer. total and dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus Samples for total and dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus analysis are collected together with a peristaltic pump and tubing and in-line filtered, when necessary, (through a 40 micron polycarbonate filter) into 120 ml LDPE bottles and acidified to a 1percent HCl matrix by adding 1 mL of ultra pure concentrated HCl to 100 mls of sample. For every sample acidification event, three acid blanks are created by adding the same acid used on the samples to 100 mls of ultra pure water supplied from the lab. Once acidified, the samples are stable at room temperature until analysis, which should occur within one year. Until acidification, the samples should be refrigerated at 4 degrees Celsius. The samples must first be prepared for analysis by adding an NaOH–Persulfate digestion reagent and heated for an hour at 120 degrees C and 18-20 psi in an autoclave. The samples are analyzed for total nitrogen and total phosphorus simultaneously by automated colorimetric spectrophotometry, using a segmented flow autoanalyzer. Total nitrogen is determined by utilizing the automated cadmium reduction method, as described in Standard Methods, where the absorption is monitored at 520 nm. The detection limit for total and dissolved nitrogen is approximately 21 ppb and the analytical range for the method extends to 2500 ppb. The detection limit for total phosphorus is approximately 3 ppb and the analytical range for the method extends to 800 ppb. Method Log: Prior to January 2006 samples, total nitrogen was determined on a Technicon segmented flow autoanalyzer. From 2006 to present, total nitrogen is determined by an Astoria-Pacific Astoria II segmented flow autoanalyzer. pH We sample at the deepest part of the lake using a peristaltic pump and tubing, monthly during open water and approximately every five weeks during ice cover. We collect two types of pH samples at each sampling depth: one in 20ml vials with cone cap inserts to exclude all air from the vial, and one in 125ml bottles to be air equilibrated before analysis. The depths for sample collection are based on thermal stratification: top and bottom of the epilimnion, mid thermocline, and top, middle,and bottom of the hypolimnion. During mixis we sample at the surface, mid water column, and bottom. We analyze for pH the same day that samples are collected, keeping them cold and dark until just before analysis. Samples are warmed to room temperature in a dark container, and the air equilibrated samples are bubbled with outside air for at least 15 minutes prior to measurement. We measure pH using a Radiometer combination pH electrode and Orion 4Star pH meter. Protocol Log: 1981-1988 -- used a PHM84 Research pH meter. 1986 -- began analyzing air equilibrated pH. 1988 - July 2010 -- used an Orion model 720 pH meter.</p>
Short Name
NTLGW02
Version Number
23

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Chemical Limnology of Primary Study Lakes: Major Ions 1981 - current

Abstract
Parameters characterizing the major ions of the eleven primary lakes (Allequash, Big Muskellunge, Crystal, Sparkling, Trout, bog lakes 27-02 [Crystal Bog], and 12-15 [Trout Bog], Mendota, Monona, Wingra and Fish) are measured at one station in the deepest part of each lake at the top and bottom of the epilimnion, mid-thermocline, and top, middle, and bottom of the hypolimnion. These parameters include chloride, sulfate, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, iron, manganese, and specific conductance (northern lakes only). Sampling Frequency: quarterly (winter, spring and fall mixis, and summer stratified periods) Number of sites: 11
Core Areas
Dataset ID
2
Date Range
-
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
Chloride, Sulfate Samples for chloride and sulfate are collected together with a peristaltic pump and tubing and in-line filtered (through a 0.40 micron polycarbonate filter) into new, 20 ml HDPE plastic containers with conical caps. The samples are stored refrigerated at 4 degrees Celsius until analysis, which should occur within 6 months. The samples are analyzed for chloride (and sulfate) simultaneously by Ion Chromatography, using a hydroxide eluent. The detection limit for chloride is approximately 0.01 ppm and the analytical range for the method extends to 100 ppm. The detection limit for sulfate is approximately 0.01 ppm and the analytical range for the method extends to 60 ppm. Method Log: Prior to January 1998 samples, chloride was determined on a Dionex DX10 Ion Chromatograph, using a chemical fiber suppressor. From 1998 to 2011, chloride was determined by a Dionex model DX500, using an electro-chemical suppressor. From January 2011 until present, chloride is determined by a Dionex model ICS 2100 using an electro-chemical suppressor.
Short Name
NTLCH02
Version Number
34

