US Long-Term Ecological Research Network

Cascade Project at North Temperate Lakes LTER: Nutrients 1991 - 2007

Abstract
Physical and chemical variables are measured at one central station near the deepest point of each lake. In most cases these measurements are made in the morning (0800 to 0900). Vertical profiles are taken at varied depth intervals. Chemical measurements are sometimes made in a pooled mixed layer sample (PML); sometimes in the epilimnion, metalimnion, and hypolimnion; and sometimes in vertical profiles. In the latter case, depths for sampling usually correspond to the surface plus depths of 50percent, 25percent, 10percent, 5percent and 1percent of surface irradiance.The 1991-1999 chemistry data obtained from the Lachat auto-analyzer. Like the process data, there are up to seven samples per sampling date due to Van Dorn collections across a depth interval according to percent irradiance. Voichick and LeBouton (1994) describe the autoanalyzer procedures in detail.Nutrient samples were sent to the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies for analysis beginning in 2000. The Kjeldahl method for measuring nitrogen is not used at IES, and so measurements reported from 2000 onwards are Total Nitrogen.
Core Areas
Dataset ID
78
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Methods for 1984-1990 were described by Carpenter and Kitchell (1993) and methods for 1991-1997 were described by Carpenter et al. (2001).Carpenter, S.R. and J.F. Kitchell (eds.). 1993. The Trophic Cascade in Lakes. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England.Carpenter, S.R., J.J. Cole, J.R. Hodgson, J.F. Kitchell, M.L. Pace,D. Bade, K.L. Cottingham, T.E. Essington, J.N. Houser and D.E. Schindler. 2001. Trophic cascades, nutrients and lake productivity: whole-lake experiments. Ecological Monographs 71: 163-186.Additional methods are described in the Cascade Methods manual, which can be found here:http://c13.valuemembers.net/Pages/methods_09.html
Short Name
CPHYS3
Version Number
4

Biocomplexity at North Temperate Lakes LTER; Coordinated Field Studies: Chemical Limnology 2001 - 2004

Abstract
Chemical Limnology data collected for Biocomplexity Project; Landscape Context - Coordinated Field Studies Replicate chemical samples were pumped from the surface water (0.5m depth) and secchi depth was recorded at each lake. Temperature/dissolved oxygen profiles were taken throughout the water column at one meter intervals on all lakes. For more detail see the Water Sampling Protocol. Sampling Frequency: During 2001, temperature/dissolved oxygen profiles and secchi depths were taken twice during the stratified summer period. Chemistry samples were only taken once during the 2001 stratified period. From 2002 through 2004, all chemical and physical water samples were taken once during June (or resampled during the stratified period if June samples were bad). All lakes in which color, DIC/DOC, and chlorophyll samples were taken in 2001 were resampled in 2002 due to error in collection and/or analysis. Number of sites: 62 Vilas County lakes were sampled from 2001-2004 (approximately 15 different lakes each year).
Dataset ID
41
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Environmental Sampling and Analysis: Physical, chemical and biological samples were taken above the deepest point in each lake during the summer stratification period (June, July, or August). Water samples were collected from one half meter depth using a peristaltic pump, and were analyzed for pH, alkalinity, specific conductance, water color, chlorophyll-a, dissolved organic and inorganic carbon, total phosphorus, and total nitrogen (Appendix Table 1). Secchi depth, temperature and dissolved oxygen profiles, and vertical plankton tows were also taken at the deepest point. Temperature and dissolved oxygen concentrations (DO) were measured through the water column at 1 meter increments.. Conductivity, TP-TN, alkalinity and pH water samples were collected unfiltered while water for DIC-DOC and color water samples was filtered through nucleopore polycarbonate filters. Alkalinity, pH, and DIC-DOC samples were filled to the top and sealed quickly to prevent CO2 loss or invasion. Samples containing air bubbles were recollected. Chlorophyll samples were collected on glass fiber filters in the field. Water chemistry and chlorophyll a analyses were done at the Trout Lake Biological Station, Boulder Junction, WI except for TP, TN, DIC and DOC samples, which were analyzed at the Center for Limnology-Lake Mendota Laboratory, Madison, WI.
NTL Keyword
Short Name
BIOCHEM1
Version Number
7

