US Long-Term Ecological Research Network

Lake Mendota water temperature secchi depth snow depth ice thickness and meterological conditions 1894 - 2007

Abstract
Data for water temperature at different depth and different frequencies assembled from various sources by Dale Roberson. A table with additional parameters collected at the same time is also provided for dates when available. These parameters are weather observations, secchi depth, snow and ice depths.
Dataset ID
335
Date Range
-
Methods
Data were assembled from different collectors, names are given in metadata. Measurements were conducted by hand.
NTL Keyword
Version Number
14

Satellite derived secchi disk depth and other lake and landscape characteristics in Wisconsin, USA, 1991 - 2012

Abstract
This data supports the following publication: Rose, K.C., S.R. Greb, M. Diebel, and M.G. Turner. Annual precipitation as a regulator of spatial and temporal drivers of lake water clarity. Ecological Applications. The data uses satellite remotely sensed estimates of Secchi disk depth (Landsat imagery), landscape features, and lake characteristics to understand how and why lakes vary and respond to different drivers through time and space. The data were produced by the authors and their collaborators, as acknowledged in the manuscript. The Secchi disk depth data span the time period 1991-2012.
Contact
Dataset ID
331
Date Range
-
Methods
The complete methods for this manuscript are described in the manuscript: Rose, K.C., S.R. Greb, M. Diebel, and M.G. Turner. Annual precipitation as a regulator of spatial and temporal drivers of lake water clarity. Ecological Applications.
NTL Keyword
Version Number
16

Geographically paired lake-reservoir dataset derived from the 2007 USA EPA National Lakes Assessment

Abstract
Climate change poses a significant threat to lake and reservoir ecosystems, though the exact nature of these threats may differ between lakes and reservoirs. To assess differences between lakes and reservoirs that may influence their response to climate change, we compared catchment and waterbody attributes of 132 geographically paired lakes and reservoirs from the 2007 United States Environmental Protection Agencys National Lakes Assessment (NLA) dataset. The data include the NLA IDs of each waterbody and their elevation, catchment area, surface area, perimeter, maximum depth, residence time, Secchi disk depth, surface temperature, and bottom temperature. Residence time data was collected from estimates generated by Brooks, J.R., J.J. Gibson, S.J. Birks, M.H. Weber, K.D. Rodecap, J.L. Stoddard. 2014. Stable isotope estimates of evaporation: inflow and water residence time for lakes across the United States as a tool for national lake water quality assessments. Limnology and Oceanography 59(6):2150-2165.
Contact
Dataset ID
326
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Methods
NLA data were obtained from US Environmental Protection Agency National Aquatic Resource Surveys website (https://www.epa.gov/national-aquatic-resource-surveys/data-national-aquatic-resource-surveys). We incorporated the NLAs definition of human-made lakes, lakes that did not exist prior to European settlement and resulted from impoundment, as reservoirs in our analysis. From this database, we identified geographically co-located lake and reservoir pairs. Pairs were defined as lakes and reservoirs within a 50 km radius of one another. We developed pairings using the near proximity analysis tool for Geographic Information Systems (ArcGIS 10.1). If more than one lake was found within 50 km of a reservoir, the closest lake was chosen for the analysis. We identified 66 lake-reservoir pairs and for each lake or reservoir, we consolidated its catchment and water body attributes from the NLA data onto our data spreadsheet.
Laboratory and field methods for the NLA data are reported by the US Environmental Protection Agency (https://www.epa.gov/national-aquatic-resource-surveys/national-lakes-assessment-2007-results). We used the NLA data directly to collect basic geographic and morphometric parameters (elevation, catchment area, lake area, lake perimeter, maximum depth) and physical parameters (Secchi disk depth, turbidity, chlorophyll, surface water temperature, bottom water temperature). Mean residence times were provided by Renée Brooks (pers. communication) and were estimated using stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen as described in Brooks et al. (2014). If more than one parameter was collected for a site, then the average among the values was used in the analysis. From these parameters, we also calculated the ratio of catchment area to surface area (CA:SA) and depth-corrected difference in temperature between the surface and bottom waters.
Version Number
11