Little Rock Lake Experiment at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Major Ions 1996 - 2000

Abstract
The Little Rock Acidification Experiment was a joint project involving the USEPA (Duluth Lab), University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, University of Wisconsin-Superior, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Little Rock Lake is a bi-lobed lake in Vilas County, Wisconsin, USA. In 1983 the lake was divided in half by an impermeable curtain and from 1984-1989 the northern basin of the lake was acidified with sulfuric acid in three two-year stages. The target pHs for 1984-5, 1986-7, and 1988-9 were 5.7, 5.2, and 4.7, respectively. Starting in 1990 the lake was allowed to recover naturally with the curtain still in place. Data were collected through 2000. The main objective was to understand the population, community, and ecosystem responses to whole-lake acidification. Funding for this project was provided by the USEPA and NSF. Parameters characterizing the major ions of the treatment and reference basins of Little Rock Lake are measured at one station in the deepest part of each basin at the top and bottom of the epilimnion, mid-thermocline, and top, middle, and bottom of the hypolimnion. These parameters include chloride, sulfate, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, iron, and manganese Sampling Frequency: varies - Number of sites: 2
Core Areas
Dataset ID
247
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Chloride, SulfateSamples for chloride and sulfate are collected together with a peristaltic pump and tubing and in-line filtered (through a 0.40 micron polycarbonate filter) into new, 20 ml HDPE plastic containers with conical caps. The samples are stored refrigerated at 4 degrees Celsius until analysis, which should occur within 6 months. The samples are analyzed for chloride (and sulfate) simultaneously by Ion Chromatography, using a hydroxide eluent.The detection limit for chloride is approximately 0.01 ppm and the analytical range for the method extends to 100 ppm.The detection limit for sulfate is approximately 0.01 ppm and the analytical range for the method extends to 60 ppm.Method Log: Prior to January 1998 samples, chloride was determined on a Dionex DX10 Ion Chromatograph, using a chemical fiber suppressor. From 1998 to 2011, chloride was determined by a Dionex model DX500, using an electro-chemical suppressor. From January 2011 until present, chloride is determined by a Dionex model ICS 2100 using an electro-chemical suppressor.
Short Name
LRMAJION1
Version Number
4

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Northern Highlands Stream Chemistry Survey 2006

