US Long-Term Ecological Research Network

Lake Mendota Multiparameter Sonde Profiles: 2017 - current

Abstract
Intermittent sensor profiling at the deep hole of Lake Mendota began in 2017 with a YSI EXO2 multiparameter sonde. Parameters include water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, phycocyanin, turbidity, and fDOM. Profiles are nominally 0 - 20 meters in depth in one meter increments, although the depth range and increments vary.

Core Areas
Dataset ID
400
Date Range
-
Instrumentation
YSI EXO2 Sonde
Publication Date
Version Number
1

Spatially Distributed Lake Mendota EXO Multi-Parameter Sonde Measurements Summer 2019

Abstract
This data was collected over 9 sampling trips from June to August 2019. 35 grid boxes were generated over Lake Mendota. Before each sampling effort, sample point locations were randomized within each grid box. Surface measurements were taken with an EXO multi-parameter sonde at the 35 locations throughout Lake Mendota during each sampling trip. Measurements include temperature, conductivity, chlorophyll, phycocyanin, turbidity, dissolved organic material, ODO, pH, and pressure.
Core Areas
Dataset ID
388
Date Range
-
Maintenance
ongoing
Methods
Conducted weekly data sampling (9 boat trips in June-August 2019) using an EXO multi-parameter sonde to collect temperature, conductivity, chlorophyll (ug/L), phycocyanin (ug/L), turbidity, dissolved organic material, ODO, pH, and pressure at 35 locations based on GPS guided stratified random sampling. 35 grid boxes were generated over Lake Mendota using qGIS. Point locations within each grid box were randomized before each sampling effort. At each point, variables were recorded continuously with the EXO sonde for a two-minute period. Continuous data was overaged over the two-minute period for each sample point.
Publication Date
Version Number
1

Cascade project at North Temperate Lakes LTER - High-resolution spatial analysis of CASCADE lakes during experimental nutrient enrichment 2015 - 2016

Abstract
This dataset contains high-resolution spatio-temporal water quality data from two experimental lakes during a whole-ecosystem experiment. Through gradual nutrient addition, we induced a cyanobacteria bloom in an experimental lake (Peter Lake) while leaving a nearby reference lake (Paul Lake) as a control. Peter and Paul Lakes (Gogebic county, MI USA), were sampled using the FLAMe platform (Crawford et al. 2015) multiple times during the summers of 2015 and 2016. In 2015 nutrient additions to Peter Lake began on 1 June, and ceased on 29 June, Paul Lake was left unmanipulated. In 2016 no nutrients were added to either lake. Measurements were taken using a YSI EXO2 probe and a Garmin echoMap 50s. Sensor- data were collected continuously at 1 Hz and linked via timestamp to create spatially explicit data for each lake.

