US Long-Term Ecological Research Network

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Physical Limnology of Lake Kegonsa and Lake Waubesa 1995 - current

Abstract
Parameters characterizing the physical limnology of Lakes Waubesa and Kegonsa are measured at one station in the deepest part of each lake at 0.5-m to 1-m depth intervals. Measured parameters in the data set include water temperature and dissolved oxygen, as well as the derived parameter percent oxygen saturation.Number of sites: 2Sampling Frequency: bi-weekly during ice-free season from late March or early April through early September, then every 4 weeks through late November; sampling is conducted usually once during the winter (depending on ice conditions).
Dataset ID
264
Date Range
-
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
G. Reading Temperature and Dissolved Oxygen 1. Before leaving to sample a lake, check to make sure that there are no air bubbles under the probe membrane of the YSI TemperatureorDissolved Oxygen meter. If there are air bubbles or if it has been several months since changing the membrane (or if the instrument does not calibrate well or the oxygen readings wander), change the membrane as explained in the manual. Note: We have always used the Standard membranes. If adding water to new membrane fluid bottle (KCl), make sure to add Milli-Q water and not the CFL distilled water. 2. Be sure to always store the probe in 100percent humidity surrounded by a wet sponge or paper towel. 3. Turn on the temperatureordissolved oxygen meter at least 30 minutes before using it. It is best to turn it on before leaving to sample a lake as it uses up batteries slowly. 4. Calibrate the meter using the chart on the back of the instrument (adjusted to the Madison altitude - 97percent oxygen saturation). Leave the plastic cap on the probe (at 100percent humidity). The temperature should not be changing during the calibration. Zero the instrument. When the temperature equilibrates, adjust the oxygen to correspond to the chart. After calibrating the instrument, switch the knob to percent oxygen saturation to make sure it is close to 97percent. 5. Take readings at 1 meter intervals making sure to gently jiggle the cord when taking the oxygen readings (to avoid oxygen depletion). Jiggling the cord is not necessary if using a cable with a stirrer. Take half meter readings in the metalimnion (when temperature andoror oxygen readings exhibit a greater change with depth). A change of temperature greater than 1degreeC warrants half-meter intervals. 6. Record the bottom depth using the markings on the temp.oroxygen meter cord and take a temperature and dissolved oxygen reading with the probe lying on the lake bottom. Dont forget to jiggle the probe to remove any sediment. 7. If any readings seem suspicious, check them again when bringing the probe back up to the surface. You can also double check the calibration after bringing the probe out of the water (and putting the cap back on).
Short Name
KEWAPH01
Version Number
21

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Physical Limnology of Primary Study Lakes 1981 - current

Abstract
Parameters characterizing the physical limnology of the eleven primary lakes (Allequash, Big Muskellunge, Crystal, Sparkling, Trout, bog lakes 27-02 [Crystal Bog] and 12-15 [Trout Bog], Mendota, Monona, Wingra and Fish) are measured at one station in the deepest part of each lake at 0.25-m to 1-m depth intervals depending on the lake. Measured parameters in the data set include water temperature, vertical penetration of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; not measured on lakes Mendota, Monona, Wingra, and Fish), dissolved oxygen, as well as the derived parameter percent oxygen saturation. Sampling Frequency: fortnightly during ice-free season - every 6 weeks during ice-covered season for the northern lakes. The southern lakes are similar except that sampling occurs monthly during the fall and typically only once during the winter (depending on ice conditions). Number of sites: 11
Core Areas
Dataset ID
29
Date Range
-
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
Light (PAR) extinction coefficient is calculated by linearly regressing ln (FRLIGHT (z)) on depth z where the intercept is not constrained. FRLIGHT(z) = LIGHT(z) or DECK(z) where LIGHT(z) is light measured at depth z and DECK(z) is light measured on deck (above water) at the same time. For open water light profiles, the surface light measurement (depth z = 0) is excluded from the regression. For winter light profiles taken beneath the ice, the first light data are taken at the bottom of the ice cover and are included in the regression. The depth of uppermost light value is equal to the depth of the ice adjusted by the water level in the sample hole, i.e., the depth below the surface of the water. The water level can be at, above or below the surface of the ice. If the water level was not recorded, it is assumed to be 0.0 and the calculated light extinction coefficient is flagged. If ice thickness was not recorded, a light extinction coefficient is not calculated. For light data collected prior to March, 2007, light values less than 3.0 (micromolesPerMeterSquaredPerSec) are excluded. For light data collected starting in March 2007, light values less than 1.0 (micromolesPerMeterSquaredPerSec) are excluded. Except for bog lakes before August 1989, a light extinction coefficient is not calculated if there are less than three FRLIGHT values to be regressed. For bog lakes before August 1989, a light extinction coefficient is calculated if there are least two FRLIGHT values to be regressed. In these cases, the light extinction coefficient is flagged as non-standard. FRLIGHT values should be monotonically decreasing with depth. For light profiles where this is not true, a light extinction coefficient is not calculated. For samples for which light data at depth are present, but the corresponding deck light are missing, a light extinction coefficient is calculated by regressing ln (LIGHT (z)) on depth z. Note that if actual deck light had remained constant during the recording of the light profile, the resulting light extinction coefficient is the same as from regressing ln(FRLIGHT(z)). In these cases, the light extinction coefficient is flagged as non-standard. Oxygen and Temperature: We sample at the deepest part of the lake, taking a temperature and oxygen profile at meter intervals from the surface to within 1 meter of the bottom using a YSI Pro-ODO temporDO meter. We sample biweekly during open water and approximately every five weeks during ice cover. Protocol Log: Prior to 2011, we used a YSI Model 58 temporDO meter.
Short Name
NTLPH01
Version Number
27

