US Long-Term Ecological Research Network

Spatially Distributed Lake Mendota EXO Multi-Parameter Sonde Measurements Summer 2019

Abstract
This data was collected over 9 sampling trips from June to August 2019. 35 grid boxes were generated over Lake Mendota. Before each sampling effort, sample point locations were randomized within each grid box. Surface measurements were taken with an EXO multi-parameter sonde at the 35 locations throughout Lake Mendota during each sampling trip. Measurements include temperature, conductivity, chlorophyll, phycocyanin, turbidity, dissolved organic material, ODO, pH, and pressure.
Core Areas
Dataset ID
388
Date Range
-
Maintenance
ongoing
Methods
Conducted weekly data sampling (9 boat trips in June-August 2019) using an EXO multi-parameter sonde to collect temperature, conductivity, chlorophyll (ug/L), phycocyanin (ug/L), turbidity, dissolved organic material, ODO, pH, and pressure at 35 locations based on GPS guided stratified random sampling. 35 grid boxes were generated over Lake Mendota using qGIS. Point locations within each grid box were randomized before each sampling effort. At each point, variables were recorded continuously with the EXO sonde for a two-minute period. Continuous data was overaged over the two-minute period for each sample point.
Publication Date
Version Number
1

Microbial Observatory at North Temperate Lakes LTER High-resolution temporal and spatial dynamics of microbial community structure in freshwater bog lakes 2005 - 2009 original format

Abstract
The North Temperate Lakes - Microbial Observatory seeks to study freshwater microbes over long time scales (10+ years). Observing microbial communities over multiple years using DNA sequencing allows in-depth assessment of diversity, variability, gene content, and seasonal/annual drivers of community composition. Combining information obtained from DNA sequencing with additional experiments, such as investigating the biochemical properties of specific compounds, gene expression, or nutrient concentrations, provides insight into the functions of microbial taxa. Our 16S rRNA gene amplicon datasets were collected from bog lakes in Vilas County, WI, and from Lake Mendota in Madison, WI. Ribosomal RNA gene amplicon sequencing of freshwater environmental DNA was performed on samples from Crystal Bog, North Sparkling Bog, West Sparkling Bog, Trout Bog, South Sparkling Bog, Hell’s Kitchen, and Mary Lake. These microbial time series are valuable both for microbial ecologists seeking to understand the properties of microbial communities and for ecologists seeking to better understand how microbes contribute to ecosystem functioning in freshwater.
Core Areas
Dataset ID
349
Date Range
-
Methods
Protocol available in methods section of: http://msphere.asm.org/content/2/3/e00169-17
Prior to collection, water temperature and dissolved oxygen concentrations are measured using a YSI 550a. The ranges of the epilimnion and hypolimnion are determined based on the location of the thermocline (where temperature/oxygen is changing the fastest). The two layers are collected separately in 1 meter increments using an integrated water column sampler. Water samples are taken back to the lab, shaken thoroughly, and filtered via peristaltic pump through 0.22 micron filters (Pall Supor). Filters are temporarily stored at -20C after collection and then transferred to -80C after transport on dry ice from Trout Lake Station to UW-Madison. Nutrient samples are collected bi-weekly following standard LTER protocols. DNA is extracted from filters using a FASTDNA SpinKit for Soil with minor modifications. (In cases of low yield or specialized sequencing methods, a phenol-chloroform extraction is used instead). The protocol for sequencing and analysis of data varies by year and by sub-project.
Version Number
4

North Temperate Lakes LTER General Lake Model Parameter Set for Lake Mendota, Summer 2016 Calibration