Upper Midwest Great Lakes Region Citizen Secchi Data 1938 - 2012

Abstract
Upper MidwestorGreat Lakes Region Citiizen Secchi Data includes 239,741 citizen Secchi monitoring records (1938 – 2012) from Illinois Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program, Indiana Clean Lakes Program, Iowa Secchi Dip-In Project, Michigan Clean Water Corps, Lakes of Missouri Volunteer Program, Minnesota Citizen Lake Monitoring Program, Ohio Citizen Lake Awareness Program, and Wisconsin Citizen Lake Monitoring Records. Data were obtained from above monitoring groups and merged with the high resolution National Hydrography Dataset based on citizen proved latitudeorlongitude coordinates to verify the location of individual lakes and size of lake (hectare). Code used to estimate annual average Secchi depth (m) provided in metadata. These citizen-collected, publically available Secchi depth measurements were collected to answer two questions: (1) what are the long-term trends in lake water quality across a broad geographic region?; (2) how do trends differ as a function of spatial location, size of lake monitored, and when Secchi records were collected. Data collection and analysis were funded by the National Science Foundation (MSB- 1065786, EF-1065818, EF-1065649), NTL-LTER (DEB-0822700), STRIVE grant 2011-W-FS-7 from the Environmental Protection Agency. GLERL contribution number (1703).
Contact
Dataset ID
300
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
completed
Metadata Provider
Methods
Secchi monitoring records (1938 – 2012) were obtained from Illinois Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program, Indiana Clean Lakes Program, Iowa Secchi Dip-In Project, Michigan Clean Water Corps, Lakes of Missouri Volunteer Program, Minnesota Citizen Lake Monitoring Program, Ohio Citizen Lake Awareness Program, and Wisconsin Citizen Lake Monitoring Records. Data were obtained from above monitoring groups and merged with the high resolution National Hydrography Dataset (www.nhd.usgs.gov) based on citizen proved latitudeorlongitude coordinates to verify the location of individual lakes and size of lake (hectare). [R] code used to estimate annual average Secchi depth (m) provided in metadata.
NTL Keyword
Short Name
GLR Secchi
Version Number
17