Crawford, J. T., L. C. Loken, N. J. Casson, C. Smith, A. G. Stone, and L. A. Winslow. 2015. High-speed limnology: Using advanced sensors to investigate spatial variability in biogeochemistry and hydrology. Environmental Science & Technology 49:442–450.
Contact
Dataset ID
343
Date Range
-
Maintenance
complete
Methods
In two consecutive years, we measured lake-wide spatial patterning of cyanobacteria using the FLAMe platform (Crawford et al. 2015). To evaluate early warning indicators of a critical transition, in the first year we induced a cyanobacteria bloom through nutrient addition in an experimental lake while using a nearby unmanipulated lake as a reference ecosystem (Pace et al. 2017). During the second year, both lakes were left unmanipulated. Proposed detection methods for early warning indicators were compared between the manipulated and reference lakes to test for their ability to accurately detect statistical signals before the cyanobacteria bloom developed.
Peter and Paul Lakes are small, oligotrophic lakes (Peter: 2.5 ha, 6 m, 19.6 m and Paul: 1.7 ha, 3.9 m, 15 m, for surface area, mean, and max depth respectively) located in the Northern Highlands Lake District in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, USA (89°32’ W, 46°13’ N). These lakes have similar physical and chemical properties and are connected via a culvert with Paul Lake being upstream. Both lakes stratify soon after ice-off and remain stratified usually into November (for extensive lake descriptions, see Carpenter and Kitchell, 1993).
In the first year, Peter Lake was fertilized daily starting on 1 June 2015 (DOY 152) with a nutrient addition of 20 mg N m-2 d-1 and 3 mg P m-2 d-1 (molar N:P of 15:1) through the addition of H3PO4 and NH4NO3 until 29 June (day of year, DOY 180). The decision to stop nutrient additions required meeting four predefined criteria based on temporal changes in phycocyanin and chlorophyll concentrations indicative of early warning behavior of a critical transition to a persistent cyanobacteria bloom state. (Pace et al. 2017). Nutrients uniformly mix within 1-2 days after fertilization based on prior studies (Cole and Pace 1998). No nutrient additions were made to Paul Lake. In the second year (2016), neither lake received nutrient additions.
We mapped the surface water characteristics of both experimental lakes to identify changes in the spatial dynamics of cyanobacteria. In 2015, mapping occurred weekly from 4 June to 15 August (11 sample weeks). In 2016, when neither lake was fertilized, the lakes were mapped three times in early to mid-summer. In both years, mapping occurred between the hours of 07:00 to 12:00 (before the daily nutrient addition). We rotated the order that we sampled the lakes to avoid potential biases due to differences in time of day. Each individual lake sampling event was completed in approximately one hour.
The FLAMe platform maps the spatial pattern of water characteristics. A boat-mounted sampling system continuously pumps surface water from the lake to a series of sensors while geo-referencing each measurement (complete description of the FLAMe platform in Crawford et al. 2015). For this study, the FLAMe was mounted on a small flat-bottomed boat propelled by an electric motor and was outfitted with a YSI EXO2™ multi-parameter sonde (YSI, Yellow Springs, OH, USA). We focused for this study on measures of phycocyanin (a pigment unique to cyanobacteria) and temperature. Phycocyanin florescence was measured using the optical EXO™ Total Algae PC Smart Sensor. The Total Algae PC Smart Sensor was calibrated with a rhodamine solution based on the manufacturer’s recommendations. Phycocyanin concentrations are reported as ug/L; however, these concentrations should be considered as relative because we did not calibrate the sensor to actual phycocyanin nor blue-green algae concentrations. Geographic positions were measured using a Garmin echoMAP™ 50s. Sensor- data were collected continuously at 1 Hz and linked via timestamp to create spatially explicit data for each lake. Each sampling produced approximately 3500 measurements in the manipulated lake and 2000 in the reference lake. The measurements were distributed by following a gridded pattern across the entire lake surface to characterize spatial patterns over the extent of the lake.
Version Number
15

Trout Lake USGS Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) Stream Data 1975-current