Abstract
The General Lake Model (GLM), an open source, one-dimensional hydrodynamic model, was used to simulate various physical, chemical, and biological variables on Lake Mendota between 15 April 2016 and 11 November 2016. GLM (v.2.1.8) was coupled to the Aquatic EcoDynamics (AED) module library via the Framework for Aquatic Biogeochemical Modeling (FABM). GLM-AED requires four major “scripts” to run the model. First, the glm2.nml file configures lake metadata, meteorological driver data, stream inflow and outflow driver data, and physical response variables. Second, the aed2.nml file configures various biogeochemical modules for the simulation of oxygen, carbon, phosphorus, and nitrogen, among others. Third, aed2_phyto_pars.nml configures all parameters pertaining to phytoplankton dynamics. And fourth, aed2_zoop_pars.nml configures all parameters pertaining to zooplankton dynamics. This dataset contains parameter descriptions and values as they were used to simulate organic carbon and greenhouse gas production on Lake Mendota in summer 2016. Meteorological data and stream files used in this calibration are also included in this dataset. Additional methods and model descriptions can be found in J.A. hart’s Masters Thesis, University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Limnology, May 2017. Readers are referred to the GLM (Hipsey et al. 2014) and AED (Hipsey et al. 2013) science manuals for further details on model configuration.
Additional Information
completed
Contact
Dataset ID
348
Date Range
-
Methods
This study used the R packages “GLMr” (https://github.com/GLEON/GLMr) and “glmtools” (https://github.com/USGS-R/glmtools) to interact with GLM-AED from the R statistical environment.

Hourly meteorological data were obtained for 2010-2016 from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) and included air temperature, relative humidity, short wave radiation, long wave radiation, wind speed, rain accumulation, and snow accumulation.

Average daily stream discharge and nitrogen and phosphorus loads were obtained from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Information System (NWIS) water quality database. All streams included in this study are monitored by the USGS. This study used 2014 nutrient loading data over the simulation time period since 2016 nutrient data were not yet available. Only the Yahara River and Pheasant Branch Creek have data on daily nutrient loads; thus, Pheasant Branch nutrient concentrations were also applied to both Dorn Creek and Sixmile Creek, which contribute near equivalent volume to Lake Mendota. Since GLM-AED requires nutrient concentration rather than load, water column concentrations were back calculated using load and discharge.

Daily OC loads (POC and DOC, individually) were estimated for each individual inflow (n=4) from observed weekly measurements of OC concentration (doi: 10.6073/pasta/86094298f5a9085869518372934bf9d7)
using stream-specific linear models (Lathrop et al. 1998). The linear relationship between known log-scaled OC loads and log-scaled discharge for each individual stream was used to predict the OC load for each day in the model simulation time period. Again, water column OC concentrations were back calculated using the load and discharge.

A manual calibration routine was conducted to optimize the goodness-of-fit of various state variables in GLM-AED, especially those known to influence OC and GHG dynamics. We used visual comparison of predictions and observations, as well as a quantitative approach, to assess goodness-of-fit. We calibrated water balance and water temperature to effectively simulate lake level and stratification. We also calibrated DO, Secchi depth, TN, TP, DOC, and CH4. Finally, we calibrated phytoplankton dynamics according to four phytoplankton functional groups, recognizing that phytoplankton contribute substantially to the OC pool.

Version Number
13

Cascade project at North Temperate Lakes LTER - High-resolution spatial analysis of CASCADE lakes during experimental nutrient enrichment 2015 - 2016

Abstract
This dataset contains high-resolution spatio-temporal water quality data from two experimental lakes during a whole-ecosystem experiment. Through gradual nutrient addition, we induced a cyanobacteria bloom in an experimental lake (Peter Lake) while leaving a nearby reference lake (Paul Lake) as a control. Peter and Paul Lakes (Gogebic county, MI USA), were sampled using the FLAMe platform (Crawford et al. 2015) multiple times during the summers of 2015 and 2016. In 2015 nutrient additions to Peter Lake began on 1 June, and ceased on 29 June, Paul Lake was left unmanipulated. In 2016 no nutrients were added to either lake. Measurements were taken using a YSI EXO2 probe and a Garmin echoMap 50s. Sensor- data were collected continuously at 1 Hz and linked via timestamp to create spatially explicit data for each lake.