Abstract
We compared regional patterns in lake and stream biogeochemistry in the Northern Highlands Lake District (NHLD), Wisconsin, USA to ask how regional biogeochemistry differs as a function of the type of ecosystem considered (i.e., lakes versus streams); if lake-stream comparisons reveal regional patterns and processes that are not apparent from studies of a single ecosystem type; and if characteristics of streams and lakes scale similarly. Fifty-two streams were sampled using a stratified random design to determine regional distribution of 21 water chemistry variables during summer baseflow conditions.Sampling Frequency: once per site Number of sites: 52
Contact
Core Areas
Dataset ID
254
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Site SelectionBecause lakes are a dominant feature of the region and stream characteristics could potentially differ based on their hydrologic connections to lakes, we classified streams into three categories as a function of their hydrologic connections to lakes. The first category was streams that had no lakes within the drainage network upstream of the sampling location. The second category was streams that originated from headwater lakes (i.e., no stream inlet but a stream outlet) and the headwater lake was the only lake in the drainage network above the sampling location. The final category had at least a single drainage lake (i.e., a lake with both stream inlet(s) and outlet) in the drainage network above the sampling location. We then used these categories to select sampling sites using a stratified random design for a variety of chemical and physical characteristics.All streams identified on 1:24,000 7.5 inch USGS topographical maps that crossed access points were selected as potential sampling locations and assigned to one of the three stream types. A stream could be classified by more than a single category depending on the sampling location within the drainage network. However, a single drainage network was never sampled more than once to ensure sample independence. Of the 500 possible sampling locations, 52 sites were selected and sampled.SamplingAll streams were sampled 7-10 channel widths upstream of an access point to minimize any influences caused by culverts and other features. Water samples were collected from the center of the channel using a peristaltic pump. Stream discharge was measured after Gore (2007) using cross sectional area and water velocity.Chemical AnalysesAll samples for both studies were collected and processed following the North Temperate Long Term Ecological Research (NTL-LTER) protocols (http://lter.limnology.wisc.edu). Filtering was done in the field using an in-line 0.45 μm membrane filter. All samples were stored on ice and returned to the laboratory where they were preserved according to NTL-LTER protocols. Acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) was determined by Gran titration (APHA 2005). DOC was measured on a Shimadzu TOC-V carbon analyzer. Total nitrogen and phosphorus (unfiltered, TN and TP; filtered, TDN and TDP), nitrate+nitrite (NO3-N), and ammonium (NH4-N) were quantified with an Astoria-Pacific segmented flow auto-analyzer. Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) in streams was measured colormetrically on a Beckman DU-800 spectrophotometer (APHA 2005). Anions (Cl- and SO4 2-) were measured using a Dionix DX-500 ion chromatograph and cations (Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe, K, and Mn) on a Perkin Elmer ICP mass spectrometerDissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and pH were quantified differently in the lakes and stream data sets. For the lakes data, DIC was determined with a Shimadzu TOC-V carbon analyzer, whereas DIC for the streams dataset was determined by headspace equilibration of acidified water samples in the field and direct measurement of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas on a Shimadzu gas chromatograph (Cole et al. 1994). pH measurements for the lakes dataset were quantified on non-air equilibrated samples in the lab with a Accumet 950 pH meter while direct measurements were taken in the field for the streams dataset using a hand-held Orion model 266 pH meter that was allowed to equilibrated about 20 min in the center for the stream channel.Several variables presented in this study were determined from calculations based on measured values. In streams, dissolved organic nitrogen and phosphorus (DON and DOP, respectively) were determined by the difference between inorganic nutrients and total dissolved nutrients (e.g., DOP = TDP-SRP). We were unable to determine DON in lakes due to the lack of inorganic nitrogen data. It was assumed that DOP approximately equals TDP in lakes because dissolved inorganic phosphorus concentrations in the region are typically below detection limits in the epilimnion during the summer months and consequently not quantified (NTL-LTER unpublished data).
Short Name
LOTTIG2
Version Number
19

Landscape Position Project at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Chemical Limnology 1998 - 2000