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Patterns of Soil Phosphorus - Y Plot Analysis 2001

Abstract
In natural soils, patterns of variance are generated by driving forces such as parent materials, climate, hydrology, relief, disturbance and biological activity. These drivers, operating at particular scales and interacting with other drivers across scales, create a complex pattern of soil variability. Human activity may change the natural patterns of variance by changing the scale at which the governing processes are operating or the governing processes that are dominant at a given scale. In the case of soils and phosphorus (P) concentrations, this may involve changing dominant forces from plant-soil interactions and parent material to fertilizer inputs. Here, we examine the hypothesis that human activity changes natural patterns of variance in soil P concentrations across several spatial scales. We measured soil P concentrations and variability at 3 distinct levels of analysis - among sites, within a field, and within a 10-m diameter plot - and across 4 management regimes - remnant prairie, lawns, cash grain farms, and dairies. Variance changed across scale in any one management regime and across management regimes at the same scale. Rescaling the pattern of P accumulation and variability has implications for managing P runoff from uplands. For sample sites on private property, specific site location information, such as GPS coordinates, is not included in these datasets. If you have a need for this information, please get in touch with the contact person listed above Number of sites: 30
Core Areas
Dataset ID
103
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Each core was analyzed for extractable phosphorusconcentration (Bray-1 method) at the University ofWisconsin Soil and Plant Analysis Lab. Bray-1, ameasure of extractable P, is a commonly usedmeasure of plant availability of phosphorus inagricultural systems. Although these extractionswere generally developed to estimate plant availableP and not to reflect P storage in the soil or P runoff, arelationship between extractable soil P concentrationsand dissolved P runoff has been noted in somesystems (Sharpley et al. 1993; Sharpley 1995).Bennett EM, Carpenter S, Clayton MK. 2004. Soil phosphorus variability: scale-dependency in an urbanizing agricultural landscape. Landscape Ecology. 20:389-400
Short Name
SOILPY
Version Number
18

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Patterns of Soil Phosphorus Across an Urbanizing Agricultural Landscape 2000 - 2001