Crawford, J. T., L. C. Loken, N. J. Casson, C. Smith, A. G. Stone, and L. A. Winslow. 2015. High-speed limnology: Using advanced sensors to investigate spatial variability in biogeochemistry and hydrology. Environmental Science & Technology 49:442–450.
Contact
Dataset ID
343
Date Range
-
Maintenance
complete
Methods
In two consecutive years, we measured lake-wide spatial patterning of cyanobacteria using the FLAMe platform (Crawford et al. 2015). To evaluate early warning indicators of a critical transition, in the first year we induced a cyanobacteria bloom through nutrient addition in an experimental lake while using a nearby unmanipulated lake as a reference ecosystem (Pace et al. 2017). During the second year, both lakes were left unmanipulated. Proposed detection methods for early warning indicators were compared between the manipulated and reference lakes to test for their ability to accurately detect statistical signals before the cyanobacteria bloom developed.
Peter and Paul Lakes are small, oligotrophic lakes (Peter: 2.5 ha, 6 m, 19.6 m and Paul: 1.7 ha, 3.9 m, 15 m, for surface area, mean, and max depth respectively) located in the Northern Highlands Lake District in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, USA (89°32’ W, 46°13’ N). These lakes have similar physical and chemical properties and are connected via a culvert with Paul Lake being upstream. Both lakes stratify soon after ice-off and remain stratified usually into November (for extensive lake descriptions, see Carpenter and Kitchell, 1993).
In the first year, Peter Lake was fertilized daily starting on 1 June 2015 (DOY 152) with a nutrient addition of 20 mg N m-2 d-1 and 3 mg P m-2 d-1 (molar N:P of 15:1) through the addition of H3PO4 and NH4NO3 until 29 June (day of year, DOY 180). The decision to stop nutrient additions required meeting four predefined criteria based on temporal changes in phycocyanin and chlorophyll concentrations indicative of early warning behavior of a critical transition to a persistent cyanobacteria bloom state. (Pace et al. 2017). Nutrients uniformly mix within 1-2 days after fertilization based on prior studies (Cole and Pace 1998). No nutrient additions were made to Paul Lake. In the second year (2016), neither lake received nutrient additions.
We mapped the surface water characteristics of both experimental lakes to identify changes in the spatial dynamics of cyanobacteria. In 2015, mapping occurred weekly from 4 June to 15 August (11 sample weeks). In 2016, when neither lake was fertilized, the lakes were mapped three times in early to mid-summer. In both years, mapping occurred between the hours of 07:00 to 12:00 (before the daily nutrient addition). We rotated the order that we sampled the lakes to avoid potential biases due to differences in time of day. Each individual lake sampling event was completed in approximately one hour.
The FLAMe platform maps the spatial pattern of water characteristics. A boat-mounted sampling system continuously pumps surface water from the lake to a series of sensors while geo-referencing each measurement (complete description of the FLAMe platform in Crawford et al. 2015). For this study, the FLAMe was mounted on a small flat-bottomed boat propelled by an electric motor and was outfitted with a YSI EXO2™ multi-parameter sonde (YSI, Yellow Springs, OH, USA). We focused for this study on measures of phycocyanin (a pigment unique to cyanobacteria) and temperature. Phycocyanin florescence was measured using the optical EXO™ Total Algae PC Smart Sensor. The Total Algae PC Smart Sensor was calibrated with a rhodamine solution based on the manufacturer’s recommendations. Phycocyanin concentrations are reported as ug/L; however, these concentrations should be considered as relative because we did not calibrate the sensor to actual phycocyanin nor blue-green algae concentrations. Geographic positions were measured using a Garmin echoMAP™ 50s. Sensor- data were collected continuously at 1 Hz and linked via timestamp to create spatially explicit data for each lake. Each sampling produced approximately 3500 measurements in the manipulated lake and 2000 in the reference lake. The measurements were distributed by following a gridded pattern across the entire lake surface to characterize spatial patterns over the extent of the lake.
Version Number
15

North Temperate Lakes LTER Long-term winter chemical limnology and days since ice-on for primary study lakes 1983 - 2014

Abstract
This data set integrates long-term data sets on winter nutrient chemistry with ice phenology (number of days since ice-on), focusing on the subset of measurements taken during ice cover. Parameters characterizing limnology of 5 primary lakes (Allequash, Big Muskellunge, Crystal, Sparkling, and Trout lakes, are measured at one station in the deepest part of each lake at the surface, middle, and deep (~1 meter above bottom). These parameters include nitrate-N, ammonium-N, total dissolved phosphorus, dissolved inorganic carbon, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and pH. Water temperature and dissolved oxygen values are the zonal averages from more complete depth profiles. Sampling Frequency: every 6 weeks during ice-covered season for the northern lakes. Number of sites: 5
Dataset ID
341
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Methods
This is a compilation of three data sets

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Chemical Limnology of Primary Study Lakes: Nutrients, pH and Carbon 1981 - current
https://lter.limnology.wisc.edu/dataset/north-temperate-lakes-lter-chemical-limnology-primary-study-lakes-nutrients-ph-and-carbon-19