Abstract
Parameters characterizing the chemical limnology and spatial attributes of 51 lakes were surveyed as part of the Landscape Position Project. Parameters are measured at or close to the deepest part of the lake. The following parameters are measured one meter from the surface and two meters from the bottom of the lake: pH, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, total silica. The following parameters are measured one meter from the surface: dissolved organic carbon, total organic carbon, dissolved inorganic carbon, total inorganic carbon, spectrophotometric absorbance (color scan), major anions and cations, alkalinity. Sampling Frequency: once for conservative parameters (major ions, carbon, color, alkalinity); monthly for one summer for other parameters (chlorophyll, nitrogen, phosphorus, pH, silica, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and conductivity) Number of sites: 51Allequash Lake, Anderson Lake, Arrowhead Lake, Beaver Lake, Big Lake, Big Crooked Lake, Big Gibson Lake, Big Muskellunge Lake, Boulder Lake, Brandy Lake, Crampton Lake, Crystal Lake, Diamond Lake, Flora Lake, Heart Lake, Ike Walton Lake, Island Lake, Johnson Lake, Katherine Lake, Kathleen Lake, Katinka Lake, Lehto Lake, Little Crooked Lake, Little Muskie, Little Spider Lake, Little Sugarbush Lake, Little Trout Lake, Lower Kaubeshine Lake, Lynx Lake, McCullough Lake, Mid Lake, Minocqua Lake, Muskesin Lake, Nixon Lake, Partridge Lake, Randall Lake, Round Lake, Sanford Lake, Sparkling Lake, Statenaker Lake, Stearns Lake, Tomahawk Lake, Trout Lake, Upper Kaubeshine Lake, Verna Lake, Ward Lake, White Birch Lake, White Sand Lake, Wild Rice Lake, Wildcat Lake, Wolf Lake, Vilas County, WI, Iron County, WI, Oneida County, WI, Gogebic County, MI, USA
Dataset ID
91
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Chloride, SulfateSamples for chloride and sulfate are collected together with a peristaltic pump and tubing and in-line filtered (through a 0.40 micron polycarbonate filter) into new, 20 ml HDPE plastic containers with conical caps. The samples are stored refrigerated at 4 degrees Celsius until analysis, which should occur within 6 months. The samples are analyzed for chloride (and sulfate) simultaneously by Ion Chromatography, using a hydroxide eluent.The detection limit for chloride is approximately 0.01 ppm and the analytical range for the method extends to 100 ppm.The detection limit for sulfate is approximately 0.01 ppm and the analytical range for the method extends to 60 ppm.Method Log: Prior to January 1998 samples, chloride was determined on a Dionex DX10 Ion Chromatograph, using a chemical fiber suppressor. From 1998 to 2011, chloride was determined by a Dionex model DX500, using an electro-chemical suppressor. From January 2011 until present, chloride is determined by a Dionex model ICS 2100 using an electro-chemical suppressor.Calcium, silicon, magnesium, sodium, potassium, iron, and manganeseSamples for calcium analysis (as well as dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus, silicon, magnesium, sodium, potassium, iron, and manganese) are collected together with a peristaltic pump and tubing and in-line filtered (through a 40 micron polycarbonate filter) into 120 ml LDPE bottles and acidified to a 1percent HCl matrix by adding 1 ml of ultra pure concentrated HCl to 100 mls of sample. For every sample acidification event, three acid blanks are created by adding the same acid used on the samples to 100 mls of ultra pure water supplied from the lab. Once acidified, the samples are stable at room temperature until analysis, which should occur within one year. Until acidification, the samples should be refrigerated at 4 degrees Celsius.Calcium, as well as magnesium, sodium, potassium, iron, and manganese are analyzed simultaneously on an optical inductively-coupled plasma emission spectrophotometer (ICP-OES). The acidified samples are directly aspirated into the instrument without a digestion. Calcium is analyzed at 317.933 nm and at 315.887 nm and viewed axially for low-level analysis and radially for high level analysis.The detection limit for calcium is 0.06 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 50 ppm.The detection limit for iron is 0.02 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 20 ppm.The detection limit for magnesium is 0.03 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 50 ppm.The detection limit for manganese is 0.01 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 2 ppm.The detection limit for potassium is 0.06 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 10 ppm.The detection limit for sodium is 0.06 ppm with an analytical range of the method extends to 50 ppm.Method Log: Prior to January 2002, Calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, iron, and manganese were determined on a Perkin-Elmer model 503 Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. Lanthanum at a 0.8percent concentration was added as a matrix modifier to suppress chemical interferences. From January 2002 to present, samples are analyzed for calcium on a Perkin-Elmer model 4300 DV ICP.Dissolved reactive silica is determined by the Heteropoly Blue Method and the absorption is measured at 820 nm.The detection limit for silicon is 6 ppb and the analytical range is 15000 ppb.Method Log These determinations were performed manually using a Bausch and Lomb Spectrophotometer from the beginning of the project until April 1984. From 1984 through 2005, dissolved reactive silicon was determined on a Technicon Auto Analyzer II. From January 2006 to present, samples are run on an Astoria-Pacific Astoria II Autoanalyzer.
Short Name
LPPCHEM1
Version Number
9

Zooplankton of Small Lakes and Wetland Ponds in Wisconsin - North Temperate Lakes LTER 1996