LTREB Chemical and Physical Limnology at Lake Myvatn 2012-current

Abstract
These data are part of a long-term monitoring program at station 33 in the central part of Myvatn that represents the dominant habitat, with benthos consisting of diatomaceous ooze. The program was designed to characterize import benthis and pelagic variables across years as midge populations varied in abundance. Starting in 2012 samples were taken at roughly weekly inervals during June, July, and August, which corresponds to the summer generation of the dominant midge, Tanytarsus gracilentus.
Creator
Dataset ID
287
Date Range
-
Maintenance
Ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
Water Profile1. Take Light, DO, pH, Temp profile every 0.5mUse YSI DO probe, pH meter, and Li Cor light meter. Take the light profile from the sunny side of the boat.2. Take Secchi depthLower Secchi disk slowly until you can never see clear boundaries between white and black quarters, record this distance to the surface of the water as lower Secchi disk observation. Then pull the Secchi up until you can always see clear boundaries between white and black quarters, record this distance to the surface as the upper Secchi observation.Benthic Net Primary Production1. Measure light, temperature, percentDO, DO, and pH at 0.5m intervals at the sampling location.2. Take 10 clean/undisturbed cores. Try to get a uniform distance between the sediment and top of tube, so the cores have the same volume of water. Cover in boat with tarp to exclude light.3. Collect water from the shore of the boat and measure temp, percentDO, and DO. Save in bucket.4. Measure light intensity at 0 (out) and 0.5m depth where the cores will be incubated.5. Set up HOBO light recorder on the incubator.6. For each tube, take initial temp, percentDO, and DO. Before taking DO measurement, move the DO probe up and down three times to ensure no DO gradient (but do not disturb sediment). Add, slowly and without bubbling, 10 to 20mL of water (just the amount needed) to the core from bucket (number 3) to ensure no air space, and replace the stopper. Measure the distance from sediment to bottom of stopper to the nearest 0.5cm (column_depth).7. Place cores 1, 3, 5, and 7 in dark chambers (opaque tubes), so there are 4 dark and 6 light treatments.8. Incubate the cores using the metal structure at saturation light intensity if possible (300 mol per meter squared per second at 0.5m depth) for about 3h.9. Before taking DO measurement, move the DO probe up and down three times to ensure no DO gradient (but do not disturb sediment), and then measure percentDO, DO, and temperature in each core.Light controlsOnce a month (June, July, August), on a sunny day, incubate 10 cores for 3h with different light intensities to determine primary productivity under different light intensities and different temperatures. It would be best to do this the day after routine sampling (i.e., when retrieving the benthic sampler) so that the results can be compared to those from the routine sampling. Different light levels are obtained using white mesh bags around the core tubes.Core 1 and 6, lightCore 2 and 7, 2xCore 3 and 8, 4xCore 4 and 9, 8xCore 5 and 10, darkIMPORTANT: After the incubations, measure light intensity inside a core tube covered for the different treatments. This is done by removing the light meter from the metal holder and placing it facing up in a core using zip ties and a blue stopper at the bottom. Then place treatment bags over the top and measure light when holding the core at the level they reach in the incubator; use the marking on the light meter cord to make sure this is standardized for all measurements. This should be done 8 times total (each bag plus twice without bags).Light saturationOnce a month in the summer of 2013, we conducted sediment core incubations with varying amounts of shade cloth applied to the cores. Sediment cores received 0, 2, 4, 8, or 15 layers of shade cloth, with two cores in each treatment. All cores were then incubated in the lake over the same 3hr period at a depth of 0.5m.Sediment Dry Weight and Weight on Combustion1. Remove 0.75cm of sediment from a core into a plastic deli container. This should be done on a fresh core. This is the same sample that is used for chl analysis.2. Subsample 5 to 10mL sediment solution and place in a pre-weighed tin tray in oven at 60C for at least 12 hours. When dry, weigh for dry weight.In 2014, the method for sampling benthic chlorophyll changed. Sediment Dry Weight measurements were taken from these samples as well. Below is the pertinent section from the methods protocols. Processing after the collection of the sample was not changed.Take sediment samples from the 5 cores collected for sediment characteristics. Take 4 syringes of sediment with 10mL syringe (15.3 mm diameter). Take 4-5cm of sediment. Then, remove bottom 2cm and place top 2cm in the film canister.3. Combust at 550C for 4.5 hours. Weigh tray.4. If not analyzing combusted samples immediately, place in drying oven before weighing.
Version Number
15