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Physical Limnology of Primary Study Lakes 1981 - current
https://lter.limnology.wisc.edu/dataset/north-temperate-lakes-lter-physical-limnology-primary-study-lakes-1981-current

North Temperate Lakes LTER: Ice Duration - Trout Lake Area 1981 - current
https://lter.limnology.wisc.edu/dataset/north-temperate-lakes-lter-ice-duration-trout-lake-area-1981-current
Version Number
6

North Temperate Lakes LTER Estimated winter inputs of stream water and groundwater to primary study lakes 1983 - 2014

Abstract
This data set integrates and summarizes daily surface and groundwater inputs to 5 primary study lakes, using model estimates from a data-driven USGS hydrologic model (Hunt et al. 2013; Hunt and Walker 2017), and ice phenology data (number of days since ice-on). The lakes are Allequash, Big Muskellunge, Crystal, Sparkling, and Trout. Powers et al. (2017) used these data to estimate upper and lower bounds for exogenous chemical inputs to the lakes during winter. For a given lake and winter year, cumulative surface water and groundwater inputs were calculated across the ice cover period. For each lake, this data set reports the mean, maximum, and minimum winter water inputs observed across years, in units of water volume, % of average lake volume, and volume per winter day.Sampling Frequency: 1 per lake, with multiple summary values reported (i.e., mean, min, max). Number of sites: 5Hunt, R.J. et al., 2013. Simulation of Climate - Change effects on streamflow, Lake water budgets, and stream temperature using GSFLOW and SNTEMP, Trout Lake Watershed, Wisconsin. USGS Scientific Investigations Report., pp.2013-5159. Available at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/258363719_Simulation_of_Climate-Change_Effects_on_Streamflow_Lake_Water_Budgets_and_Stream_Temperature_Using_GSFLOW_and_SNTEMP_Trout_Lake_Watershed_WisconsinHunt, R.J., and Walker, J.F., 2017, GSFLOW groundwater-surface water model 2016 update for the Trout Lake Watershed, Wisconsin: U.S. Geological Survey data release, https://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7M32SZ2Powers SM, Labou SG, Baulch HM, Hunt RJ, Lottig NR, Hampton SE, Stanley EH. In press (expected 2017). Ice duration drives winter nitrate accumulation in north temperate lakes. Limnology and Oceanography Letters.
Dataset ID
340
Data Sources
Date Range
-
LTER Keywords
Methods
This dataset is a compilations of:
USGS hydrologic model estimates (Hunt et al. in preparation)
and
North Temperate Lakes LTER: Ice Duration - Trout Lake Area 1981 - current
https://lter.limnology.wisc.edu/dataset/north-temperate-lakes-lter-ice-duration-trout-lake-area-1981-current
Version Number
7

Spatial variability in water chemistry of four Wisconsin aquatic ecosystems - High speed limnology Environmental Science and Technology datasets