Abstract
This data was collected by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) for the Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budget Project. The data set is primarily composed of water chemistry variables, and was collected from four USGS stream gauge stations in the Northern Highland Lake District of Wisconsin, near Trout Lake. The four USGS stream gauge stations are Allequash Creek at County Highway M (USGS-05357215), Stevenson Creek at County Highway M (USGS-05357225), North Creek at Trout Lake (USGS-05357230), and the Trout River at Trout Lake (USGS-05357245), all near Boulder Junction, Wisconsin. The project has collected stream water chemistry data for a maximum of 36 different chemical parameters,. and three different physical stream parameters: temperature, discharge, and gauge height. All water chemistry samples are collected as grab samples and sent to the USGS National Water Quality Lab in Denver, Colorado. There is historic data for Stevenson Creek from 1975-1977, and then beginning again in 1991. The Trout Lake WEBB project began during the summer of 1991 and sampling of all four sites continues to date.
Creator
Dataset ID
276
Date Range
-
Maintenance
Completed.
Metadata Provider
Methods
DL is used to represent “detection limit” where known.NOTE (1): Each method listed below corresponds with a USGS Parameter Code, which is listed after the variable name. NOTE (2): If the NEMI method # is known, it is also specified at the end of each method description.NOTE (3): Some of the variables are calculated using algorithms within QWDATA. If this is the case see Appendix D of the NWIS User’s Manual for additional information. However, appendix D does not list the algorithm used by the USGS. If a variable is calculated with an algorithm the term: algor, will be listed after the variable name.anc: 99431, Alkalinity is determined in the field by using the gran function plot methods, see TWRI Book 9 Chapter A6.1. anc_1: 90410 and 00410, Alkalinity is determined by titrating the water sample with a standard solution of a strong acid. The end point of the titration is selected as pH 4.5. See USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 57, NEMI method #: I-2030-89.2. c13_c12_ratio: 82081, Exact method unknown. The following method is suspected: Automated dual inlet isotope ratio analysis with sample preparation by precipitation with ammoniacal strontium chloride solution, filtration, purification, acidified of strontium carbonate; sample size is greater than 25 micromoles of carbon; one-sigma uncertainty is approximately ± 0.1 ‰. See USGS Determination of the delta13 C of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon in Water, RSIL Lab Code 1710. Chapter 18 of Section C, Stable Isotope-Ratio Methods Book 10, Methods of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory.3. ca, mg, mn, na, and sr all share the same method. The USGS parameter codes are listed first, then the method description with NEMI method #, and finally DL’s:ca- 00915, mg- 00925, mn- 01056, na- 00930, sr- 01080All metals are determined simultaneously on a single sample by a direct reading emission spectrometric method using an inductively coupled argon plasma as an excitation source. Samples are pumped into a crossflow pneumatic nebulizer, and introduced into the plasma through a spray chamber and torch assembly. Each analysis is determined on the basis of the average of three replicate integrations, each of which is background corrected by a spectrum shifting technique except for lithium (670.7 nm) and sodium (589.0 nm). A series of five mixed-element standards and a blank are used for calibration. Method requires an autosampler and emission spectrometry system. See USGS OF 93-125, p 101, NEMI Method #: I-1472-87.DL’s: ca- .02 mg/l, mg-.01 mg/l, mn-1.0 ug/l, na- .2 mg/l, sr- .5 ug/l4. cl, f, and so4 all share the same method. The USGS parameter codes are listed first, then the method description with NEMI method #, and finally DL’s:cl- 00940, f-00950, so4-00945All three anions (chloride, flouride, and sulfate) are separated chromatographically following a single sample injection on an ion exchange column. Ions are separated on the basis of their affinity for the exchange sites of the resin. The separated anions in their acid form are measured using an electrical conductivity cell. Anions are identified on the basis of their retention times compared with known standards. 