Little Rock Lake Experiment at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Physical Limnology 1983 - 2000

Abstract
The Little Rock Acidification Experiment was a joint project involving the USEPA (Duluth Lab), University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, University of Wisconsin-Superior, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Little Rock Lake is a bi-lobed lake in Vilas County, Wisconsin, USA. In 1983 the lake was divided in half by an impermeable curtain and from 1984-1989 the northern basin of the lake was acidified with sulfuric acid in three two-year stages. The target pHs for 1984-5, 1986-7, and 1988-9 were 5.7, 5.2, and 4.7, respectively. Starting in 1990 the lake was allowed to recover naturally with the curtain still in place. Data were collected through 2000. The main objective was to understand the population, community, and ecosystem responses to whole-lake acidification. Funding for this project was provided by the USEPA and NSF. Parameters characterizing the physical limnology of the treatment (north basin, stations 1 and 3) and reference basin (south basin, station 2 and 4) are usually measured at one station in the deepest part of each basin (stations 1 and 2) at 0.5 to 1-m depth intervals depending on the parameter. Parameters measured at depth include water temperature, vertical penetration of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll and phaeopigments. Additional derived parameters include fraction of surface PAR at each depth and percent oxygen saturation. Auxiliary data include time of day, air temperature, cloud cover, and wind speed and direction and secchi depth. Sampling Frequency: varies - Number of sites: 4
Core Areas
Dataset ID
248
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Reading Temperature and Dissolved Oxygen1. Before leaving to sample a lake, check to make sure that there are no air bubbles under the probe membrane of the YSI TemperatureorDissolved Oxygen meter. If there are air bubbles or if it has been several months since changing the membrane (or if the instrument does not calibrate well or the oxygen readings wander), change the membrane as explained in the manual. Note: We have always used the Standard membranes. If adding water to new membrane fluid bottle (KCl), make sure to add Milli-Q water and not the CFL distilled water.2. Be sure to always store the probe in 100percent humidity surrounded by a wet sponge or paper towel.3. Turn on the temperatureordissolved oxygen meter at least 30 minutes before using it. It is best to turn it on before leaving to sample a lake as it uses up batteries slowly.4. Calibrate the meter using the chart on the back of the instrument (adjusted to the Madison altitude - 97percent oxygen saturation). Leave the plastic cap on the probe (at 100percent humidity). The temperature should not be changing during the calibration. Zero the instrument. When the temperature equilibrates, adjust the oxygen to correspond to the chart. After calibrating the instrument, switch the knob to percent oxygen saturation to make sure it is close to 97percent.5. Take readings at 1 meter intervals making sure to gently jiggle the cord when taking the oxygen readings (to avoid oxygen depletion). Jiggling the cord is not necessary if using a cable with a stirrer. Take half meter readings in the metalimnion (when temperature andoror oxygen readings exhibit a greater change with depth). A change of temperature greater than 1degreeC warrants half-meter intervals.6. Record the bottom depth using the markings on the temp.oroxygen meter cord and take a temperature and dissolved oxygen reading with the probe lying on the lake bottom. Dont forget to jiggle the probe to remove any sediment.7. If any readings seem suspicious, check them again when bringing the probe back up to the surface. You can also double check the calibration after bringing the probe out of the water (and putting the cap back on). Light (PAR) extinction coefficient is calculated by linearly regressing ln (FRLIGHT (z)) on depth z where the intercept is not constrained. FRLIGHT(z) = LIGHT(z) or DECK(z) where LIGHT(z) is light measured at depth z and DECK(z) is light measured on deck (above water) at the same time.For open water light profiles, the surface light measurement (depth z = 0) is excluded from the regression.For winter light profiles taken beneath the ice, the first light data are taken at the bottom of the ice cover and are included in the regression. The depth of uppermost light value is equal to the depth of the ice adjusted by the water level in the sample hole, i.e., the depth below the surface of the water. The water level can be at, above or below the surface of the ice. If the water level was not recorded, it is assumed to be 0.0 and the calculated light extinction coefficient is flagged. If ice thickness was not recorded, a light extinction coefficient is not calculated.For light data collected prior to March, 2007, light values less than 3.0 (micromolesPerMeterSquaredPerSec) are excluded. For light data collected starting in March 2007, light values less than 1.0 (micromolesPerMeterSquaredPerSec) are excluded. Except for bog lakes before August 1989, a light extinction coefficient is not calculated if there are less than three FRLIGHT values to be regressed. For bog lakes before August 1989, a light extinction coefficient is calculated if there are least two FRLIGHT values to be regressed. In these cases, the light extinction coefficient is flagged as non-standard.FRLIGHT values should be monotonically decreasing with depth. For light profiles where this is not true, a light extinction coefficient is not calculated.For samples for which light data at depth are present, but the corresponding deck light are missing, a light extinction coefficient is calculated by regressing ln (LIGHT (z)) on depth z. Note that if actual deck light had remained constant during the recording of the light profile, the resulting light extinction coefficient is the same as from regressing ln(FRLIGHT(z)). In these cases, the light extinction coefficient is flagged as non-standard.
Short Name
LRPHYS1
Version Number
4
Subscribe to percent oxygen saturation