Abstract
We sampled zooplankton communities from 54 small water bodies distributed throughout Wisconsin to evaluate whether a snap-shot of zooplankton community structure during early spring could be used for the purpose of differentiating lakes from wetlands. We collected a single set of zooplankton and water chemistry data during a one-month time window (synchronized from south to north across the state) from an open water site in each basin as a means to minimize and standardize sampling effort and to minimize cascading effects arising from predator-prey interactions with resident and immigrant aquatic insect communities. We identified 53 taxa of zooplankton from 54 sites sampled across Wisconsin. There was an average of 6.83 taxa per site. The zooplankton species were distributed with a great deal of independence. We did not detect significant correlations between number of taxa and geographic region or waterbody size. There was a significant inverse correlation between number of taxa and the concentration of calcium ion, alkalinity and conductivity. One pair of taxa, Lynceus brachyurus and Chaoborus americanus, showed a significant difference in average duration of sites of their respective occurrence. All other pairs of taxa had no significant difference in average latitude, waterbody surface area, total phosphorus, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, alkalinity, conductivity, calcium ion, sulfate, nitrate, silicate or chloride. Taxa were distributed at random among the sites - there were no statistically significant pairs of taxa occurring together or avoiding each other. Multivariate analysis of zooplankton associations showed no evidence of distinct associations that could be used to distinguish lakes from wetlands. Zooplankton community structure appears to be a poor tool for distinguishing between lakes and wetlands, especially at the relatively large scale of Wisconsin (dimension of about 500 km). The data suggest that a small body of water in Wisconsin could be classified as a wetland if it persists in the spring and summer for only about 4 months, and if it is inhabited by Lynceus brachyurus, Eubranchipus bundyi, and if Chaoborus americanus and Chydorus brevilabris are absent. Schell, Jeffery M., Carlos J. Santos-Flores, Paula E. Allen, Brian M. Hunker, Scott Kloehn, Aaron Michelson, Richard A. Lillie, and Stanley I. Dodson. 2001. Physical-chemical influences on vernal zooplankton community structure in small lakes and wetlands of Wisconsin, U.S.A. Hydrobiologia 445:37-50 Number of sites: 54
Creator
Dataset ID
224
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Schell, Jeffery M., Carlos J. Santos-Flores, Paula E. Allen, Brian M. Hunker, Scott Kloehn, Aaron Michelson, Richard A. Lillie, and Stanley I. Dodson. 2001. Physical-chemical influences on vernal zooplankton community structure in small lakes and wetlands of Wisconsin, U.S.A. Hydrobiologia 445:37-50
Short Name
DODSON3
Version Number
25