Wisconsin Lake Historical Limnological Parameters 1925 - 2009

Abstract
This dataset is a compilation of ten sources of data representing physical and chemical properties of 13,093 Wisconsin lakes. The goal was to compile a comprehensive resource of historical and more recent lake information which would be accessible by querying a single database. Due to the wide temporal extent (1925-2009), methods used for measuring lake parameters in this dataset have varied. A careful look at the available metadata and background information is recommended.Sampling Frequency: variesNumber of sites: 13,093
Contact
Dataset ID
263
Date Range
-
Maintenance
complete
Metadata Provider
Methods
1. Dataset: sr1 - Surface Water Resource Inventory (SWRI) Wisconsin. Temporal coverage: 1960-1980. Original description found in the preface of each Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) SWRI report, published by county.Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Original source of data is WDNR SWRI printed reports. An electronic version (MS Excel spreadsheet) of the data was available (the origin of this spreadsheet was unknown) and was used in preparation of this database. Some discrepancies observed between printed version and electronic version of the dataset: 1) in the printed reports, alkalinity is expressed either as methyl orange or methyl purple; varies from county to county. The electronic format does not contain any metadata or explanation regarding alkalinity. 2) in the printed reports, sometimes max depth provided, sometimes known depth, and sometimes Secchi depth- these values seem to have been transcribed as Secchi depth in the electronic dataset. 3) values of area, conductivity, alkalinity, and depth in electronic format have been rounded up from values in the books. 4) a field in the spreadsheet named "Cl" has no match in books and was not included in the final dataset. 5) color code was not defined in electronic format. It was deciphered and checked against a few lakes from different counties in the printed reports. Final color codes: 1 - Light brown. 2 - Medium brown. 3 - Dark brown. 4 - Clear. 5 - TurbidIssues specific to the electronic format: 13822 records originally. After eliminating all records without WBICs (Water Body Identification Code) or with duplicate WBICs, the dataset reduced to 12638 records with unique WBICs. Of these, 151 records (with area >10 acres) had no or zero data for some chemical parameters. Checked these records using WDNR SWRI reports. Eliminated any record that couldn't be resolved using the books and WDNR WBICs file.. Most records contain both alkalinity and conductivity data, although some do not contain both parameters. Final dataset sr1 has 12383 records2. Dataset: sr2 - Pieter Johnson. Temporal coverage: not specified. Original description: Combination of WDNR Register of Waterbodies (ROW) file, Wisconsin Lakes Book (wilk), and SWRI. Selected lakes with areas >= 10 acres, and lakes in at least 2 of the 3 datasets. Lakes with missing WBIC were not included. Lakes with missing surface area were not included.Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Received original dataset from Jake Vander Zanden (UW-Madison, Center Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Received original dataset from Jake Vander Zanden (UW-Madison, Center for Limnology). The dataset was used in the following publication: Johnson, P.T., J.D. Olden, M.J. Vander Zanden. 2008. Dam invaders: impoundments facilitate biological invasions in freshwaters. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 6:357-363. Original dataset contained 5213 records; . Eliminated 8 records without WBIC, legal (TRS) description, and no values for lake characteristics. Note: Many records are repeated from sr1 dataset. Final dataset sr2 has 5205 records.3. Dataset: sr3 - Biocomplexity Project. Temporal coverage: 2001-2004. Original description: Data Set Title: Biocomplexity; Coordinated Field Studies: Chemical Limnology. Investigators: Steve R. Carpenter, Jim Kitchell, Timothy K. Kratz, John J. Magnuson. Contact:NTL LTER Information Manager; Center for Limnology, 680 N Park St, Madison, WI, 53706-1492, USA;(phone) 608-262-2573;(fax) 608-265-2340;(email) infomgr@lter.limnology.wisc.edu; 62 Vilas County lakes were sampled from 2001-2004 (approximately 15 different lakes each year)Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Original dataset had 62 records. Replicate samples per lake averaged to single measurements. Two records represented a single lake (Little Rock, North and South basins); these were merged into one record. Final dataset sr3 has 61 records.4. Dataset: sr4 - Landscape Position Project. Temporal coverage: 1998. Original description: Data Set Title: Landscape Position Project: Chemical Limnology. Investigators: Ben Greenfield, Thomas Hrabik, Timothy K. Kratz, David Lewis, Amina Pollard, Karen Wilson. Contact: NTL LTER Information Manager; Center for Limnology, 680 N Park St, Madison, WI, 53706-1492, USA;(phone) 608-890-3446;(fax) 608-265-2340;(email) infomgr@lter.limnology.wisc.edu; Parameters characterizing the chemical limnology and spatial attributes of 51 lakes were surveyed as part of the Landscape Position Project.Data manipulation for incorporation into database: WBICs added. Ward Lake removed from data. Parameters values over multiple sampling events were averaged. Info regarding depth at which samples were taken was not retained. Final dataset sr4 has 50 records.5. Dataset: sr5 - Lillie and Mason. Temporal coverage: 1979. Original description: printed report WI DNR Technical Bulletin no.138. 1983. Limnological characteristics of Wisconsin LakesData manipulation for incorporation into database: Original file containing 667 records received from Paul Garrison (WDNR). 