Abstract
Understanding the magnitude and location of soil phosphorus (P) accumulation in watersheds is a critical step toward managing runoff of this pollutant to aquatic ecosystems. Here, we examined the usefulness of urban-rural gradients (URGs), an emerging paradigm in urban ecology, for predicting soil P concentrations across a rapidly urbanizing agricultural watershed in southern Wisconsin. We compared several measures of an urban-rural gradient to predictors of soil P such as soil type, slope, topography, land use, land cover, and fertilizer and manure use. Most of the factors that were expected to drive differences in soil P concentrations were not found to be good predictors of soil P; while there were several significant relationships, most explained only a small proportion of the variation. There was a significant relationship between soil P concentration and each of the urban-rural gradients, but these relationships explained only a small amount of the variation in soil P concentrations. Soil P concentration, unlike some other ecosystem properties, is not well predicted by urban-rural gradients Additional Chemical Analyses: These additional analyses were done to provide comparisons to Bray-1 P. Specifically, we wanted to know whether, in Dane County, there was a consistent relationship between total P and Bray-1 P. For sample sites on private property, specific site location information, such as GPS coordinates, is not included in these datasets. If you have a need for this information, please get in touch with the contact person listed above Number of sites: 334; 20 of these sites with additional chem analyses
Core Areas
Dataset ID
105
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
A combination map, consisting of the information in both the population density map and the modified-distance map, was also created (Figure 2c). This map is simply based on a grid cell by grid cell multiplication of the reclassified values from the population density and the modified distance map. In this paper, I will refer to this map as the combination map.Data points for measuring soil P and associated factors were stratified by zone and randomly located within each zone according to the combination map—with approximately 70 data points per zone. Location and address of each point were determined using the Madison and Dane County parcel GIS layers. Permission was requested from landowners to take a soil sample, and the precise location of the sample on the property was determined using standard randomizing techniques. If permission was denied (2 cases out of 330) or if there was no one present at the location, a coin toss was used to determine movement one parcel to the right or to the left along the same road. Landowners were also asked about their fertilizer use practices, manure use, dog ownership, and the date the house was built, if known.Approximately 400 soil samples were taken in the top soil horizon to a depth of 13.5 cm with a standard soil corer (diameter = approximately 1.6 cm). This depth was always within the surface horizon and any grass thatch was removed from lawn samples. Other data collected include percent slope, convex or concave nature of the slope, land use, land-cover type, and percent vegetative cover. The visually perceived zone was also recorded. The visually perceived zone was determined by visual inspection using a predetermined set of definitions of each zone. For example, urban sites were those with the highest housing density or some industrial use; suburban sites were those of moderate housing density and residential character; suburban fringe were newer residential developments of low housing density and larger houses; agricultural fringe were older residential developments of low density; and agricultural were those areas that were actively farmed. A handheld global positioning device was used to determine the precise (± 1 m) location of the soil sample.Soil samples were stored for no more than 3 weeks at room temperature before analysis. They were then dried for 15–24 hours at 50–55degreeC and sieved (1.8-mm mesh). Soil samples were then analyzed for Bray-1 P at the University of Wisconsin Soil and Plant Analysis Lab. Bray-1, a measure of extractable P, is a commonly used measure of phosphorus available to plants in agricultural systems. While relationships between extractable soil P and dissolved P in runoff have been noted in some systems (Sharpley and others 1993, Sharpley 1995), these extractions were generally developed to estimate plant available P, not to reflect P storage in the soil or P runoff. Therefore, we tested a subset (60) of our samples for total P, a better measure of P storage in soils. A regression of our samples indicates a reasonably close relationship between Bray-1 P and total P in our study area soils (Figure 3), indicating that our Bray-1 P results are probably a satisfactory estimate of both extractable P and the sorbed P that tends to accumulate in agricultural soils.
Short Name
SOILPVC
Version Number
17