19 The peak height or area is measured and compared with an analytical curve generated from known standards to quantify the results. See USGS OF 93-125, p 19, NEMI method #: I-2057.DL’s: cl-.2 mg/l, f-.1 mg/l, so4-.2 mg/lco2: 00405, algor, see NWIS User's Manual, QW System, Appendix D, Page 285.co3: 00445, algor.color: 00080, The color of the water is compared to that of the colored glass disks that have been calibrated to correspond to the platinum-cobalt scale of Hazen (1892), See USGS TWRI 5-A1 or1989, P.191, NEMI Method #: I-1250. DL: 1 Pt-Co colorconductance_field: 00094 and 00095, specific conductance is determined in the field using a standard YSI multimeter, See USGS TWRI 9, 6.3.3.A, P. 13, NEMI method #: NFM 6.3.3.A-SW.conductance_lab: 90095, specific conductance is determined by using a wheat and one bridge in which a variable resistance is adjusted so that it is equal to the resistance of the unknown solution between platinized electrodes of a standardized conductivity cell, sample at 25 degrees celcius, See USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 461, NEMI method #: I-1780-85.dic: 00691, This test method can be used to make independent measurements of IC and TC and can also determine TOC as the difference of TC and IC. The basic steps of the procedure are as follows:(1) Removal of IC, if desired, by vacuum degassing;(2) Conversion of remaining inorganic carbon to CO<sub>2</sub> by action of acid in both channels and oxidation of total carbon to CO<sub>2</sub> by action of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in the TC channel. For further information, See ASTM Standards, NEMI method #: D6317. DL: n/adkn: 00623 and 99894, Organic nitrogen compounds are reduced to the ammonium ion by digestion with sulfuric acid in the presence of mercuric sulfate, which acts as a catalyst, and potassium sulfate. The ammonium ion produced by this digestion, as well as the ammonium ion originally present, is determined by reaction with sodium salicylate, sodium nitroprusside, and sodium hypochlorite in an alkaline medium. The resulting color is directly proportional to the concentration of ammonia present, see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 327, NEMI method #: 351.2. DL: .10 mg/Ldo: 0300, Dissolved oxygen is measured in the field with a standard YSI multimeter, NEMI Method #: NFM 6.2.1-Lum. DL: 1 mg/L.doc: 00681, The sample is acidified, purged to remove carbonates and bicarbonates, and the organic carbon is oxidized to carbon dioxide with persulfate, in the presence of an ultraviolet light. The carbon dioxide is measured by nondispersive infrared spectrometry, see USGS OF 92-480, NEMI Method #: O-1122-92. DL: .10 mg/L.don: 00607, algor, see NWIS User's Manual, QW System, Appendix D, page 291.dp: 00666 and 99893, All forms of phosphorus, including organic phosphorus, are converted to orthophosphate ions using reagents and reaction parameters identical to those used in the block digester procedure for determination of organic nitrogen plus ammonia, that is, sulfuric acid, potassium sulfate, and mercury (II) at a temperature of 370 deg, see USGS OF Report 92-146, or USGS TWRI 5-A1/1979, p 453, NEMI method #: I-2610-91. DL= .012 mg/L.fe: 01046, Iron is determined by atomic absorption spectrometry by direct aspiration of the sample solution into an air-acetylene flame, see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1985, NEMI method #: I-1381. DL= 10µg/L.h_ion: 00191, algor.h20_hardness: 00900, algor.h20_hardness_2: 00902, algor.hco3: 00440, algor.k: 00935, Potassium is determined by atomic absorption spectrometry by direct aspiration of the sample solution into an air-acetylene flame , see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 393, NEMI method #: I-1630-85. DL= .01 mg/L.n_mixed: 00600, algor.n_mixed_1: 00602, algor.n_mixed_2: 71887, algor.nh3_nh4: 00608, Ammonia reacts with salicylate and hypochlorite ions in the presence of ferricyanide ions to form the salicylic acid analog of indophenol blue (Reardon and others, 1966; Patton and Crouch, 1977; Harfmann and Crouch, 1989). The resulting color is directly proportional to the concentration of ammonia present, See USGS OF 93-125, p 125/1986 (mg/l as N), NEMI Method #: I-2525. DL= .01 mg/L.nh3_nh4_1: 71846, algor.nh3_nh4_2: 00610, same method as 00608, except see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 321. DL = .01 mg/L.nh3_nh4_3: 71845, algor.no2: 00613, Nitrite ion reacts with sulfanilamide under acidic conditions to form a diazo compound which then couples with N-1-naphthylethylenediamine dihydrochloride to form a red compound, the absorbance of which is measured colorimetrically, see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 343, NEMI method #: I-2540-90. DL= .01 mg/L.no2_2: 71856, algor.no3: 00618, Nitrate is determined sequentially with six other anions by ion-exchange chromatography, see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, P. 339, NEMI method #: I-2057. DL= .05 mg/L.no3_2: 71851, algor.no32: 00630, An acidified sodium chloride extraction procedure is used to extract nitrate and nitrite from samples of bottom material for this determination(Jackson, 1958). Nitrate is reduced to nitrite by cadmium metal. Imidazole is used to buffer the analytical stream. The sample stream then is treated with sulfanilamide to yield a diazo compound, which couples with N-lnaphthylethylenediamine dihydrochloride to form an azo dye, the absorbance of which is measured colorimetrically. Procedure is used to extract nitrate and nitrite from bottom material for this determination (Jackson, 1958), see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 351. DL= .1 mg/Lno32_2: 00631, same as description for no32, except see USGS OF 93-125, p 157. DL= .1 mg/L.o18_o16_ratio: 82085, Sample preparation by equilibration with carbon dioxide and automated analysis; sample size is 0.1 to 2.0 milliliters of water. For 2-mL samples, the 2-sigma