Abstract
Advanced sensor technology is widely used in aquatic monitoring and research. Most applications focus on temporal variability, whereas spatial variability has been challenging to document. We assess the capability of water chemistry sensors embedded in a high-speed water intake system to document spatial variability. We developed a new sensor platform to continuously samples surface water at a range of speeds (0 to > 45 km hr-1) resulting in high-density, meso-scale spatial data. Here, we archive data associated with an Environmental Science and Technology publication. Data include a single spatial survey of the following aquatic ecosystems: Lake Mendota, Allequash Creek, Pool 8 of the Upper Mississippi River, and Trout Bog. Data have been provided in three formats (raw, hydraulic-corrected, and tau-corrected).
Dataset ID
337
Date Range
-
Maintenance
completed
Methods
The Fast Limnology Automated Measurement (FLAMe) platform is a novel flow-through system designed to sample inland waters at both low- (0 to appr. 10 km hr-1) and high-speeds (10 to greater than 45 km hr-1) described in Crawford et al. (2015). The FLAMe consists of three components: an intake manifold that attaches to the stern of a boat; a sensor and control box that contains hoses, valves, a circulation pump and sensor cradles; and a battery bank to power the electrical components. The boat-mounted intake manifold serves multiple purposes. First, sensors are mounted inside the boat, protecting them from potential damage. Second, the intake system creates a constant, bubble-free water flow, thus preventing any issues for optical sensors due to cavitation. Finally, to analyze dissolved gases, a constant water source is needed on board. Water flow via both the slow- and high-speed intakes is regulated by the onboard impeller pump, allowing for seamless switching between slow- and high-speed operations. Any number of sensors could be integrated into the platform with simple modifications, and can be combined with common limnological instruments such as acoustic depth-finders. In our example applications we used a YSI EXO2 multiparameter sonde (EXO2; Yellow Springs, OH, USA), and a Satlantic SUNA V2 optical nitrate (NO3) sensor (Halifax, NS, Canada), both integrated into the control box plumbing with flow-through cells available from the manufacturer. Additionally, a Los Gatos Research ultraportable greenhouse gas analyzer (UGGA) (cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer; Mountain View, CA, USA) was used to measure dry mole fraction of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) dissolved in surface water by equilibrating water with a small headspace using a sprayer-type equilibration system that has previously been shown to have fast response times relative to other designs16 (Figure S1). Both the EXO2 and the UGGA are capable of logging data at 1 Hz. Because the SUNA was operated out of the water and on a boat during warm periods, data were collected less frequently (appr. 0.1 Hz) to minimize lamp-on time and avoid the lamp temperature cutoff of 35° C. The EXO2 sonde uses a combination of electrical and optical sensors for: specific conductivity, water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, fluorescent dissolved organic matter (fDOM), chlorophyll-a fluorescenece, and phycocyanin fluorescence. The SUNA instrument measures NO3 using in situ ultraviolet spectroscopy between 190-370 nm, has a detection range of 0.3-3000 microM NO3, and a precision of 2 microM NO3. The UGGA has a reported precision of 1 ppb (by volume). In order to translate time-series data from the instruments into spatial data, we also logged latitude and longitude at 1 Hz with a global positioning system (GPS) with the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) functionality enabled allowing for less than 3 m accuracy for 95percent of measured coordinates. Synchronized time-stamps from the EXO2, UGGA, SUNA, and GPS were used to combine data streams into a single spatially-referenced dataset.
We ran a simple set of experiments to determine the residence time of the system and the overall response time of the EXO2 and UGGA sensors integrated into the platform. After determining first-order response characteristics of each sensor, we applied an ordinary differential equation method to correct the raw data for significant changes in water input resulting in higher accuracy spatial data (see Crawford et al. 2015).
Sensor response experiments
We conducted a series of sensor response experiments on Lake Mendota on August 1, 2014. The goal was to understand the potential lags and minimum response times for the EXO2 and UGGA sensors integrated into the FLAMe platform. These data were then used to develop correction procedures for higher accuracy spatial datasets. To test sensor responses to step-changes in water chemistry, we mixed a 40 L tracer solution into a plastic carboy that was connected to the reservoir port on the FLAMe. The reservoir was mixed with 50 mL of rhodamine WT to test the phytoplankton fluorescence sensors, 6 mL of quinine sulfate solution in acid buffer (100 QSE) to test the fDOM sensor, 14 g of KCl to test the conductivity sensor, and appr. 2 kg of ice to reduce the temperature of the solution relative to lake water. The mixture volume was increased to 40 L using tap water. We did not modify the CO2 concentration or pH in the carboy as we found the municipal water source to have greater than ambient lake CO2 (4300 vs. 290 microatm, respectively) and lower pH (7.5 vs 8.3, respectively). At the beginning of the experiments, we allowed lake water to circulate through the system for appr. 10 minutes. We then switched to the tracer solution for a period of five minutes, followed by five minutes of lake water, then back to the tracer solution for an additional five minutes.
Using the step-change experiment data, we determined each sensors hydraulic time constant (Hr) and parameter time constant (taus). The sensor-specific Hr is a function of system water residence time and sensor position/shielding within the system. Taus is the time required for a 63 percent response to a step-change input. Hr was calculated based on the plateau experiments and was indicated by the first observation with a non-zero rate of change. The CO2 and CH4 sensors had a much greater Hr than the EXO2 sensors because water must travel further through the system before equilibrating with the gas solution being pumped to the UGGA. Using these Hr values, we offset response variables thus removing the hydraulic lag. This correction does not account for sensor-specific response patterns (tau s). The EXO2 sensors have manufacturer-reported taus values between 2-5 s, but these values are not appropriate to apply to the FLAMe system because they do not include system hydraulic lag and mixing. In order to match sensor readings with spatial information, we first applied Hr values from each sensor output according to equation 2. This step aligns the time at which each sensor begins responding to the changing water, and accounts for the physical distance the water must travel before being sensed
In order to match individual sensor response characteristics and to obtain more accurate spatial data, we then applied sensor-specific corrections using Equation 3 (Fofonoff et al., 1974).
We first smoothed the raw data using a running mean of 3 observations in order to reduce inherent noise of the 1 Hz data. We then calculated dX/dt using a 3-point moving window around Xc. Equation 3 should ideally lead to a step response to a step-change input. We note that this is the same strategy used to correct oceanographic conductivity and temperature instruments (see Fozdar et al., 1985). Overall, the taus-corrected data show good responses to step-change inputs and indicate that this is a useful technique for generating higher accuracy spatial data. We include three types of data for each variable including: raw (e.g., TempC), the hydraulic lag corrected (e.g., TempC_hydro) and the taus-corrected data (e.g., TempC_tau). Note that not all sensors were used in each survey and not all sensors have each type of correction. This data was from our preliminary FLAMe sampling campaigns and future studies will include additional sensor outputs and corrections.
We used the FLAMe throughout the summer of 2014 on four distinct aquatic ecosystems including: a small dystrophic lake, a stream/lake complex, a medium-sized eutrophic lake, and a managed reach of the Upper Mississippi River. Each of these applications demonstrates the spatial variability of surface water chemistry and the flexibility of FLAMe for limnological research.
References
Crawford JT, Loken LC, Casson NJ, Smith C, Stone AG, and Winslow LA (2015) High-speed limnology: Using advanced sensors to investigate spatial variability in biogeochemistry and hydrology. Environmental Science and Technology 49:442-450.
Fozdar FM, Parker GJ, and Imberger J (1985) Matching temperature and conductivity sensor response characteristics. Journal of Physical Oceanography 15:1557-1569.
Version Number
14