Historical Birge - Juday Lake Survey 1900 - 1943

Abstract
Data collected by Birge, Juday, and collaborators, mostly in north-central Wisconsin, from 1900 through 1943; generally one sampling event per lake during the summer, but on some lakes, especially around Trout Lake Station, several sampling events for several successive years. This data set contains both surface data (depth of zero) and multi-depth data. Note that not all variables were measured on all lakes. Documentation: Johnson, M.D. (1984) Documentation and quality assurance of the computer files of historical water chemistry data from the Wisconsin Northern Highland Lake District (the Birge and Juday data).Wisconsin DNR Technical Report. Note: Values of -99999 in water quality data indicate trace amount of parameter was present. Number of sites: 663 (generally one sampling point per lake; occasionally, several sampling points per lake on multibasin, large lakes).<u> Note:</u> This data set was updated in 2013 to include multi-depth and additional surface data for a large subset of lakes. These additions expanded the number of sites from 605 to 663, and expanded the date range from 1925-1942 to 1900-1943 . Furthermore, 14 lakes in Minnesota were added to the data set contributing additional surface and multi-depth data. Another dataset was added in 2013 collected by Wisconsin limnologists Chauncey Juday and Edward Birge, this data set contains variables that are still commonly used in research. For example, temperature, dissolved carbon dioxide, color, pH, secchi disk, plankton, and silica. However, the data set also includes variables that are not commonly used, for example, crude protein, non-amino nitrogen, ether extract, and total organic and inorganic material. These data are characteristic of water chemistry analysis from the time in which they were compiled (5/31/1915 - 8/29/1938). The data set features data from 586 different lakes, primarily lakes in the Northern Highland Lakes District of Wisconsin. However, there is also data from lakes in southeastern and southcentral Wisconsin. Furthermore, there is a minimal amount of data from lakes in Minnesota, Ohio,New York, Alaska, the Philippines, and the United Kingdom. Documentation:Birge, E.A., and Juday, C. 1922. The inland lakes of Wisconsin. The Plankton I. Its quantity and chemical composition. Bulletin, Wis. Geol. and Nat. Hist. Survey No. 64: (Scientific series 13), ix-222.
Core Areas
Dataset ID
106
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Johnson, M.D. (1984) Documentation and quality assurance of the computer files of historical water chemistry data from the Wisconsin Northern Highland Lake District (the Birge and Juday data).Wisconsin DNR Technical Report.Methods not included in Johnson (1984):Nitrite Nitrogen- Sulphanilic acid procedure. Standard methods for the examination of water and sewage, Pub. Health Assn., New York, 5th edition, 1923, 13. Other Documentation: Domogalla, B.P., Juday, C., and Peterson, W.H. 1925. The forms of nitrogen found in certain lake waters. Jour. Biol. Chem. 63: 269-285.Ferric Ion- First calculated by subtracting ferrous ion from total iron measurements. Standard methods of water analysis. 1936. Amer. Pub. Health Assoc. P. 309. New York. Procedure was modified to determine ferric ion by acidifying samples by adding 1 milliliter of 3 N HCL to 50mL of lake water. With the iron samples in readiness, add 5 ml of the thiocyanate solution to the sample and to the standards, mix and compare immediately. (Standard Methods, Amer. Public Health Assoc. 8th ed., p. 75, 1936). Other documentation: Domogalla, B.P., Juday, C., and Peterson, W.H. 1925. The forms of nitrogen found in certain lake waters. Jour. Biol. Chem. 63: 269-285.Ferrous Ion- First calculated by ferricyanide method. Procedure was modified to determine ferrous ion by subtracting ferric ion from total iron. Documentation: Domogalla, B.P., Juday, C., and Peterson, W.H. 1925. The forms of nitrogen found in certain lake waters. Jour. Biol. Chem. 63: 269-285.Manganese- Determined by the persulfate method using the procedure described in Standard Methods of Water Analysis, Amer. Public Health Assoc., p. 84, 1936.Chlorophyll-a- A photometric method was used, in which the color of the light was confined to the wave-length 6200-6800 A which are absorbed by chlorophyll. Water samples of 5 to 15 liters (18 liters in the case of very low plankton content) were taken from different depths by using a hand operated vacuum pump), the water was the centrifuged at 25,000 rpm (for about 30 minutes). Residue was then washed with 98percent acetone, and CaCO3 was added to neutralize organic acids. This residue-acetone mixture was ground to extract the chlorophyll. The acetone extract was then filtered through filter paper into a flask, the residue being thoroughly washed with pure acetone. The light absorption of the extract was then measured. Procedure was carried out in a single day, under minimal light. Documentation: Kemmerer, G.I., and Hallett, L.T. 1938. Amount and distribution of the chlorophyll in some lakes of northeastern Wisconsin. Trans. Wisconsin Acad. Sci. 31: 411-438.Phosphate- Ceruleomolybdic method employed. Documentation: Juday, C., Birge, E.A., Kemmerer, G.I., Robinson, R.J. 1927. Phosphorus content of lake waters of northeastern Wisconsin. Trans. Wisconsin. Acad. Sci. 23: 233-248. Other Documentation: Robinson, R.J., Kemmerer, G.I. 1930. Determination of organic phosphorus in lake waters. Trans. Wisconsin. Acad. Sci. 25: 117-121.Redox Potential- Determined in situ on a given sampling date by use of a bright platinum electrode. Eh readings were made in millivolts. Documentation: Allgeier, R.J., Hafford, B.C., and Juday, C. 1941. Oxidation-reduction potentials and pH of lake waters and lake sediments. Trans. Wisconsin Acad. Sci. 33: 115-133.Note: The methodology used to determine copper, alumnium, boron, and hydrogen sulfide could not be determined.
Short Name
RGBIJD
Version Number
18
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