uncertainties of oxygen isotopic measurement results are 0.2 ‰. This means that if the same sample were resubmitted for isotopic analysis, the newly measured value would lie within the uncertainty bounds 95 percent of the time. Water is extracted from soils and plants by distillation with toluene; recommended sample size is 1-5 ml water per analysis, see USGS Determination of the Determination of the delta (18 O or 16O) of Water, RSIL Lab Code 489.o2sat: Dissolved oxygen is measured in the field with a standard YSI multimeter, which also measures % oxygen saturation, NEMI Method #: NFM 6.2.1-Lum.ph_field: 00400, pH determined in situ, using a standard YSI multimeter, see USGS Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations, book 9, Chaps. A1-A9, Chap. A6.4 "pH," NEMI method # NFM 6.4.3.A-SW. DL= .01 pH.ph_lab: 00403, involves use of laboratory pH meter, see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 363, NEMI method #: I-1586.po4: 00660, algor, see NWIS User's Manual, QW System, Appendix D, Page 286.po4_2: 00671, see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, NEMI method #: I-2602. DL= .01 mg/L.s: 63719, cannot determine exact method used. USGS method code: 7704-34-9 is typically used to measure sulfur as a percentage, with an DL =.01 µg/L. It is known that the units for sulfur measurements in this data set are micrograms per liter.sar: 00931, algor, see NWIS User's Manual, QW System, Appendix D, Page 288.si: 00955, Silica reacts with molybdate reagent in acid media to form a yellow silicomolybdate complex. This complex is reduced by ascorbic acid to form the molybdate blue color. The silicomolybdate complex may form either as an alpha or beta polymorph or as a mixture of both. Because the two polymorphic forms have absorbance maxima at different wavelengths, the pH of the mixture is kept below 2.5, a condition that favors formation of the beta polymorph (Govett, 1961; Mullen and Riley, 1955; Strickland, 1952), see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 417, NEMI method #: I-2700-85. DL= .10 mg/L.spc: 00932, algor, see NWIS User's Manual, QW System, Appendix D, Page 289.tds: 70300 and 70301, A well-mixed sample is filtered through a standard glass fiber filter. The filtrate is evaporated and dried to constant weight at 180 deg C, see " Filterable Residue by Drying Oven," NEMI method #: 160.1, DL= 10 mg/l. Note: despite DL values occur in the data set that are less than 10 mg/l.tds_1: 70301, algor, see NWIS User's Manual, QW System, Appendix D, Page 289.tds_2: 70303, algor, see NWIS User's Manual, QW System, Appendix D, Page 290.tkn: 00625 and 99892, Block digester procedure for determination of organic nitrogen plus ammonia, that is, sulfuric acid, potassium sulfate, and Mercury (II) at a temperature of 370°C. See the USGS Open File Report 92-146 for further details. DL: .10 mg/L.toc: 00680, The sample is acidified, purged to remove carbonates and bicarbonates, and the organic carbon is oxidized to carbon dioxide with persulfate, in the presence of an ultraviolet light. The carbon dioxide is measured by nondispersive infrared spectrometry, see USGS TWRI 5-A3/1987, p 15, NEMI Method #: O-1122-92. DL=.10 mg/L.ton: 00605, algor, See NWIS User's Manual, QW System, Appendix D, page 286.tp: 00665 and 99891, This method may be used to analyze most water, wastewater, brines, and water-suspended sediment containing from 0.01 to 1.0 mg/L of phosphorus. Samples containing greater concentrations need to be diluted, see USGS TWRI 5-A1/1989, p 367, NEMI method #: I-4607. tp_2: 71886, algor.tpc: 00694, The basic steps of this test method are:1) Conversion of remaining IC to CO2 by action of acid, 2) Removal of IC, if desired, by vacuum degassing, 3) Split of flow into two streams to provide for separate IC and TC measurements, 4) Oxidation of TC to CO2 by action of acid-persulfate aided by ultraviolet (UV) radiation in the TC channel, 5) Detection of CO2 by passing each liquid stream over membranes that allow the specific passage of CO2 to high-purity water where change in conductivity is measured, and 6) Conversion of the conductivity detector signal to a display of carbon concentration in parts per million (ppm = mg/L) or parts per billion (ppb = ug/L). The IC channel reading is subtracted from the TC channel reading to give a TOC reading, see ASTM Standards, NEMI Method #: D5997. DL= .06 µg/L.tpn: 49570, A weighed amount of dried particulate (from water) or sediment is combusted at a high temperature using an elemental analyzer. The combustion products are passed over a copper reduction tube to covert nitrogen oxides to molecular nitrogen. Carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and water vapor are mixed at a known volume, temperature, and pressure. The concentrations of nitrogen and carbon are determined using a series of thermal conductivity detectors/traps, measuring in turn by difference hydrogen (as water vapor), carbon (as carbon dioxide), and nitrogen (as molecular nitrogen). Procedures also are provided to differentiate between organic and inorganic carbon, if desired, see USEPA Method 440, NEMI method #: 440. DL= .01 mg/L.
Short Name
TL-USGS-WEBB Data
Version Number
15