Chloride and sulfate concentrations in 1918 Marsh, Madison, WI, 2012-2016

Abstract
Beginning in September 2014 bi-weekly chloride and sulfate concentrations at a suite of sampling locations in and around 1918 Marsh, a small wetland on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus from 2012-2016. Collection is ongoing at a lesser intensity. Water temperature, water depth, and ice thickness are provided for each sampling event. Since fall 2014 water was collected via syringes, and filtered through a 25 mm 0.45um GMF filter into plastic scintillation vials in the field. All samples were analyzed on an ion chromatograph (Dionex ICS 2100) using an electro-chemical suppressor. Prior to September 2014 samples were taken by dipping the opening of a plastic sample bottle below the surface and the sample was filtered in the Laboratory prior to chemical measurements. Samples were largely from the winter season and taken at ca. 3-week intervals. In these early samples dissolved oxygen was also measured with a meter in the field.
Additional Information
Funding:
Title of grant: LTER: Comparative Study of a Suite of Lakes in Wisconsin
Principle Investigator: Emily Stanley, Center for Limnology, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Granting agency: National Science Foundation under Cooperative Agreement
Grant identification number: #DEB-1440297
Contact
Dataset ID
336
Date Range
-
Methods
All samples were collected at the surface of the marsh. If ice was present, a hole was first made with an ice drill or an ice chisel (spud). Since fall 2014 water was collected via syringes, and filtered through a 25 mm 0.45um GMF filter into plastic scintillation vials in the field. All samples were stored at 4 ºC and analyzed at the University of Wisconsin’s Center for Limnology on an ion chromatograph (Dionex ICS 2100) using an electro-chemical suppressor. For each sampling event, water temperature, water depth, ice thickness, and snow depth were recorded. Water depth was measured from the water surface to the marsh bottom. Water depth was measured from the water surface to the marsh bottom. Depth measurements are prone to error owing to soft bottom sediments and benthic macrophytes. Ice thickness was measured with a meter stick after using an ice drill or ice chisel (spud) to open a hole in the lake ice. The meter stick was affixed with a horizontal bar that was used to locate the bottom of the ice. Water Temperature was measured with a Taylor household thermometer. Prior to September 2014 samples were taken by dipping the opening of a plastic sample bottle below the surface and the sample was filtered in the Laboratory prior to chemical measurements. Samples were largely from the winter season and taken at ca. 3-week intervals. In these early samples dissolved oxygen was also measured with a meter in the field.
Short Name
1918 Anions
Version Number
8
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