Historical Birge - Juday Lake Survey 1900 - 1943

Abstract
Data collected by Birge, Juday, and collaborators, mostly in north-central Wisconsin, from 1900 through 1943; generally one sampling event per lake during the summer, but on some lakes, especially around Trout Lake Station, several sampling events for several successive years. This data set contains both surface data (depth of zero) and multi-depth data. Note that not all variables were measured on all lakes. Documentation: Johnson, M.D. (1984) Documentation and quality assurance of the computer files of historical water chemistry data from the Wisconsin Northern Highland Lake District (the Birge and Juday data).Wisconsin DNR Technical Report. Note: Values of -99999 in water quality data indicate trace amount of parameter was present. Number of sites: 663 (generally one sampling point per lake; occasionally, several sampling points per lake on multibasin, large lakes).<u> Note:</u> This data set was updated in 2013 to include multi-depth and additional surface data for a large subset of lakes. These additions expanded the number of sites from 605 to 663, and expanded the date range from 1925-1942 to 1900-1943 . Furthermore, 14 lakes in Minnesota were added to the data set contributing additional surface and multi-depth data. Another dataset was added in 2013 collected by Wisconsin limnologists Chauncey Juday and Edward Birge, this data set contains variables that are still commonly used in research. For example, temperature, dissolved carbon dioxide, color, pH, secchi disk, plankton, and silica. However, the data set also includes variables that are not commonly used, for example, crude protein, non-amino nitrogen, ether extract, and total organic and inorganic material. These data are characteristic of water chemistry analysis from the time in which they were compiled (5/31/1915 - 8/29/1938). The data set features data from 586 different lakes, primarily lakes in the Northern Highland Lakes District of Wisconsin. However, there is also data from lakes in southeastern and southcentral Wisconsin. Furthermore, there is a minimal amount of data from lakes in Minnesota, Ohio,New York, Alaska, the Philippines, and the United Kingdom. Documentation:Birge, E.A., and Juday, C. 1922. The inland lakes of Wisconsin. The Plankton I. Its quantity and chemical composition. Bulletin, Wis. Geol. and Nat. Hist. Survey No. 64: (Scientific series 13), ix-222.
Core Areas
Dataset ID
106
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Johnson, M.D. (1984) Documentation and quality assurance of the computer files of historical water chemistry data from the Wisconsin Northern Highland Lake District (the Birge and Juday data).Wisconsin DNR Technical Report.Methods not included in Johnson (1984):Nitrite Nitrogen- Sulphanilic acid procedure. Standard methods for the examination of water and sewage, Pub. Health Assn., New York, 5th edition, 1923, 13. Other Documentation: Domogalla, B.P., Juday, C., and Peterson, W.H. 1925. The forms of nitrogen found in certain lake waters. Jour. Biol. Chem. 63: 269-285.Ferric Ion- First calculated by subtracting ferrous ion from total iron measurements. Standard methods of water analysis. 1936. Amer. Pub. Health Assoc. P. 309. New York. Procedure was modified to determine ferric ion by acidifying samples by adding 1 milliliter of 3 N HCL to 50mL of lake water. With the iron samples in readiness, add 5 ml of the thiocyanate solution to the sample and to the standards, mix and compare immediately. (Standard Methods, Amer. Public Health Assoc. 8th ed., p. 75, 1936). Other documentation: Domogalla, B.P., Juday, C., and Peterson, W.H. 1925. The forms of nitrogen found in certain lake waters. Jour. Biol. Chem. 63: 269-285.Ferrous Ion- First calculated by ferricyanide method. Procedure was modified to determine ferrous ion by subtracting ferric ion from total iron. Documentation: Domogalla, B.P., Juday, C., and Peterson, W.H. 1925. The forms of nitrogen found in certain lake waters. Jour. Biol. Chem. 63: 269-285.Manganese- Determined by the persulfate method using the procedure described in Standard Methods of Water Analysis, Amer. Public Health Assoc., p. 84, 1936.Chlorophyll-a- A photometric method was used, in which the color of the light was confined to the wave-length 6200-6800 A which are absorbed by chlorophyll. Water samples of 5 to 15 liters (18 liters in the case of very low plankton content) were taken from different depths by using a hand operated vacuum pump), the water was the centrifuged at 25,000 rpm (for about 30 minutes). Residue was then washed with 98percent acetone, and CaCO3 was added to neutralize organic acids. This residue-acetone mixture was ground to extract the chlorophyll. The acetone extract was then filtered through filter paper into a flask, the residue being thoroughly washed with pure acetone. The light absorption of the extract was then measured. Procedure was carried out in a single day, under minimal light. Documentation: Kemmerer, G.I., and Hallett, L.T. 1938. Amount and distribution of the chlorophyll in some lakes of northeastern Wisconsin. Trans. Wisconsin Acad. Sci. 31: 411-438.Phosphate- Ceruleomolybdic method employed. Documentation: Juday, C., Birge, E.A., Kemmerer, G.I., Robinson, R.J. 1927. Phosphorus content of lake waters of northeastern Wisconsin. Trans. Wisconsin. Acad. Sci. 23: 233-248. Other Documentation: Robinson, R.J., Kemmerer, G.I. 1930. Determination of organic phosphorus in lake waters. Trans. Wisconsin. Acad. Sci. 25: 117-121.Redox Potential- Determined in situ on a given sampling date by use of a bright platinum electrode. Eh readings were made in millivolts. Documentation: Allgeier, R.J., Hafford, B.C., and Juday, C. 1941. Oxidation-reduction potentials and pH of lake waters and lake sediments. Trans. Wisconsin Acad. Sci. 33: 115-133.Note: The methodology used to determine copper, alumnium, boron, and hydrogen sulfide could not be determined.
Short Name
RGBIJD
Version Number
18
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