Wisconsin Lake Historical Limnological Parameters 1925 - 2009

Abstract
This dataset is a compilation of ten sources of data representing physical and chemical properties of 13,093 Wisconsin lakes. The goal was to compile a comprehensive resource of historical and more recent lake information which would be accessible by querying a single database. Due to the wide temporal extent (1925-2009), methods used for measuring lake parameters in this dataset have varied. A careful look at the available metadata and background information is recommended.Sampling Frequency: variesNumber of sites: 13,093
Contact
Dataset ID
263
Date Range
-
Maintenance
complete
Metadata Provider
Methods
1. Dataset: sr1 - Surface Water Resource Inventory (SWRI) Wisconsin. Temporal coverage: 1960-1980. Original description found in the preface of each Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) SWRI report, published by county.Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Original source of data is WDNR SWRI printed reports. An electronic version (MS Excel spreadsheet) of the data was available (the origin of this spreadsheet was unknown) and was used in preparation of this database. Some discrepancies observed between printed version and electronic version of the dataset: 1) in the printed reports, alkalinity is expressed either as methyl orange or methyl purple; varies from county to county. The electronic format does not contain any metadata or explanation regarding alkalinity. 2) in the printed reports, sometimes max depth provided, sometimes known depth, and sometimes Secchi depth- these values seem to have been transcribed as Secchi depth in the electronic dataset. 3) values of area, conductivity, alkalinity, and depth in electronic format have been rounded up from values in the books. 4) a field in the spreadsheet named "Cl" has no match in books and was not included in the final dataset. 5) color code was not defined in electronic format. It was deciphered and checked against a few lakes from different counties in the printed reports. Final color codes: 1 - Light brown. 2 - Medium brown. 3 - Dark brown. 4 - Clear. 5 - TurbidIssues specific to the electronic format: 13822 records originally. After eliminating all records without WBICs (Water Body Identification Code) or with duplicate WBICs, the dataset reduced to 12638 records with unique WBICs. Of these, 151 records (with area &gt;10 acres) had no or zero data for some chemical parameters. Checked these records using WDNR SWRI reports. Eliminated any record that couldn't be resolved using the books and WDNR WBICs file.. Most records contain both alkalinity and conductivity data, although some do not contain both parameters. Final dataset sr1 has 12383 records2. Dataset: sr2 - Pieter Johnson. Temporal coverage: not specified. Original description: Combination of WDNR Register of Waterbodies (ROW) file, Wisconsin Lakes Book (wilk), and SWRI. Selected lakes with areas &gt;= 10 acres, and lakes in at least 2 of the 3 datasets. Lakes with missing WBIC were not included. Lakes with missing surface area were not included.Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Received original dataset from Jake Vander Zanden (UW-Madison, Center Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Received original dataset from Jake Vander Zanden (UW-Madison, Center for Limnology). The dataset was used in the following publication: Johnson, P.T., J.D. Olden, M.J. Vander Zanden. 2008. Dam invaders: impoundments facilitate biological invasions in freshwaters. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 6:357-363. Original dataset contained 5213 records; . Eliminated 8 records without WBIC, legal (TRS) description, and no values for lake characteristics. Note: Many records are repeated from sr1 dataset. Final dataset sr2 has 5205 records.3. Dataset: sr3 - Biocomplexity Project. Temporal coverage: 2001-2004. Original description: Data Set Title: Biocomplexity; Coordinated Field Studies: Chemical Limnology. Investigators: Steve R. Carpenter, Jim Kitchell, Timothy K. Kratz, John J. Magnuson. Contact:NTL LTER Information Manager; Center for Limnology, 680 N Park St, Madison, WI, 53706-1492, USA;(phone) 608-262-2573;(fax) 608-265-2340;(email) infomgr@lter.limnology.wisc.edu; 62 Vilas County lakes were sampled from 2001-2004 (approximately 15 different lakes each year)Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Original dataset had 62 records. Replicate samples per lake averaged to single measurements. Two records represented a single lake (Little Rock, North and South basins); these were merged into one record. Final dataset sr3 has 61 records.4. Dataset: sr4 - Landscape Position Project. Temporal coverage: 1998. Original description: Data Set Title: Landscape Position Project: Chemical Limnology. Investigators: Ben Greenfield, Thomas Hrabik, Timothy K. Kratz, David Lewis, Amina Pollard, Karen Wilson. Contact: NTL LTER Information Manager; Center for Limnology, 680 N Park St, Madison, WI, 53706-1492, USA;(phone) 608-890-3446;(fax) 608-265-2340;(email) infomgr@lter.limnology.wisc.edu; Parameters characterizing the chemical limnology and spatial attributes of 51 lakes were surveyed as part of the Landscape Position Project.Data manipulation for incorporation into database: WBICs added. Ward Lake removed from data. Parameters values over multiple sampling events were averaged. Info regarding depth at which samples were taken was not retained. Final dataset sr4 has 50 records.5. Dataset: sr5 - Lillie and Mason. Temporal coverage: 1979. Original description: printed report WI DNR Technical Bulletin no.138. 1983. Limnological characteristics of Wisconsin LakesData manipulation for incorporation into database: Original file containing 667 records received from Paul Garrison (WDNR). 