88 records lacked WBICs but 65 of these were assigned using WDNR lakes shapefile, matching names and areas of lakes. Final 23 records without WBICs were removed. Note: Since lake / impoundment classification doesn't seem to match Johnson's dataset (sr2), it was not included. Note from Richard Lathrop (WDNR): total P measurements are probably unreliable due to method used not being sensitive enough. Final dataset sr5 has 644 records.6.Dataset: sr6 - EPA- Eastern Lakes Survey (1984): Temporal coverage: 1984. Original description: Data Set Title: National Surface Water Survey: Eastern Lake Survey-Phase I. The Eastern Lake Survey-Phase I (ELS-I), conducted in the fall of 1984, was the first part of a long-term effort by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency known as the National Surface Water Survey. It was designed to synoptically quantify the acid-base status of surface waters in the United States in areas expected to exhibit low buffering capacity. The effort was in support of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). The survey involved a three-month field effort in which 1612 probability sample lakes and 186 special interest lakes in the northeast, southeast, and upper Midwest regions of the United States were sampled.Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Original dataset, downloaded from EPA website, has over 100 parameters. Only a small subset of interest was retained. Original documentation for full dataset available is available. Dataset includes 285 Wisconsin lakes. WBICs were assigned using geographic coordinates from dataset. WBIC for one lake could not be determined and was excluded.. Note regarding conductivity parameter: value represents calculated conductivity, as the sum of concentrations of each major cation and anion. It is not a parameter measured in the field or lab. Actual formula used to calculated conductivity was not discovered. Final dataset sr6 has 284 records7. Dataset: sr7 - Environmental Research Lab Duluth (ERLD). Temporal coverage: 1979-1982. Original description: ERLD Lake Survey. Contact(s): NTL LTER Information Manager; Center for Limnology, 680 N Park St, Madison, WI, 53706-1492, USA;(phone) 608-262-2573;(fax) 608-265-2340;(email) infomgr@lter.limnology.wisc.edu; Chemical survey of 832 lakes in Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin and Ontario conducted by ERL-Duluth and UMD between 1979 and 1982 for evaluation of trophic state and sensitivity to acid deposition Glass, G.E. and Sorenson, J.A. (1994) USEPA ERLD-UMD acid deposition gradient-susceptibility database. U.S. EPA Environmental Research Laboratory - Duluth and University of Minnesota at Duluth, MN.Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Dataset included 428 Wisconsin records for which WBICs were included. Note: Original dataset had several errors in WBIC assignment: 1179900 was assigned to three different water bodies; correct WBICs are: 1503000, 1502400, 1481100; also 1515800 changed to 1516000. Lake Clara had 5 different stations for most parameters sampled. First station that had values for all parameters was included in final dataset. Final dataset sr7 has 428 records.8. Dataset: sr8 - Birge-Juday Historical Dataset. Temporal coverage: 1925-1941. Original description: Birge-Juday Historical Lake Data. Investigator(s): Edward A. Birge, Chauncy Juday. Contact: NTL LTER Information Manager; Center for Limnology, 680 N Park St, Madison, WI, 53706-1492, USA;(phone) 608-262-2573;(fax) 608-265-2340;(email) infomgr@lter.limnology.wisc.edu; Data collected by Birge, Juday, and collaborators, mostly in north-central Wisconsin, from 1925 through 1941; generally one sample per lake during the summer, but on some lakes, especially around Trout Lake Station, samples were taken on several successive years. Note that not all variables were measured on all lakes (scarce data for nutrients and ions). Documentation: Johnson, M.D. (1984) Documentation and quality assurance of the computer files of historical water chemistry data from the Wisconsin Northern Highland Lake District (the Birge and Juday data).WDNR Technical Report. Number of sites: 608 (generally one sampling point per lake; occasionally, several sampling points per lake on multibasin, large lakes).Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Original dataset downloaded from UW-Madison, Center for Limnology LTER website. Values averaged for lakes with multiple samples. WBICs assigned to 577 lakes via GIS spatial join using site coordinates and WDNR lake shapefile. Note from Johnson, M.D. (1984): the units for alkalinity (fixed CO2) changed from cc/L to mg/L sometime between Aug 1926 and May 1927. 17 entries were originally cc/l. Thus there might be inconsistencies in the alkalinity data. Final dataset sr8 has 577 records.9. Dataset: sr9 - USGS National Water Inventory System (NWIS). Temporal coverage: 1969-2009. Original description: U.S. Geological Survey. This file contains selected water-quality data for stations in the National Water Information System water-quality database (http://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/). Explanation of codes found in this file are followed by the retrieved data. The data you have secured from the USGS NWIS Web database may include data that have not received Director's approval and as such are provisional and subject to revision. The data are released on the condition that neither the USGS nor the United States Government may be held liable for any damages resulting from its authorized or unauthorized use.Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Data downloaded for 240 lakes for the following parameters: calcium, conductivity, alkalinity, pH. Original parameter codes (USGS NWIS schema): p00915 p00095 p00400 p00916 p29801 p39086 p90095. Data are averaged for multiple measurements. WBICs assigned via GIS spatial join using site coordinates and WDNR lake shapefile. Final dataset sr9 has 240 records.10. Dataset: sr10 - WI Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) Temporal coverage: 1969-2009 Original description: available at http://dnr.wi.gov/org/water/swims/Data manipulation for incorporation into database: Original data received from Jennifer Filbert (WDNR). Data were extracted from WDNR Surface Water Integrated Monitoring System (SWIMS) database (http://dnr.wi.gov/org/water/swims/). Lakes represented had one or more of the following parameters: Secchi depth, calcium, conductivity, alkalinity, pH, total P, turbidity,, chlorophyll a. Data were averaged where multiple measurements were available. Final dataset sr10 has 53 records.The Data Source data table contains a summary of the 10 data sources with information on temporal coverage and record counts. It also includes information on the availability of calcium and conductivity data from the data sources.
Short Name
WILIMN1
Version Number
25