88 records lacked WBICs but 65 of these were assigned using WDNR lakes shapefile, matching names and areas of lakes. Final 23 records without WBICs were removed. Note: Since lake / impoundment classification doesn't seem to match Johnson's dataset (sr2), it was not included. Note from Richard Lathrop (WDNR): total P measurements are probably unreliable due to method used not being sensitive enough. Final dataset sr5 has 644 records.6.Dataset: sr6 - EPA- Eastern Lakes Survey (1984): Temporal coverage: 1984. Original description: Data Set Title: National Surface Water Survey: Eastern Lake Survey-Phase I. The Eastern Lake Survey-Phase I (ELS-I), conducted in the fall of 1984, was the first part of a long-term effort by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency known as the National Surface Water Survey. It was designed to synoptically quantify the acid-base status of surface waters in the United States in areas expected to exhibit low buffering capacity. The effort was in support of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). The survey involved a three-month field effort in which 1612 probability sample lakes and 186 special interest lakes in the northeast, southeast, and upper Midwest regions of the United States were sampled.Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Original dataset, downloaded from EPA website, has over 100 parameters. Only a small subset of interest was retained. Original documentation for full dataset available is available. Dataset includes 285 Wisconsin lakes. WBICs were assigned using geographic coordinates from dataset. WBIC for one lake could not be determined and was excluded.. Note regarding conductivity parameter: value represents calculated conductivity, as the sum of concentrations of each major cation and anion. It is not a parameter measured in the field or lab. Actual formula used to calculated conductivity was not discovered. Final dataset sr6 has 284 records7. Dataset: sr7 - Environmental Research Lab Duluth (ERLD). Temporal coverage: 1979-1982. Original description: ERLD Lake Survey. Contact(s): NTL LTER Information Manager; Center for Limnology, 680 N Park St, Madison, WI, 53706-1492, USA;(phone) 608-262-2573;(fax) 608-265-2340;(email) infomgr@lter.limnology.wisc.edu; Chemical survey of 832 lakes in Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin and Ontario conducted by ERL-Duluth and UMD between 1979 and 1982 for evaluation of trophic state and sensitivity to acid deposition Glass, G.E. and Sorenson, J.A. (1994) USEPA ERLD-UMD acid deposition gradient-susceptibility database. U.S. EPA Environmental Research Laboratory - Duluth and University of Minnesota at Duluth, MN.Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Dataset included 428 Wisconsin records for which WBICs were included. Note: Original dataset had several errors in WBIC assignment: 1179900 was assigned to three different water bodies; correct WBICs are: 1503000, 1502400, 1481100; also 1515800 changed to 1516000. Lake Clara had 5 different stations for most parameters sampled. First station that had values for all parameters was included in final dataset. Final dataset sr7 has 428 records.8. Dataset: sr8 - Birge-Juday Historical Dataset. Temporal coverage: 1925-1941. Original description: Birge-Juday Historical Lake Data. Investigator(s): Edward A. Birge, Chauncy Juday. Contact: NTL LTER Information Manager; Center for Limnology, 680 N Park St, Madison, WI, 53706-1492, USA;(phone) 608-262-2573;(fax) 608-265-2340;(email) infomgr@lter.limnology.wisc.edu; Data collected by Birge, Juday, and collaborators, mostly in north-central Wisconsin, from 1925 through 1941; generally one sample per lake during the summer, but on some lakes, especially around Trout Lake Station, samples were taken on several successive years. Note that not all variables were measured on all lakes (scarce data for nutrients and ions). Documentation: Johnson, M.D. (1984) Documentation and quality assurance of the computer files of historical water chemistry data from the Wisconsin Northern Highland Lake District (the Birge and Juday data).WDNR Technical Report. Number of sites: 608 (generally one sampling point per lake; occasionally, several sampling points per lake on multibasin, large lakes).Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Original dataset downloaded from UW-Madison, Center for Limnology LTER website. Values averaged for lakes with multiple samples. WBICs assigned to 577 lakes via GIS spatial join using site coordinates and WDNR lake shapefile. Note from Johnson, M.D. (1984): the units for alkalinity (fixed CO2) changed from cc/L to mg/L sometime between Aug 1926 and May 1927. 17 entries were originally cc/l. Thus there might be inconsistencies in the alkalinity data. Final dataset sr8 has 577 records.9. Dataset: sr9 - USGS National Water Inventory System (NWIS). Temporal coverage: 1969-2009. Original description: U.S. Geological Survey. This file contains selected water-quality data for stations in the National Water Information System water-quality database (http://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/). Explanation of codes found in this file are followed by the retrieved data. The data you have secured from the USGS NWIS Web database may include data that have not received Director's approval and as such are provisional and subject to revision. The data are released on the condition that neither the USGS nor the United States Government may be held liable for any damages resulting from its authorized or unauthorized use.Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Data downloaded for 240 lakes for the following parameters: calcium, conductivity, alkalinity, pH. Original parameter codes (USGS NWIS schema): p00915 p00095 p00400 p00916 p29801 p39086 p90095. Data are averaged for multiple measurements. WBICs assigned via GIS spatial join using site coordinates and WDNR lake shapefile. Final dataset sr9 has 240 records.10. Dataset: sr10 - WI Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) Temporal coverage: 1969-2009 Original description: available at http://dnr.wi.gov/org/water/swims/Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Original data received from Jennifer Filbert (WDNR). Data were extracted from WDNR Surface Water Integrated Monitoring System (SWIMS) database (http://dnr.wi.gov/org/water/swims/). Lakes represented had one or more of the following parameters: Secchi depth, calcium, conductivity, alkalinity, pH, total P, turbidity,, chlorophyll a. Data were averaged where multiple measurements were available. Final dataset sr10 has 53 records.The Data Source data table contains a summary of the 10 data sources with information on temporal coverage and record counts. It also includes information on the availability of calcium and conductivity data from the data sources.
Short Name
WILIMN1
Version Number
25

North Temperate Lakes LTER: High Frequency CO2 and YSI AutoProfiler Data - Sparkling Bog North Buoy 2008

Abstract
The instrumented buoy on Sparkling Bog North is equipped with a CO2 monitor and a YSI AutoProfiler that measures several parameters including dissolved oxygen, water temperature, conductivity, pH, ORP, turbulence and chlorophyll-a. The buoy is also equipped with a thermistor chain and a D-OPTO dissolved oxygen sensor at depth .5 m as well as meteorological sensors that provide fundamental information on lake thermal structure, weather conditions, and lake metabolism. Data are usually collected either at 1 minute or 10 minute intervals. Sampling Frequency: varies for instantaneous sample. Generally 1 minute or 10 minutes. Number of sites: 1
Core Areas
Dataset ID
229
Date Range
-
Instrumentation
<p>YSI AutoProfiler</p>
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
see abstract for methods description.
Short Name
NSPBBUOY3
Version Number
19

EPA Eastern Lake Survey original data for the Upper Midwest Region 1984

Abstract
Overton, W. S., P. Kanciruk, L. A. Hook, J. M. Eilers, D. H. Landers, D. F. BRAKKE, R. A. Linthurst, and M. D. DeHaan. 1986. Characteristics of lakes in the Eastern United States. Vol. 2. Lakes sampled and descriptive statistics for physical and chemical variables. US EPA 600/4-86/007B. 369 p. The Eastern Lake Survey-Phase I (ELS-I), conducted in the fall of 1984, was the first part of a long-term effort by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency known as the National Surface Water Survey. It was designed to synoptically quantify the acid-base status of surface waters in the United States in areas expected to exhibit low buffering capacity. The effort was in support of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). The survey involved a three-month field effort in which 1612 probability sample lakes and 186 special interest lakes in the northeast, southeast, and upper midwest regions of the United States were sampled. This dataset includes data on 592 lakes in Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin. Number of sites: 592
Core Areas
Creator
Dataset ID
107
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
please see methods description in abstract
Short Name
RGELS
Version Number
4

Environmental Research Lab-Duluth Chemical Lake Survey 1979 - 1982

Abstract
Chemical survey of 832 lakes in Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin and Ontario conducted by ERL-Duluth and UMD between 1979 and 1982 for evaluation of trophic state and sensitivity to acid deposition Glass, G.E. and Sorenson, J.A. (1994) USEPA ERLD-UMD acid deposition gradient-susceptibility database. U.S. EPA Environmental Research Laboratory - Duluth and University of Minnesota at Duluth, MN. Number of sites: 856 within 832 lakes
Core Areas
Dataset ID
101
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Methods are published in Glass, G.E. and Sorenson, J.A. (1994) USEPA ERLD-UMD acid deposition gradient-susceptibility database. U.S. EPA Environmental Research Laboratory - Duluth and University of Minnesota at Duluth, MN.
Short Name
RGERLD
Version Number
6
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