South: Field Sampling Routine

A. Nutrient Sampling: Refer to the Field Sheet to see which bottles need to be sampled at which depths and the 'Southern Lakes LTER Bottle Codes’ for preservation, filtering, and coding information.
 
1.     Purge the lines: Whenever sampling from a new depth, the peristaltic pump tubing must be purged of the water from the previous depth. After reaching the proper sampling depth, use a graduated cylinder to measure the volume of water purged before beginning the sampling. Purge at least 1200 mL of water for each 20 meters of tu

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Secchi Disk Depth; Other Auxiliary Base Crew Sample Data 1981 - current

Abstract
Secchi disk depth is measured in the deepest part of each lake for the eleven primary lakes (Allequash, Big Muskellunge, Crystal, Sparkling, Trout lakes, unnamed lakes 27-02 [Crystal Bog] and 12-15 [Trout Bog], Fish, Mendota, Monona and Wingra). The disk is circular, 20 cm in diameter, and has alternating black and white quadrants. It is lowered using a calibrated Kevlar rope to minimize stretching. Readings are made on the shaded side of the boat both with and without the aid of a plexiglass viewer. The points at which the disk disappears while being lowered and reappears while being raised are averaged to determine Secchi depth. Auxiliary data include time of day, air temperature, cloud cover, wave height, wind speed and direction and whether the lake was ice covered on the sampledate. Sampling Frequency: fortnightly during ice-free season - every 6 weeks during ice-covered season for the northern lakes. The southern lakes are similar except that sampling occurs monthly during the fall and typically only once during the winter (depending on ice conditions). Number of sites: 11
Dataset ID
31
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Maintenance
ongoing
Metadata Provider
Methods
see abstract for secchi disc measurements. Otherwise, these are observations made by the crew while out sampling.
Short Name
NTLPH03
Version Number
29
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